Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
17 "Case-control studies"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Original Articles
Interaction between vitamin E intake and a COMT gene variant on colorectal cancer risk among Korean adults: a case-control study
Shinyoung Jun, Madhawa Gunathilake, Jeonghee Lee, Jae Hwan Oh, Hee Jin Chang, Dae Kyung Sohn, Aesun Shin, Jeongseon Kim
Epidemiol Health. 2023;45:e2023100.   Published online November 14, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2023100
  • 2,303 View
  • 114 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Previous human trials have not supported the anticarcinogenic effect of vitamin E despite biological plausibility and considerable epidemiological evidence. A possible explanation for this inconsistency is the interactive effect of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene and supplemental vitamin E on cancer. We examined whether a COMT gene variant modulates the effect of dietary vitamin E intake on colorectal cancer (CRC) risk.
METHODS
In this case-control study of Korean adults (975 cases and 975 age- and sex-matched controls), dietary vitamin E density (mg/1,000 kcal) was measured using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, COMT single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs740603 (A>G) was genotyped, and CRC was verified histologically. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using unconditional logistic regression models with adjustments for potential confounders.
RESULTS
Higher vitamin E density was associated with a lower risk of CRC (highest vs. lowest quartiles: OR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.55 to 0.96; p-for-trend=0.002). When stratified by COMT SNP rs740603 genotype, the inverse association between vitamin E density and CRC risk was confined to those with at least 1 A allele (≥median vs. <median: OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.51 to 0.78). The interaction between rs740603 and vitamin E density was significant (p-for-interaction=0.020). No direct association was observed between COMT SNP rs740603 and CRC risk (OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.83 to 1.41).
CONCLUSIONS
Our findings support a role for a genetic polymorphism in COMT in modifying the association between dietary vitamin E intake and CRC.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구는 국립암센터에서 수집한 대장암 환자-대조군 자료를 활용하여, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) 유전자의 단일염기다형성(SNP)에 따라 비타민 E 섭취와 대장암 위험 간의 연관성이 달라지는지 파악하고자 하였다. 분석 결과, COMT SNP rs740603의 유전자형에 따라 식이를 통한 비타민 E 섭취 밀도와 대장암 위험 간의 연관성이 다르게 나타나 COMT 유전자와 비타민 E 섭취 간의 상호작용이 대장암 발생 위험에 영향을 미칠 가능성이 있음을 제시하였다.
Key Message
In this case-control study of Korean adults, we examined whether a polymorphism in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene modulates the effect of dietary vitamin E intake on colorectal cancer risk. Our results suggest that the inverse association between vitamin E density and colorectal cancer risk is confined to carriers of the COMT rs740603 A allele. The findings of our study support the interactive effect of the COMT gene and vitamin E intake on colorectal cancer risk.
Association between PM2.5 exposure and risk of Parkinson’s disease in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Taiwan: a nested case-control study
Ci-Wen Luo, Yu-Hsiang Kuan, Wen-Ying Chen, Chun-Jung Chen, Frank Cheau-Feng Lin, Stella Chin-Shaw Tsai
Epidemiol Health. 2023;45:e2023094.   Published online October 17, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2023094
  • 2,013 View
  • 112 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
This cohort study investigated the correlation between Parkinson’s disease (PD) risk and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) risk under particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm (PM<sub>2.5</sub>) exposure.
METHODS
Data from the National Health Research Institutes of Taiwan were used in this study. The Environmental Protection Administration of Taiwan established an air quality monitoring network for monitoring Taiwan’s general air quality. COPD was indicated by at least 3 outpatient records and 1 hospitalization for COPD. After the implementation of age, sex, and endpoint matching at a 1:4 ratio, 137 patients and 548 patients were included in the case group and control group, respectively. Based on the 2005 World Health Organization (WHO) standards, monthly air particle concentration data were classified into the following 4 groups in analyses of exposure–response relationships: normal level, and 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 times the WHO level ([concentration ≥2]×25 μg/m<sup>3</sup>×number of exposure months).
RESULTS
A multivariate logistic regression revealed that the 1.0 and 1.5 WHO level groups did not significantly differ from the normal level group, but the 2.0 WHO level did (odds ratio, 4.091; 95% confidence interval, 1.180 to 14.188; p=0.038).
CONCLUSIONS
Elevated PM<sub>2.5</sub> concentrations were significantly correlated with an increased risk of PD among patients with COPD. Furthermore, exposure to high PM<sub>2.5</sub> levels can further increase the risk of PD.
Summary
Key Message
This nested case-control study, utilizing data from Taiwan's National Health Research Institutes and after meticulous matching, found that higher exposure to PM2.5 was associated with an increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease among individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, with those exposed to PM2.5 levels at 2 times the WHO standards having a 4 times higher odds of Parkinson's disease compared to those exposed to normal levels, indicating that air pollution may exacerbate neurological disease risk in those with existing respiratory conditions.
Epidemiologic Investigation
Investigation of a human brucellosis outbreak in Douz, Tunisia, 2018
Nejib Charaa, Rabaa Ghrab, Aicha Ben Othman, Mohamed Makhlouf, Hejer Ltaief, Nissaf Ben Alaya, Mohamed Chahed
Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022048.   Published online May 18, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2022048
  • 7,211 View
  • 322 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
In 2017, the incidence of human brucellosis in Tunisia was 9.8 per 100,000 population. In the Douz district, 2 cases were reported in March 2018. Prior to that date, the last indigenous cases to be reported in Douz had been in 2015. This study aimed to identify the source of this new contamination and recommend control interventions.
METHODS
This case-control study included residents of Douz who presented with clinical symptoms of brucellosis and had a subsequent Wright test antibody titer ≥ 1/160. The controls were neighbors of the infected cases who had a negative Rose Bengal test. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to estimate the odds ratios of risk factors. Goats belonging to the cases and controls were actively screened.
RESULTS
Twenty-five infected cases and 52 uninfected controls were enrolled. All infected cases had consumed goat milk and 92% had purchased it from the same breeder. Consumption of goat milk from this breeder (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 30.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 6.47 to 235.91) and overall consumption of raw goat milk (aOR, 14.84; 95% CI, 2.04 to 310.44) were independent risk factors for brucellosis. The breeder had 18 goats, 5 of which were smuggled from a neighboring country. Three of those goats were diagnosed with brucellosis.
CONCLUSIONS
Consumption of raw milk from smuggled sick goats was the main risk factor in this outbreak. The sick goats were slaughtered and an education campaign was conducted. Vaccination, control of cross-border animal movements, and control of goat milk sales must be strengthened to prevent the spread of brucellosis in southwestern Tunisia.
Summary
Key Message
Human brucellosis, despite being a major economic and health problem and the availability of proven control methods, is still endemic in North African countries. The scarcity of epidemiological data, under-reporting, certain weaknesses in surveillance systems and the lack of well-conducted outbreak investigations, contribute to this endemic state. This field epidemiological investigation of a human brucellosis outbreak highlighted the importance of serological surveillance, the slaughter of infected animals, vaccination, control of animal movements across borders and pasteurization of milk in the fight against this disease.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Long ignored but making a comeback: a worldwide epidemiological evolution of human brucellosis
    Zhiguo Liu, Liping Gao, Miao Wang, Min Yuan, Zhenjun Li
    Emerging Microbes & Infections.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Native circulating Brucella melitensis lineages causing a brucellosis epidemic in Qinghai, China
    Hongmei Xue, Zhijun Zhao, Jianling Wang, Li Ma, Jiquan Li, Xuxin Yang, Lingling Ren, Liqing Xu, Zhiguo Liu, Zhenjun Li
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Articles
Bacillus of Calmette and Guérin (BCG) and the risk of leprosy in Ciudad del Este, Paraguay, 2016-2017
Nancy Carolina Cuevas, Victor M. Cardenas
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021060.   Published online September 8, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2021060
  • 7,652 View
  • 96 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Paraguay has experienced a 35% reduction in the detected incidence of leprosy during the last ten years, as the vaccination coverage against tuberculosis (Bacillus of Calmette and Guérin [BCG] vaccine) reached ≥95% among infants. The objective of this case-control study was to evaluate the protective effect of BCG on the risk of leprosy.
