Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
12 "Ethiopia"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Original Articles
Recovery time from severe acute malnutrition and associated factors among under-5 children in Yekatit 12 Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a retrospective cohort study
Mekonen Adimasu, Girum Sebsibie, Fikrtemariam Abebe, Getaneh Baye, Kerebih Abere
Epidemiol Health. 2020;42:e2020003.   Published online February 2, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2020003
  • 13,085 View
  • 382 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Recovery time from severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is often a neglected topic despite its clinical impact. Although a few studies have examined nutritional recovery time, the length of hospitalization in those studies varied greatly. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the recovery time from SAM and to identify predictors of length of hospitalization among under-5 children.
METHODS
A retrospective cohort study was conducted among 423 under-5 children with SAM who had been admitted to Yekatit 12 Hospital. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate time to nutritional recovery, and Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was performed to determine independent predictors.
RESULTS
The nutritional recovery rate was 81.3%, and the median recovery time was 15.00 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.61 to 16.39). Age, daily weight gain per kilogram of body weight, vaccination status, and the existence of at least 1 comorbidity (e.g., pneumonia, stunting, shock, and deworming) were found to be significant independent predictors of nutritional recovery time. The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for nutritional recovery decreased by 1.9% for every 1-month increase in child age (aHR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.97 to 0.99).
CONCLUSIONS
The overall nutritional recovery time in this study was within the Sphere standards. However, approximately 13.0% of children stayed in the hospital for more than 28.00 days, which is an unacceptably large proportion. Daily weight gain of ≥8 g/kg, full vaccination, and deworming with albendazole or mebendazole reduced nutritional recovery time. Conversely, older age, pneumonia, stunting, and shock increased nutritional recovery time.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Time to recovery from severe acute malnutrition and its predictors among under five children admitted to therapeutic feeding units of general and referral hospitals in Tigray, Ethiopia, 2020: a prospective cohort study
    Gebretsadkan Fisseha Kidane, Kidane Zereabruk, Woldu Aberhe, Abrha Hailay, Guesh Mebrahtom, Gebreamlak Gebremedhn Gebremeskel, Teklehaimanot Gereziher Haile, Desalegn Massa Teklemichael
    BMC Pediatrics.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of malnutrition on the outcome and length of hospital stay in elective pediatric surgical patients: prospective cohort study at tertiary hospitals in Ethiopia
    Belachew D. Wondemagegnehu, Woubedel K. Aklilu, Milliard D. Beyene, Bareng A. Sanny Nonyane
    BMC Nutrition.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comorbidities of Child Malnutrition in Low- and Medium-Income Countries: A Systematic Review
    Tshepiso Moate, Tinda Rabie, Catharina Minnie, Anne Mäenpää
    Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition.2022; 75(4): 400.     CrossRef
  • Severe acute malnutrition’s recovery rate still below the minimum standard: predictors of time to recovery among 6- to 59-month-old children in the healthcare setting of Southwest Ethiopia
    Seyum Ebissa Eyi, Gebiso Roba Debele, Efrem Negash, Kebebe Bidira, Debela Tarecha, Kabtamu Nigussie, Mohammedamin Hajure, Mohammedjud Hassen Ahmed, Bilisumamulifna Tefera Kefeni
    Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Preparation and quality characterization of marine small pelagic fish powder: A novel ready-to-use nutritious food product for vulnerable populations
    Abdullah-Al Mamun, Shuva Bhowmik, Md. Shahid Sarwar, Sharmin Akter, Tanjina Pias, MUM Abu Zakaria, Md. Monirul Islam, Hillary Egna, Ford Evans, Md Abdul Wahab, Shakuntala Haraksingh Thilsted, David C. Little
    Measurement: Food.2022; 8: 100067.     CrossRef
  • Assessment, outcomes and implications of multiple anthropometric deficits in children
    Idzes Kundan, Rajalakshmi Nair, Shashwat Kulkarni, Aparna Deshpande, Raju Jotkar, Mrudula Phadke
    BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health.2021; 4(1): 267.     CrossRef
  • Risk factors for severe acute malnutrition among children aged 6–59 months: A community-based case-control study from Vellore, Southern India
    SamM David, RubyA Pricilla, SherinS Paul, Kuryan George, Anuradha Bose, JasminH Prasad
    Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care.2020; 9(5): 2237.     CrossRef
  • Time to Recovery and Its Predictors among Children 6–59 Months Admitted with Severe Acute Malnutrition to East Amhara Hospitals, Northeast Ethiopia: A Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study
    Telahun Kasa Tefera, Solomon Mekonnen Abebe, Melkamu Tamir Hunegnaw, Freezer Girma Mekasha
    Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
Incidence and predictors of tuberculosis among HIV-positive children at Adama Referral Hospital and Medical College, Oromia, Ethiopia: a retrospective follow-up study
Masino Tessu Beshir, Aklil Hailu Beyene, Kenean Getaneh Tlaye, Tefera Mulugeta Demelew
Epidemiol Health. 2019;41:e2019028.   Published online June 22, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2019028
  • 13,661 View
  • 335 Download
  • 11 Web of Science
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Tuberculosis (TB) is common in children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but its effect on the survival of HIV-infected children is not well understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the incidence and predictors of active TB among HIV-positive children at Adama Referral Hospital and Medical College, Oromia, Ethiopia.
METHODS
A retrospective study was conducted over 5 years using a checklist to gather data from 428 randomly selected pediatric patient charts. The checklist was adapted from the standardized antiretroviral therapy (ART) follow-up form currently used by the institution’s ART clinic. Data were analyzed by bivariate and multivariable analysis using Cox regression proportional hazards models, as appropriate. Survival was calculated and compared using the Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests.
RESULTS
Of the 466 charts reviewed, 428 patient records were included in the analysis. A total of 67 new TB cases were observed during the follow-up period. Hence, the incidence rate in this cohort was found to be 6.03 per 100 child-years of observation. A baseline hemoglobin level <10 g/dL (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 7.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03 to 48.15), moderate wasting (aHR, 2.86; 95% CI, 1.02 to 7.99), and not receiving isoniazid preventive therapy (aHR, 8.23; 95% CI, 2.11 to 32.06) were among the independent predictors of TB occurrence.
CONCLUSIONS
The incidence of TB was high, particularly in pre-ART patients receiving chronic care for HIV. Close followup of HIV-positive children is crucial to protect them against the development of TB. Initiating isoniazid preventive therapy, averting malnutrition, and managing anemia are also of significant importance.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Predictors of a high incidence of opportunistic infections among HIV-infected children receiving antiretroviral therapy at Amhara regional state comprehensive specialized hospitals, Ethiopia: A multicenter institution-based retrospective follow-up study
    Gebrehiwot Berie Mekonnen, Binyam Minuye Birhane, Melaku Tadege Engdaw, Wotetenesh Kindie, Amare Demsie Ayele, Amare Wondim
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological survival pattern, risk factors, and estimated time to develop tuberculosis after test and treat strategies declared for children living with human immune deficiency virus
    Dejen Tsegaye, Sintayehu Wude, Tsehay Kebede, Setamlak Adane, Tesfaye Shumet, Fassikaw Kebede
    Indian Journal of Tuberculosis.2023; 70: S89.     CrossRef
  • The incidence rate of tuberculosis and its associated factors among HIV-positive persons in Sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Temesgen Gebeyehu Wondmeneh, Ayal Tsegaye Mekonnen
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Incidence and predictors of tuberculosis among children receiving antiretroviral therapy in the Wolaita Zone: A retrospective cohort study
    Daneil Tekese, Desalegn Dawit, Behailu Hawulte, Hussein Mohammed, Fekede Asefa, Lemessa Oljira, Mohammed Feyisso Shaka
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(9): e0291502.     CrossRef
  • Incidence and Predictors of Pulmonary Tuberculosis among Children Who Received Antiretroviral Therapy (ART), Northwest Ethiopia: A Multicenter