METHODS
We used a population-based case-control study of 20 leprosy confirmed cases reported among residents of Ciudad del Este, Paraguay, diagnosed in 2016-2017. Three controls were selected from a random sample of households from the city. We assessed vaccine effectiveness using 1- odds ratio [OR], and confounding for age, gender, education, occupation, and marital status using stratified and exact logistic regression, and explored if there was effect modification calculating the synergy factor (SF) and relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI).
RESULTS
After controlling for age, gender, education, occupation and marital status, the OR of BCG scar on the risk of leprosy was 0.10 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.02 to 0.45), for an estimate of vaccine effectiveness of 89.5% reduced risk of leprosy (95% CI, 55.2 to 98.1). There was evidence of heterogeneity by which the effectiveness of BCG seemed stronger among younger persons (Breslow-Day and Z-test of the SF had a p<0.05), and both the RERI and SF indicated a less then multiplicative and additive interaction of BCG and younger age.
CONCLUSIONS
BCG vaccination was associated with a decreased risk of leprosy in the study population, particularly in persons born after 1980.
Summary
Key Message
Paraguay had the second highest reported incidence in the Americas, but no previous study had investigated the topic of BCG for leprosy in Paraguay. We confirmed that BCG protected from leprosy, hence it may have contributed to the observed decline of leprosy.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • BCG and SARS-CoV-2—What Have We Learned?
    Jakub Kulesza, Ewelina Kulesza, Piotr Koziński, Wojciech Karpik, Marlena Broncel, Marek Fol
    Vaccines.2022; 10(10): 1641.     CrossRef
Risk factors associated with the recent cholera outbreak in Yemen: a case-control study
Fekri Dureab, Albrecht Jahn, Johannes Krisam, Asma Dureab, Omer Zain, Sameh Al-Awlaqi, Olaf Müller
Epidemiol Health. 2019;41:e2019015.   Published online April 21, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2019015
  • 20,612 View
  • 501 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The cholera outbreak in Yemen has become the largest in the recent history of cholera records, having reached more than 1.4 million cases since it started in late 2016. This study aimed to identify risk factors for cholera in this outbreak.
METHODS
A case-control study was conducted in Aden in 2018 to investigate risk factors for cholera in this still-ongoing outbreak. In total, 59 cholera cases and 118 community controls were studied.
RESULTS
The following risk factors were associated with being a cholera case in the bivariate analysis: a history of travelling and having had visitors from outside Aden Province; eating outside the house; not washing fruit, vegetables, and khat (a local herbal stimulant) before consumption; using common-source water; and not using chlorine or soap in the household. In the multivariate analysis, not washing khat and the use of common-source water remained significant risk factors for being a cholera case.
CONCLUSIONS
Behavioural factors and unsafe water appear to be the major risk factors in the recent cholera outbreak in Yemen. In order to reduce the risk of cholera, hygiene practices for washing khat and vegetables and the use and accessibility of safe drinking water should be promoted at the community level.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward COVID-19 prevention in Yemen: a community-based cross-sectional study
    Ola El Hajj Hassan, Ahmed Asa’ad Al-Aghbari, Maureen McGowan, Maureen Dar Iang, Huda Omer Basaleem, Khaled Abdulla Al-Sakkaf, Dalia Hyzam, Albrecht Jahn, Fekri Dureab
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Inadequate Hand Washing, Lack of Clean Drinking Water and Latrines as Major Determinants of Cholera Outbreak in Somali Region, Ethiopia in 2019
    Jemal Mussa Challa, Tamirat Getachew, Adera Debella, Melkamu Merid, Genanaw Atnafe, Addis Eyeberu, Abdi Birhanu, Lemma Demissie Regassa
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Determining factors associated with cholera disease in Ethiopia using Bayesian hierarchical modeling
    Tsigereda Tilahun Letta, Denekew Bitew Belay, Endale Alemayehu Ali
    BMC Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Cholera outbreak investigation report in Mille woreda, Afar region, Ethiopia, 2019
    Hana Mekonen, Kefyalew Amene, Dr Samrawit Bisrat, Tesfahun Abye
    MOJ Women s Health.2022; 11(2): 63.     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors of Cholera Transmission in Al Hudaydah, Yemen: Case-Control Study
    Abdulqawi Mohammed Qaserah, Mohammed Abdullah Al Amad, Abdulwahed Abduljabbar Al Serouri, Yousef Saleh Khader
    JMIR Public Health and Surveillance.2021; 7(7): e27627.     CrossRef
  • Solar-powered desalination, a novel solar still directly connected to solar parabolic trough
    Ali M. Aqlan, Musaed Aklan, Abdulmalik E. Momin
    Energy Reports.2021; 7: 2245.     CrossRef
  • Cholera Outbreak in Hadhramout, Yemen: The Epidemiological Weeks 2019
    Eidha Ali Bin-Hameed, Huda Ameen Joban
    International Journal of Epidemiologic Research.2021; 8(1): 40.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge on and preventive practices of cholera in Al-Mahweet – Yemen, 2018: a cross-sectional study
    Fekri Dureab, Yasameen Al-Qadasi, Hani Nasr, Marwah Al-Zumair, Taha Al-Mahbashi
    Journal of Water and Health.2021; 19(6): 1002.     CrossRef
  • Reinventing the Wheel of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato Transmission to Humans
    Francesca Tamarozzi, Peter Deplazes, Adriano Casulli
    Trends in Parasitology.2020; 36(5): 427.     CrossRef
Dietary patterns, nutrition, and risk of breast cancer: a case-control study in the west of Iran
Behjat Marzbani, Javad Nazari, Farid Najafi, Behnaz Marzbani, Sara Shahabadi, Mahin Amini, Mehdi Moradinazar, Yahya Pasdar, Ebrahim Shakiba, Saeed Amini
Epidemiol Health. 2019;41:e2019003.   Published online January 24, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2019003
  • 20,315 View
  • 844 Download
  • 33 Web of Science
  • 33 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Unhealthy dietary patterns are the most important changeable risk factors for breast cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between dietary patterns and the risk of breast cancer among under-50 year women in the west of Iran.
METHODS
All women under 50 years old with pathologically confirmed breast cancer between 2013 and 2015 who were referred to oncology clinics in the west of Iran, and 408 under-50 women referred to other outpatient clinics who were without breast or other cancers at the time of the study and 2 years later were selected as the control group. The data were collected using the middle-aged periodical care form of the Iranian Ministry of Health and analyzed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression in Stata.
RESULTS
The most powerful risk factor for breast cancer was fried foods; the odds ratio of consuming fried foods more than once a month for breast cancer was 4.5 (95% confidence interval, 2.1 to 9.4). A dose-response model indicated that increasing vegetable and fruit consumption up to 90 servings per month decreased the odds of breast cancer, but consuming more than 90 servings per month increased the risk.
CONCLUSIONS
Inadequate consumption of vegetables and consumption of soft drinks, industrially produced juices, fried foods, and sweets were identified as risk factors for breast cancer. In response to these findings, it is necessary to raise awareness and to provide education about healthy diets and the need to change unhealthy dietary patterns.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Dietary patterns, cooking methods and breast cancer risk in Mexico: An exploratory case-control study
    Elisa Pineda, María I. Ortega-Vélez, Martin Preciado-Rodríguez, Socorro Saucedo-Tamayo, Graciela Caire-Juvera
    Nutrition and Health.2024; 30(2): 349.     CrossRef
  • Association of microRNA-21 expression with breast cancer subtypes and its potential as an early biomarker
    Sau Har Lee, Brianna
    Pathology - Research and Practice.2024; 254: 155073.     CrossRef
  • Modifiable risk factors for cancer in the middle East and North Africa: a scoping review
    Razan Mansour, Abdallah Al-Ani, Maysa Al-Hussaini, Hikmat Abdel-Razeq, Akram Al-Ibraheem, Asem H. Mansour
    BMC Public Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The impact of BMI on breast cancer – an updated systematic review and meta-analysis
    Nikolaos Tzenios, Mary E. Tazanios, Mohamed Chahine
    Medicine.2024; 103(5): e36831.     CrossRef
  • Eating behaviors and physical activity during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown: Experiences of breast cancer patients on adjuvant hormonal therapy
    Marija Paunovic, Danijela Ristic-Medic, Aleksandra Arsic, Snjezana Petrovic, Predrag Krstic, Milica Kojadinovic, Vesna Vucic
    Vojnosanitetski pregled.2024; 81(5): 279.     CrossRef
  • Assessing nutrition-related knowledge, attitudes, and practices towards breast cancer prevention among female students at the Federal University of Oye-Ekiti, Nigeria
    Ibiwumi Damaris Kolawole, Oni Kunle, Kayode Ajayi, Thomas Prates Ong
    Journal of the Egyptian National Cancer Institute.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of food groups and dietary pattern with breast cancer risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Sangah Shin, Jialei Fu, Woo-Kyoung Shin, Dan Huang, Sukhong Min, Daehee Kang
    Clinical Nutrition.2023; 42(3): 282.     CrossRef
  • Dietary patterns and breast cancer risk, prognosis, and quality of life: A systematic review
    Yuan Bu, Junchao Qu, Siqi Ji, Jingxin Zhou, Mengxin Xue, Jiling Qu, Huiping Sun, Yongbing Liu
    Frontiers in Nutrition.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Dietary Heat-Treatment Contaminants Exposure and Cancer: A Case Study from Turkey
    Hilal Pekmezci, Burhan Basaran
    Foods.2023; 12(12): 2320.     CrossRef
  • The importance of SOCS1 − 1478 CA/del polymorphism and expression in breast cancer: a case–control study in the north of Iran
    Habibbullah Paeiz, Zivar Salehi, Farhad Mashayekhi, Hamid Saeidi Saedi, Laleh Mirzanejad
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment.2023; 202(2): 389.     CrossRef
  • Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) Synergistically Enhances Paclitaxel Activity in Ovarian Cancer Cells
    Anna Kleczka, Radosław Dzik, Agata Kabała-Dzik
    Molecules.2023; 28(15): 5813.     CrossRef
  • Investigation of Breast Cancer Risk Factors in the Imam Hossein and Shohada-E Tajrish Hospitals of Tehran in 2019–2022: A case–control study
    Hanieh Bayat, Sima Nazarpour, Robab Anbiaee
    SN Comprehensive Clinical Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Menopoz-Sonrası Dönemde Meme Kanseri Gelişiminde Beslenme Alışkanlıkları ve Yaşam Kalitesi Etkili mi?
    Burçak ÇUBUKÇU, Fatma TAYHAN KARTAL, Gözde EDE
    Gümüşhane Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi.2023; 12(3): 1301.     CrossRef
  • A clinical-radiomics nomogram based on multimodal ultrasound for predicting the malignancy risk in solid hypoechoic breast lesions
    Guo Shiyan, Jiang Liqing, Yan Yueqiong, Zhang Yan
    Frontiers in Oncology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Current status and prospect of ZIF-based materials for breast cancer treatment
    Yana Zeng, Donghui Liao, Xiangyang Kong, Qianying Huang, Muyi Zhong, Jianqiang Liu, Alireza Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh, Ying Pan, Hailiang Song
    Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces.2023; 232: 113612.     CrossRef
  • Effect of vitamin D supplementation on inflammatory markers and total antioxidant capacity in breast cancer women using a machine learning technique
    Marzieh Tahmasebi, Masoud Veissi, Seyed Ahmad Hosseini, Amir Jamshidnezhad
    Exploration of Targeted Anti-tumor Therapy.2023; : 1059.     CrossRef
  • Dietary pattern and other factors of breast cancer among women: a case control study in Northwest Ethiopia
    Hiwot Fentie, Peter Austin Morton Ntenda, Fentanesh Nibret Tiruneh
    BMC Cancer.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Exploring the geospatial epidemiology of breast cancer in Iran: identifying significant risk factors and spatial patterns for evidence-based prevention strategies
    Mohsen Soleimani, Seyed Mohammad Ayyoubzadeh, Ahmad Jalilvand, Marjan Ghazisaeedi
    BMC Cancer.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Application of Whole-Process Case Management in Patients with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer
    Yunyan Zhao, Ran Zhu, Jie Bai, Jie Li, Xue Jia, Peng Wang, Lijun Jin, Wei long Zhong
    Journal of Oncology.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • Age-specific incidence rates of breast cancer among Japanese women increasing in a conspicuous bimodal distribution pattern
    Nanami Tokutake, Riona Ushiyama, Kyoka Matsubayashi, Yuji Aoki
    Proceedings of Singapore Healthcare.2021; 30(2): 166.     CrossRef
  • Consumption of Sweet Beverages and Cancer Risk. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies
    Fjorida Llaha, Mercedes Gil-Lespinard, Pelin Unal, Izar de Villasante, Jazmín Castañeda, Raul Zamora-Ros
    Nutrients.2021; 13(2): 516.     CrossRef
  • The association between plant-based dietary patterns and risk of breast cancer: a case–control study
    Somaye Rigi, Seyed Mohammad Mousavi, Sanaz Benisi-Kohansal, Leila Azadbakht, Ahmad Esmaillzadeh
    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Preventive measures against development of breast cancer
    Yu. V. Vykhristyuk, G. E. Roitberg, J. V. Dorosh, N. V. Karaseva, R. A. Akobova
    South Russian Journal of Cancer.2021; 2(1): 50.     CrossRef
  • Association between dietary phytochemical index and breast cancer: a case–control study
    Seyed Mojtaba Ghoreishy, Azadeh Aminianfar, Sanaz Benisi-Kohansal, Leila Azadbakht, Ahmad Esmaillzadeh
    Breast Cancer.2021; 28(6): 1283.     CrossRef
  • The Benefit of Enhanced Daycare of Traditional Chinese Medicine for Cancer Treatment Related Adverse Events: A Retrospective Study of Medical Records
    Hsiu-An Wu, Chien-Hung Chen, Ming-Hsien Hsieh, Yung-Chang Wu, Jung-Peng Chiu, Chien-Jung Huang, Chung-Hua Hsu
    Integrative Cancer Therapies.2021; 20: 153473542110256.     CrossRef
  • Differential effects of phenolic extracts from red‐fleshed apple peels and flesh induced G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer MDA‐MB‐231 cells
    Cui Xia Li, Zhen Xian Lin, Xian Hua Zhao, Wei Fang Zuo, Nan Wang, Zong Ying Zhang, Xue Sen Chen
    Journal of Food Science.2021; 86(9): 4209.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of the Effects of Different Dietary Patterns on Breast Cancer: Monitoring Circulating Tumor Cells
    Xiuxiu Wang, Xiaoyu Liu, Zhenzhen Jia, Yilun Zhang, Shuo Wang, Hongyan Zhang
    Foods.2021; 10(9): 2223.     CrossRef
  • The association between adherence to MIND diet and risk of breast cancer: A case–control study
    Fatemeh Sheikhhossein, Hossein Imani, Mohammad Reza Amini, Fatemeh Hosseini, Sakineh Shab‐Bidar
    International Journal of Clinical Practice.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors affecting health services strategic purchasing for breast cancer patients: a mixed study in Iran
    Samereh Yaghoubian, Mohammad Ali Jahani, Zeynab Farhadi, Ghahraman Mahmoudi
    Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of Consumption of Whole-Wheat Breads on FBS, HbA1c, and Blood Lipids in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes
    Javad Nazari, Nasrin Yadegari, Sousan Khodam, Amir Almasi-Hashian, Saeed Amini
    Preventive Nutrition and Food Science.2021; 26(3): 269.     CrossRef
  • Dietary Patterns and Risk of Invasive Ductal and Lobular Breast Carcinomas: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
    Mostafa Dianatinasab, Marjan Rezaian, Elmira HaghighatNezad, Zahra Bagheri-Hosseinabadi, Sasan Amanat, Shahab Rezaeian, Alireza Masoudi, Reza Ghiasvand
    Clinical Breast Cancer.2020; 20(4): e516.     CrossRef
  • Preprocessing Breast Cancer Data to Improve the Data Quality, Diagnosis Procedure, and Medical Care Services
    Zeinab Sajjadnia, Raof Khayami, Mohammad Reza Moosavi
    Cancer Informatics.2020; 19: 117693512091795.     CrossRef
  • Breast cancer risk factors in Iran: a systematic review & meta-analysis
    Amir Shamshirian, Keyvan Heydari, Zahra Shams, Amir Reza Aref, Danial Shamshirian, Omid Reza Tamtaji, Zatollah Asemi, Layla Shojaie, Hamed Mirzaei, Neda Mohammadi, Behdad Zibaee, Keyvan Karimifar, Bahman Zarandi, Akbar Hedayatizadeh-Omran, Reza Alizadeh-N
    Hormone Molecular Biology and Clinical Investigation.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Epidemiologic Investigation
Epidemiologic research on lung damage caused by humidifier disinfectants
Moo-Song Lee, Hwa Jung Kim
Epidemiol Health. 2016;38:e2016031.   Published online July 20, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2016031
  • 16,476 View
  • 279 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
In April 2011 a tertiary hospital located in Seoul, Korea reported several cases of severe respiratory distress of unknown origin in young adults. To find the route of transmission, causative agent and patient risk factors of the outbreak, an investigation of the epidemic was initiated. A hospital based case-control study was conducted to indicate that humidifier detergent use was the cause of the outbreak. This information led the Ministry of Health and Welfare of Korea issued an order that humidifier detergents should be withdrawn from the market. Here, we describe the major events of planning, execution, and interpretation of the study, and discussions between researchers and public authorities following the decision to perform an epidemiologic study, chronologically.
Summary
Korean summary
본 역학조사는 일개 병원에서 신고한 질병 유행에 대해 다학제적 연구 결과로써, 질병의 임상적 특성과 역학적 원인 파악 후 정책적 대책으로 이어진 사례이다. 향후 가습기 살균제 이외에도 일반국민의 건강에 영향을 미칠 수 있는 다양한 생활환경요인에 관심을 가지고, 필요 시 적극적인 조사와 대응이 필요할 것이다.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Evaluation of polyhexamethylene guanidine-induced lung injuries by chest CT, pathologic examination, and RNA sequencing in a rat model
    Cherry Kim, Sang Hoon Jeong, Jaeyoung Kim, Ki Yeol Lee, Jaehyung Cha, Chang Hyun Lee, Eun-Kee Park, Ju-Han Lee
    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Long Term Follow-up Chest CT Imaging in Adult and Pediatric Patients with Humidifier Disinfectant-related Lung Injury
    Soyeoun Lim, Jong Han Leem, Young-Seoub Hong, Jungwon Kim, Soyoung Park, Joon-Sung Joh, Woon-Jung Kwon, Yangho Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Guanidine-based disinfectants, polyhexamethylene guanidine-phosphate (PHMG-P), polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), and oligo(2-(2-ethoxy)ethoxyethyl guanidinium chloride (PGH) induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in A549 alveolar epithelial cells
    Yong Joo Park, Mi Ho Jeong, In Jae Bang, Ha Ryong Kim, Kyu Hyuck Chung
    Inhalation Toxicology.2019; 31(4): 161.     CrossRef
  • Development of QSAR Model for Subchronic Inhalation Toxicity Using Random Forest Regression Method
    Jae Hong Shin, Byeong Hun Lee, Sung Kwang Lee
    Bulletin of the Korean Chemical Society.2019; 40(8): 819.     CrossRef
Original Articles
The incidence of congenital hypothyroidism and its determinants from 2012 to 2014 in Shadegan, Iran: a case-control study
Ehsan Keshavarzian, Ali Asghar Valipoor, Mohammad Reza Maracy
Epidemiol Health. 2016;38:e2016021.   Published online May 26, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2016021
  • 15,821 View
  • 279 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is one of the major causes of preventable mental retardation in infants. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of CH in Shadegan, Khuzestan Province, Iran from 2012 to 2014 and to identify the risk factors associated with CH.
METHODS
A total of 203 cases were confirmed from 2012 to 2014 in Shadegan, with 66, 86, and 51 patients reported in 2012, 2013, and 2014, respectively. A total of 3,900, 3,991, and 4,050 live births occurred in 2012, 2013, and 2014, respectively. The controls (n=657) were selected using a random number table, and a case-control study was carried out to determine the risk factors for neonatal CH, including demographic, environmental, and medical factors.
RESULTS
The incidence of CH was 17.0 per 1,000 live births in 2012, 21.5 per 1,000 live births in 2013, and 12.6 per 1,000 live births in 2014. This study showed that the likelihood of CH in children born to parents with a history of consanguineous marriage was 2.41 times greater than in children born to parents with no such history (odds ratio, 2.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.65 to 3.53). This study also found that CH was 3.4 times more likely (95% CI, 2.29 to 5.20) in infants born in urban settings than in infants born in rural areas.
CONCLUSIONS
The incidence of CH in Shadegan from 2012 to 2014 was approximately 17 times greater than the expected incidence in Iran. CH was associated with a history of consanguineous marriage and urbanization.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Risk factors for transient and permanent congenital hypothyroidism: a population-based case-control study
    Fariba Abbasi, Leila Janani, Malihe Talebi, Hosein Azizi, Lotfali Hagiri, Shahnaz Rimaz
    Thyroid Research.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Pediatric Quality of Life in Congenital Hypothyroidism: an Indonesian Study
    Nur Rochmah, Muhammad Faizi, Carrina Dewanti, Ahmad Suryawan
    International Journal of Thyroidology.2020; 13(2): 150.     CrossRef
  • Doğumsal Hipotiroidi ile Ebeveyn Yaşı İlişkisi
    Hale TUHAN
    Turkish Journal of Pediatric Disease.2019; : 1.     CrossRef
  • The role of season and climate in the incidence of congenital hypothyroidism in Kerman province, Southeastern Iran
    Narges Khanjani, Ahmad Ahmadzadeh, Bahram Bakhtiari, Farzan Madadizadeh
    Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism.2017; 30(2): 149.     CrossRef
Risk factors for heart failure in a cohort of patients with newly diagnosed myocardial infarction: a matched, case-control study in Iran
Ali Ahmadi, Koorosh Etemad, Arsalan Khaledifar
Epidemiol Health. 2016;38:e2016019.   Published online May 17, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2016019
  • 20,017 View
  • 215 Download
  • 14 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Risk factors for heart failure (HF) have not yet been studied in myocardial infarction (MI) patients in Iran. This study was conducted to determine these risk factors.
METHODS
In this nationwide, hospital-based, case-control study, the participants were all new MI patients hospitalized from April 2012 to March 2013 in Iran. The data on 1,691 new cases with HF (enrolled by census sampling) were compared with the data of 6,764 patients without HF as controls. We randomly selected four controls per one case, matched on the date at MI and HF diagnosis, according to incidence density sampling. Using conditional logistic regression models, odds ratios (ORs) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated to identify potential risk factors.
RESULTS
The one-year in-hospital mortality rate was 18.2% in the cases and higher than in the controls (12.1%) (p<0.05). Significant risk factors for HF were: right bundle branch block (RBBB) (OR, 2.86; 95% CI, 1.95 to 4.19), stroke (OR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.39 to 2.89), and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.34 to 3.09). Diabetes, hypertension, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), atrial fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, and age were determined to be the factors significantly associated with HF incidence (p<0.05). The most important factor in women was diabetes (OR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.88). Age, hypertension, PCI, CABG, and RBBB were the most important factors in men.
CONCLUSIONS
Our findings may help to better identify and monitor the predictive risk factors for HF in MI patients. The pattern of risk factors was different in men and women.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Efficacy of a self-monitoring traffic light diary on outcomes of patients with heart failure: A randomized controlled trial
    Mahin Nomali, Ramin Mohammadrezaei, Mehdi Yaseri, Amirhossein Tayebi, Aryan Ayati, Gholamreza Roshandel, Abbasali Keshtkar, Shahrzad Ghiyasvandian, Kian Alipasandi, Hossein Navid, Masoumeh Zakerimoghadam
    International Journal of Nursing Studies.2024; 152: 104704.     CrossRef
  • The feasibility and acceptability of an early tele-palliative care intervention to improve quality of life in heart failure patients in Iran: A protocol for a randomized controlled trial
    Arvin Mirshahi, Shahrzad Ghiasvandian, Meysam Khoshavi, Seyed Mohammad Riahi, Ali Khanipour-Kencha, Marie Bakitas, J. Nicholas Dionne-Odom, Rachel Wells, Masoumeh Zakerimoghadam
    Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications.2023; 33: 101114.     CrossRef
  • Predictions of adherence to treatment in patients referred to the heart failure clinic of shahid rajaee hospital in Tehran
    Asma Shojaee, AmirVahedian Azimi, Nasim Naderi, MohammadMehdi Salaree, Fakhrudin Faizi
    Research in Cardiovascular Medicine.2023; 12(1): 8.     CrossRef
  • Impact of Teaching Social Problem-Solving Skills on Quality of Life of Patients with Congestive Heart Failure
    Sepideh Omidi, Keivan Kakabaraei, Asadollah Amiripour
    Jundishapur Journal of Health Sciences.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Medication Adherence and Health Literacy in Patients with Heart Failure: A Cross-Sectional Survey in Iran
    Soheila Rezaei, Fatemeh Vaezi, Golnaz Afzal, Nasim Naderi, Gholamhossein Mehralian
    HLRP: Health Literacy Research and Practice.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A prospective survey of atrial fibrillation management in Iran: Baseline results of the Iranian Registry of Atrial Fibrillation (IRAF)
    Mona Heidarali, Hooman Bakhshandeh, Reza Golpira, Amirfarjam Fazelifar, Abolfath Alizadeh‐Diz, Zahra Emkanjoo, Shabnam Madadi, Farzad Kamali, Majid Maleki, Gregory Y. H. Lip, Majid Haghjoo
    International Journal of Clinical Practice.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Gender based survival prediction models for heart failure patients: A case study in Pakistan
    Faisal Maqbool Zahid, Shakeela Ramzan, Shahla Faisal, Ijaz Hussain, Olalekan Uthman
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(2): e0210602.     CrossRef
  • Relationship of the ORBIT and HAS-BLED scores with Killip class 3-4 in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction
    Qing Zhang, Lei Zhou, Hong-Li Cai, Hui-He Lu
    Medicine.2019; 98(8): e14578.     CrossRef
  • Survival rate and predictors of mortality in patients hospitalised with heart failure: a cohort study on the data of Persian registry of cardiovascular disease (PROVE)
    Mahshid Givi, Davood Shafie, Fatemeh Nouri, Mohammad Garakyaraghi, Ghasem Yadegarfar, Nizal Sarrafzadegan
    Postgraduate Medical Journal.2018; 94(1112): 318.     CrossRef
  • Self-Monitoring by Traffic Light Color Coding Versus Usual Care on Outcomes of Patients With Heart Failure Reduced Ejection Fraction: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial
    Mahin Nomali, Ramin Mohammadrezaei, Abbas Ali Keshtkar, Gholamreza Roshandel, Shahrzad Ghiyasvandian, Kian Alipasandi, Masoumeh Zakerimoghadam
    JMIR Research Protocols.2018; 7(11): e184.     CrossRef
A cholera outbreak in Alborz Province, Iran: a matched case-control study
Ghobad Moradi, Mohammad Aziz Rasouli, Parvin Mohammadi, Elham Elahi, Hojatollah Barati
Epidemiol Health. 2016;38:e2016018.   Published online May 14, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2016018
  • 19,586 View
  • 254 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
A total of 229 confirmed cholera cases were reported in Alborz Province during an outbreak that lasted from June 2011 to August 2011. This study aimed to identify potential sources of transmission in order to determine suitable interventions in similar outbreaks. In other words, the lessons learned from this retrospective study can be utilized to manage future similar outbreaks.
METHODS
An age-matched and sex-matched case-control study was conducted during the outbreak. For each case, two control subjects were selected from the neighborhood. A case of cholera was defined as a bacteriologically confirmed case with signs and symptoms of cholera. This study was conducted from June 14, 2011 through August 23, 2011. The data were analyzed by calculating odds ratios (ORs) using the logistic regression method.
RESULTS
In this outbreak, 229 confirmed cholera cases were diagnosed. The following risk factors were found to be associated with cholera: consumption of unrefrigerated leftover food (OR, 3.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.72 to 5.41), consumption of vegetables and fruits in the previous three days (OR, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.95 to 3.89), and a history of traveling in the previous five days (OR, 5.31; 95% CI, 2.21 to 9.72).
CONCLUSIONS
Consumption of vegetables and fruits has remained an unresolved risk factor in cholera outbreaks in Iran in recent years. In order to reduce the risk of cholera, sanitary standards for fruits and vegetables should be observed at all points from production to consumption, the population should be educated regarding hygienic food storage during outbreaks, and sanitary standards should be maintained when traveling during cholera outbreaks.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Cholera outbreak at a city hotel in Kenya, 2017: a retrospective cohort study
    Philip Ngere, Elvis Oyugi, Alexis Niyomwungere, Scolastica Wabwire, Adi Dahabo, Daniel Langat, Raphael Muli, Maurice Owiny
    Journal of Interventional Epidemiology and Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Cholera outbreak investigation report in Mille woreda, Afar region, Ethiopia, 2019
    Hana Mekonen, Kefyalew Amene, Dr Samrawit Bisrat, Tesfahun Abye
    MOJ Women s Health.2022; 11(2): 63.     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors of Cholera Transmission in Al Hudaydah, Yemen: Case-Control Study
    Abdulqawi Mohammed Qaserah, Mohammed Abdullah Al Amad, Abdulwahed Abduljabbar Al Serouri, Yousef Saleh Khader
    JMIR Public Health and Surveillance.2021; 7(7): e27627.     CrossRef
  • Prevention and control of cholera with household and community water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions: A scoping review of current international guidelines
    Lauren D’Mello-Guyett, Karin Gallandat, Rafael Van den Bergh, Dawn Taylor, Gregory Bulit, Dominique Legros, Peter Maes, Francesco Checchi, Oliver Cumming, Andrew S. Azman
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(1): e0226549.     CrossRef
  • Risk factors associated with the recent cholera outbreak in Yemen: a case-control study
    Fekri Dureab, Albrecht Jahn, Johannes Krisam, Asma Dureab, Omer Zain, Sameh Al-Awlaqi, Olaf Müller
    Epidemiology and Health.2019; 41: e2019015.     CrossRef
  • Individual and household exposures associated with cholera transmission in case–control studies: a systematic review
    Matthew D. Phelps, Lone Simonsen, Peter K. M. Jensen
    Tropical Medicine & International Health.2019; 24(10): 1151.     CrossRef
  • Cholera case management in Harare City, 2018: are we doing the right things right?
    Govha Emmanuel, Paul Musarurwa, Christine Gabaza, Taurai Masango, Shambira Gerald, Gombe Tafara Notion, Juru Tsitsi Patience, Tshimanga Mufuta
    Journal of Interventional Epidemiology and Public Health .2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • H2S is a key antisecretory molecule against cholera toxin-induced diarrhoea in mice: Evidence for non-involvement of the AC/cAMP/PKA pathway and AMPK
    Francisca B.M. Sousa, Luan K.M. Souza, Nayara A. Sousa, Thiago S.L. Araújo, Simone de Araújo, Dvison M. Pacífico, Irismara S. Silva, Renan O. Silva, Lucas A.D. Nicolau, Fabiana M. Souza, Marcelo C. Filgueiras, Jefferson S. Oliveira, Marcellus H.L.P. Souza
    Nitric Oxide.2018; 76: 152.     CrossRef
  • Individual and Household Risk Factors for Symptomatic Cholera Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
    Aaron Richterman, Duarxy Rodcnel Sainvilien, Lauren Eberly, Louise C Ivers
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases.2018; 218(suppl_3): S154.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of two control groups for estimation of oral cholera vaccine effectiveness using a case-control study design
    Molly F. Franke, J. Gregory Jerome, Wilfredo R. Matias, Ralph Ternier, Isabelle J. Hilaire, Jason B. Harris, Louise C. Ivers
    Vaccine.2017; 35(43): 5819.     CrossRef
Exposure to pistachio pesticides and stillbirth: a case-control study
Saeid Razi, Mohsen Rezaeian, Fatemeh Ghani Dehkordi, Azita Manshoori, Reza Goujani, Reza Vazirinejad
Epidemiol Health. 2016;38:e2016016.   Published online April 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2016016
  • 16,308 View
  • 199 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Stillbirth is an undesirable outcome of pregnancy. In light of the increasing use of pesticides and growing concerns about the possible health effects of agricultural pesticides, we investigated the effect of exposure to pistachio pesticides on stillbirth in pregnant mothers.
METHODS
This case-control study was conducted in Rafsanjan, Iran from 2011 to 2012. A total of 125 females who had a recent stillbirth were included as the case group, and 250 controls were selected from females who had a recent live birth. For each case, two controls with the nearest propensity score to the case were selected. Data were collected using a protocol developed by the researcher that involved interviewing respondents and reviewing their medical records. Conditional multivariate and univariate logistic regression analysis were performed and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated.
RESULTS
The ORs of stillbirth in mothers living in pistachio gardens and those who were exposed to sprayed pesticides, in comparison to the controls, were 14.1 (95% CI, 3.3 to 63.4) and 5.0 (95% CI, 1.2 to 28.6), respectively. No significant differences were found in stillbirth rates according to the distance between the mother’s residence and a pistachio garden or involvement in agricultural activities.
CONCLUSIONS
The results of our study showed that exposure to pistachio pesticides during pregnancy may increase the likelihood of stillbirth in mothers.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Dietary zinc intake and body mass index as modifiers of the association between household pesticide exposure and infertility among US women: a population-level study
    Jungao Huang, Liqin Hu, Juan Yang
    Environmental Science and Pollution Research.2022; 30(8): 20327.     CrossRef
  • Glyphosate Herbicide: Reproductive Outcomes and Multigenerational Effects
    María Mercedes Milesi, Virginia Lorenz, Milena Durando, María Florencia Rossetti, Jorgelina Varayoud
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Pestizidrückstände in Gemüse und Obst und Outcome bei Frauen unter ART
    Constanze Banz-Jansen
    Gynäkologische Endokrinologie.2018; 16(2): 128.     CrossRef
  • Perinatal exposure to a glyphosate-based herbicide impairs female reproductive outcomes and induces second-generation adverse effects in Wistar rats
    María M. Milesi, Virginia Lorenz, Guillermina Pacini, María R. Repetti, Luisina D. Demonte, Jorgelina Varayoud, Enrique H. Luque
    Archives of Toxicology.2018; 92(8): 2629.     CrossRef
Risk factors for amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulcer in southwest Iran: a matched case-control study
Mohammad Kogani, Mohammad Ali Mansournia, Amin Doosti-Irani, Kourosh Holakouie-Naieni
Epidemiol Health. 2015;37:e2015044.   Published online October 5, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2015044
  • 19,421 View
  • 287 Download
  • 16 Web of Science
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Amputation is a multifactorial complication in diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors associated with amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulcers.
METHODS
This matched case-control study was conducted based on new cases of amputation from March 2012 to November 2014. We selected new cases who had undergone amputation, and the control group was chosen from the cities or areas where the cases resided. Each case was matched with two controls based on the duration of diabetes and location. Conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate the associations between potential risk factors and amputation.
RESULTS
A total of 131 cases were compared with 262 controls. The results of the adjusted model showed that sex (odds ratio [OR], 8.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.68 to 27.91), fewer than two hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) tests per year (OR, 13.97; 95% CI, 4.97 to 39.26), unsuitable shoes (OR, 5.50; 95% CI, 2.20 to 13.77), smoking (OR, 3.44; 95% CI, 1.45 to 8.13), and body mass index (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.41) were associated with amputation in diabetic patients.
CONCLUSIONS
The most important factors associated with amputation were females, irregular monitoring of HbA1c levels, improper footwear, and smoking. Developing educational programs and working to ensure a higher quality of care for diabetic patients are necessary steps to address these issues.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Prevalence and determinants of lower extremity amputations among type I and type II diabetic patients: A multicenter‐based study
    Lawrence Sena Tuglo
    International Wound Journal.2023; 20(4): 903.     CrossRef
  • The prevalence of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus in patients with type 2 diabetes: a multicenter cross-sectional study
    Monir Lorestanifar, Masoomeh Mosayebi Molasaraei, Reyhaneh Jashaninejad, Saman Khoshmanesh, Amin Doosti-Irani
    Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders.2023; 22(1): 787.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge and practice of diabetic foot care and the prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers among diabetic patients of selected hospitals in the Volta Region, Ghana
    Lawrence Sena Tuglo, Felix Kwasi Nyande, Percival Delali Agordoh, Eunice Berko Nartey, Zhongqin Pan, Lydia Logosu, Atsu Eyram Dei‐Hlorlewu, Desire Koku Haligah, Linda Osafo, Simon Taful, Minjie Chu
    International Wound Journal.2022; 19(3): 601.     CrossRef
  • Preventive foot self-care practice and associated factors among diabetic patients attending the university of Gondar comprehensive specialized referral hospital, Northwest Ethiopia, 2021
    Enyew Getaneh Mekonen, Tizita Gebeyehu Demssie
    BMC Endocrine Disorders.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Uso de tecnologías de información y comunicación para promover la autogestión de ulceras por pie diabético
    Ana Maria Murillo Salamanca, Alejandra María Alvarado-García
    Revista Cuidarte.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Common late complications of longitudinal forefoot amputations in neuropathic foot treatment
    Rodrigo Sousa Macedo, Lucas Sousa Macedo, Marcos Hideyo Sakaki, Rafael Barban Sposeto, Rafael Trevisan Ortiz, Marcos de Andrade Corsato, Alexandre Leme Godoy-Santos, Túlio Diniz Fernandes
    Journal of Wound Care.2021; 30(6): 498.     CrossRef
  • Biomechanical modelling of diabetic foot ulcers: A computational study
    Gurpreet Singh, Shubham Gupta, Arnab Chanda
    Journal of Biomechanics.2021; 127: 110699.     CrossRef
  • Prediction of diabetic foot ulcer progression: a computational study
    Shubham Gupta, Gurpreet Singh, Arnab Chanda
    Biomedical Physics & Engineering Express.2021; 7(6): 065020.     CrossRef
  • Predictors of Foot Ulcers Among Diabetic Patients at a Tertiary Care Center, Egypt
    Yasmine Samir Galal, Walaa Ahmed Khairy, Ahmed Taha, Tarek Tawfik Amin
    Risk Management and Healthcare Policy.2021; Volume 14: 3817.     CrossRef
  • Glycemic control and awareness of foot care indiabetic foot syndrome
    Ayten Guner Atayoglu, Ali Timucin Atayoglu, Rahime Ozgur, Hammad Khan
    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGY (Ukraine).2021; 17(3): 200.     CrossRef
  • Are arch‐conforming insoles a good fit for diabetic foot? Insole customized design by using finite element analysis
    Jianwei Niu, Jing Liu, Yanling Zheng, Linghua Ran, Zhigang Chang
    Human Factors and Ergonomics in Manufacturing & Service Industries.2020; 30(4): 303.     CrossRef
  • Foot care knowledge, attitudes and practices among patients with diabetic foot and amputation in St. Kitts and Nevis
    Gracelyn Hanley, Piao‐Yi Chiou, Chieh‐Yu Liu, Hui‐Mei Chen, Stefani Pfeiffer
    International Wound Journal.2020; 17(5): 1142.     CrossRef
  • Patient-level predictors of diabetes-related lower extremity amputations at a quaternary hospital in South Africa
    Sifiso Mtshali, Ozayr Mahomed, Manal S. Fawzy
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(10): e0240588.     CrossRef
  • Mobile phone text messaging to improve knowledge and practice of diabetic foot care in a developing country: Feasibility and outcomes
    Zeinab M. Hassan
    International Journal of Nursing Practice.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Differences in foot self-care and lifestyle between men and women with diabetes mellitus
    Mariana Angela Rossaneis, Maria do Carmo Fernandez Lourenço Haddad, Thaís Aidar de Freitas Mathias, Sonia Silva Marcon
    Revista Latino-Americana de Enfermagem.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
Predictors of miscarriage: a matched case-control study
Jalal Poorolajal, Parvin Cheraghi, Zahra Cheraghi, Masoomeh Ghahramani, Amin Doosti Irani
Epidemiol Health. 2014;36:e2014031.   Published online November 20, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2014031
  • 20,838 View
  • 201 Download
  • 12 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The risk factors for miscarriage vary across communities and countries. This study was conducted to investigate the predictors of miscarriage in the west of Iran.
METHODS
This matched case-control study was conducted in Hamadan Province from April 2013 to March 2014. Cases were selected from women who had a recent spontaneous abortion and controls were selected from women who had a recent live birth. Two controls were selected for every case and matched for date of pregnancy and area of residence. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis was performed and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated.
RESULTS
Five hundred fifty cases were compared with 1,091 controls. The OR of miscarriage was 1.58 (95% CI=1.30-1.92) for every five-year increase in age, 0.20 (95% CI=0.14-0.28) for every live birth, and 3.43 (95% CI=2.03-5.79) for a history of previous spontaneous abortion. Compared to nulliparous women, primiparous or multiparous women had an OR of 17.85 (95% CI=6.65-47.91) for miscarriage. There was a strong association between miscarriage and abnormal amniotic status (OR, 2.46; 95% CI, 0.46-13.09) and also abnormal placenta status (OR, 10.44; 95% CI, 0.95-114.92); however, these associations were not statistically significant. No significant associations were observed between miscarriage and body mass index, previous history of stillbirth, low birth weight, congenital anomaly, ectopic pregnancy, impaired thyroid function, or high blood pressure.
CONCLUSIONS
Our study suggests that miscarriage is a multifactorial outcome associated with several modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors that may vary among different communities.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Gestational lead exposure and its effects on fetal/infant development - A systematic review
    Aleksander Brandão Santana, Lídia Emmanuela Wiazowski Spelta, Joselin Valeska Martinez Sobalvarro, Márcia Helena Miranda Cardoso Podestá, Raphael Caio Tamborelli Garcia, Tiago Marques dos Reis, Larissa Helena Torres
    Reproductive Toxicology.2023; 117: 108342.     CrossRef
  • Pembangunan dan Pengesahan Instrumen Pengetahuan, Sikap dan Penghayatan Terhadap Unsur Tradisi Dalam Perlembagaan Persekutuan
    Khadijah Muda, Siti Nor Azhani Mohd Tohar, Khairul Anwar Johari Mastor, Nazri Muslim, Fazilah Idris, Siti Nor Baya Yacob
    Pertanika Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities.2023; 31(1): 183.     CrossRef
  • A Validation Study on the Frequency and Natural History of Miscarriages Using the Spanish Primary Care Database BIFAP
    Sara Sanchez Ortiz, Consuelo Huerta, Ana Llorente-García, Paloma Ortega, Paloma Astasio, Lucía Cea-Soriano
    Healthcare.2021; 9(5): 596.     CrossRef
  • Cytogenetic Analysis of Spontaneous Miscarriages Using Long-Term Culturing of Chorionic Villi
    Isao Horiuchi, Yu Wakimoto, Tomoyuki Kuwata, Hideaki Sawai, Hiroaki Shibahara, Kenjiro Takagi
    Journal of Fetal Medicine.2019; 06(01): 1.     CrossRef
  • Complications in Early Pregnancy
    Elizabeth Pontius, Julie T. Vieth
    Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America.2019; 37(2): 219.     CrossRef
  • Preconception Blood Pressure Levels and Reproductive Outcomes in a Prospective Cohort of Women Attempting Pregnancy
    Carrie J. Nobles, Pauline Mendola, Sunni L. Mumford, Ashley I. Naimi, Edwina H. Yeung, Keewan Kim, Hyojun Park, Brian Wilcox, Robert M. Silver, Neil J. Perkins, Lindsey Sjaarda, Enrique F. Schisterman
    Hypertension.2018; 71(5): 904.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological Survey and Risk Factor Analysis of Recurrent Spontaneous Miscarriages in Infertile Women at Large Infertility Centers
    Hai-Yan Wang, Jie Qiao, Xiao-Xi Sun, Shu-Yu Wang, Xiao-Yan Liang, Yun Sun, Feng-Hua Liu
    Chinese Medical Journal.2017; 130(17): 2056.     CrossRef
  • Maternal pre-pregnancy risk factors for miscarriage from a prevention perspective: a cohort study in China
    Huan Zhou, Yongping Liu, Lu Liu, Min Zhang, Xingzhi Chen, Yulong Qi
    European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology.2016; 206: 57.     CrossRef
  • Systematic review and meta-analysis on the association of prepregnancy underweight and miscarriage
    Montserrat Balsells, Apolonia García-Patterson, Rosa Corcoy
    European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology.2016; 207: 73.     CrossRef
  • Fasting blood glucose and newborn birth weight of non- diabetic Sudanese women
    Abdelmageed Elmugabil, Duria A. Rayis, Ishag Adam, Mohamed F. Lutfi
    F1000Research.2016; 5: 641.     CrossRef
Risk factors for maternal mortality in the west of Iran: a nested case-control study
Jalal Poorolajal, Behnaz Alafchi, Roya Najafi Vosoogh, Sahar Hamzeh, Masoomeh Ghahramani
Epidemiol Health. 2014;36:e2014028.   Published online November 8, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2014028
  • 18,268 View
  • 146 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
With a gradual decline in maternal mortality in recent years in Iran, this study was conducted to identify the remaining risk factors for maternal death.
METHODS
This 8-year nested case-control study was conducted in Hamadan Province, in the west of Iran, from April 2006 to March 2014. It included 185 women (37 cases and 148 controls). All maternal deaths that occurred during the study period were considered cases. For every case, four women with a live birth were selected as controls from the same area and date. Conditional logistic regression analysis was performed and the odds ratio (OR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were obtained for each risk factor.
RESULTS
The majority of cases were aged 20-34 years, died in hospital, and lived in urban areas. The most common causes of death were bleeding, systemic disease, infection, and pre-eclampsia. The OR estimate of maternal death was 8.48 (95% CI=1.26-56.99) for advanced maternal age (≥35 years); 2.10 (95% CI=0.07-65.43) for underweight and 10.99 (95% CI=1.65-73.22) for overweight or obese women compared to those with normal weight; 1.56 (95% CI=1.08-2.25) for every unit increase in gravidity compared to those with one gravidity; 1.73 (95% CI=0.34-8.88) for preterm labors compared to term labors; and 17.54 (95% CI= 2.71-113.42) for women with systemic diseases.
CONCLUSIONS
According to our results, advanced maternal age, abnormal body mass index, multiple gravidity, preterm labor, and systemic disease were the main risk factors for maternal death. However, more evidence based on large cohort studies in different settings is required to confirm our results.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A retrospective descriptive study of NANDA‐I nursing diagnoses used by midwives working in obstetrics and gynecologic service: An example from south‐eastern Turkey
    Yeşim Yeşil, Leyla Baran
    International Journal of Nursing Knowledge.2024; 35(2): 163.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological and Maternal Features of Maternal Mortality in the West of Iran: Hamadan, 2011-2019
    Azam Ali Shirzad, Ebrahim Jalili , Fatemeh Shahbazi, Hasan Bahrami, Salman Khazaei, Samereh Ghelichkhani
    Current Women s Health Reviews.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A systematic review of individual and ecological determinants of maternal mortality in the world based on the income level of countries
    Maryam Tajvar, Alireza Hajizadeh, Rostam Zalvand
    BMC Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Determinants and causes of maternal mortality in Iran based on ICD-MM: a systematic review
    Rostam Zalvand, Maryam Tajvar, Abolghasem Pourreza, Hadi Asheghi
    Reproductive Health.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Satisfaction with Natural Delivery Experience and its Related Factors in Rasht Women
    Mona Ghobadi, Tahereh Ziaee, Noshaz Mirhaghjo, Farzaneh Pazandeh, Ehsan Kazemnejad lili
    Journal of Health and Care.2018; 20(3): 215.     CrossRef
  • Predictors and measurement of satisfaction with postpartum care in a government hospital
    Simge Zeyneloğlu, Sezer Kısa, Hülya Özberk, Aysun Badem
    Nursing & Health Sciences.2017; 19(2): 198.     CrossRef
Predictors of tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus co-infection: a case-control study
Leila Molaeipoor, Jalal Poorolajal, Minoo Mohraz, Nader Esmailnasab
Epidemiol Health. 2014;36:e2014024.   Published online October 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2014024
  • 19,467 View
  • 184 Download
  • 25 Web of Science
  • 17 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis co-infection is a major global challenge. It is not clear why some HIV-positive people are co-infected with tuberculosis (TB) while others are not. This study addressed that question.
METHODS
This case-control study was conducted in Tehran, Iran in June 2004, enrolling 2,388 HIV-positive people. Cases were selected from those who were co-infected with TB and controls from those without TB. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the association between M. tuberculosis/HIV co-infection and several predictors. Odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated.
RESULTS
In this study, 241 cases were compared with 2,147 controls. Sex, age, marital status, educational level, imprisonment, smoking, narcotic use, route of HIV transmission, previous TB infection, isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT), antiretroviral therapy (ART), and low CD4 count (<350 cells/mm3) were independently associated with M. tuberculosis/HIV co-infection (p<0.001). However, after adjusting for all other variables in the model, only the association between M. tuberculosis/HIV co-infection and the following predictors remained statistically significant: imprisonment (odds ratio [OR], 3.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.11-6.90), previous TB infection (OR, 5.54; 95% CI, 1.99-15.39), IPT (OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.06-0.31), ART (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.26-2.61), and CD4 count <350 cells/mm3 (OR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.36-4.02).
CONCLUSIONS
Several predictors are associated with M. tuberculosis/HIV co-infection, but only a few indicators were significantly associated with M. tuberculosis/HIV co-infection. It is estimated that a number of predictors of M. tuberculosis/HIV co-infection remain unknown and require further investigation.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Joint Modeling of Longitudinal Outcome and Competing Risks: Application to HIV/AIDS Data
    Khadijeh Najafi Ghobadi, Hossein Mahjub, Jalal Poorolajal, Ebrahim Shakiba, Kaivan Khassi, Ghodratollah Roshanaei
    Journal of Research in Health Sciences.2023; 23(1): e00571.     CrossRef
  • Clinico-epidemiological Determinants of Tuberculosis Co-infection among Adults Attending an Antiretroviral Centre at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Madhya Pradesh
    Preeti Gupta, Akanksha Tomar, Manoj Bansal, Rajesh Kumar Gupta
    Journal of Medical Evidence.2023; 4(3): 220.     CrossRef
  • The Occurrence of Tuberculosis Infection among Newly HIV Diagnosed Patient in Indonesia
    Rengga Rusfa Gumilang, Dwi Wahyu Indriati, Diyantoro Diyantoro, Aliyah Siti Sundari
    Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences.2022; 10(A): 893.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Isoniazid Prophylaxis Therapy on the Prevention of Tuberculosis Incidence and Associated Factors Among HIV Infected Individuals in Northwest Ethiopia: Retrospective Cohort Study
    Mulat Addis Beshaw, Shitaye Alemu Balcha, Ayenew Molla Lakew
    HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care.2021; Volume 13: 617.     CrossRef
  • EFFICIENCY OF TREATMENT OF THE FIRST DETECTED TUBERCULOSIS DEPENDING ON THE HIV STATUS IN THE TUBERCULOSIS INSTITUTION OF THE FEDERAL PENITENTIARY SERVICE
    V. S. Borovitsky
    HIV Infection and Immunosuppressive Disorders.2020; 12(1): 83.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of Active Tuberculosis Occurrences after ART Initiation among Adult HIV-Positive Clients in West Showa Zone Public Hospitals, Ethiopia: A Case-Control Study
    Gerbaba Guta Nugus, Mergitu Eliyas Irena
    Advances in Public Health.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
  • Predictors of tuberculosis infection among adults visiting anti-retroviral treatment center at east and west Gojjam, northwest, Ethiopia, 2017
    Habtamu Belew, Moges Wubie, Getaye Tizazu, Abebaw Bitew, Tesfa Birlew
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Bayesian Spatial Survival Analysis of Duration to Cure among New Smear-Positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis (PTB) Patients in Iran, during 2011–2018
    Eisa Nazar, Hossein Baghishani, Hassan Doosti, Vahid Ghavami, Ehsan Aryan, Mahshid Nasehi, Saeid Sharafi, Habibollah Esmaily, Jamshid Yazdani Charati
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 18(1): 54.     CrossRef
  • Correlation Between Clinical Manifestation and Radiological Findings In Pulmonary Tuberculosis-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Coinfection Patients In Sanglah Hospital, Bali, Indonesia
    Putu Satyakumara Upadhana, Haikal Hamas Putra Iqra, I Gusti Agung Ayu Chintya Cahyarini, I Ketut Agus Somia, Pande Putu Yuli Anandasari
    Current HIV Research.2020; 18(6): 426.     CrossRef
  • THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS, COMBINED WITH HIV INFECTION IN THE TB FACILITY OF THE FEDERAL PENITENTIARY SERVICE, DEPENDING ON THE TYPE OF DRUG RESISTANCE OF THE PATHOGEN
    V. S. Borovitsky
    HIV Infection and Immunosuppressive Disorders.2019; 11(3): 64.     CrossRef
  • Multistate recursively imputed survival trees for time-to-event data analysis: an application to AIDS and mortality post-HIV infection data
    Leili Tapak, Michael R. Kosorok, Majid Sadeghifar, Omid Hamidi
    BMC Medical Research Methodology.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Identifying risk factors for progression to AIDS and mortality post-HIV infection using illness-death multistate model
    Omid Hamidi, Leili Tapak, Jalal Poorolajal, Payam Amini
    Clinical Epidemiology and Global Health.2017; 5(4): 163.     CrossRef
  • Treatment outcome of new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Hamadan, Iran: A registry-based cross-sectional study
    Salman Khazaei, Jafar Hassanzadeh, Shahab Rezaeian, Ebrahim Ghaderi, Somayeh Khazaei, Abdollah Mohammadian Hafshejani, Hamid Salehiniya, Ali Zahiri
    Egyptian Journal of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis.2016; 65(4): 825.     CrossRef
  • Survival rate of AIDS disease and mortality in HIV-infected patients: a meta-analysis
    J. Poorolajal, E. Hooshmand, H. Mahjub, N. Esmailnasab, E. Jenabi
    Public Health.2016; 139: 3.     CrossRef
  • Predictors of Tuberculosis in HIV/AIDS Patients Referred to Behavioral Diseases Consultation Center: A Registry-Based Study in Abadan, Southwest of Iran
    Salman Khazaei, Leila Molaeipoor, Shahab Rezaeian, Erfan Ayubi, Mehran Yari, Ali Asghar Valipour, Somayeh Khazaei
    Shiraz E-Medical Journal.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prisoners co‐infected with tuberculosis and HIV: a systematic review
    Chantal L Edge, Emma J King, Kate Dolan, Martin McKee
    Journal of the International AIDS Society.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Predictors of human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis co-infection
    Venkataramana Kandi
    Epidemiology and Health.2015; 37: e2015007.     CrossRef

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health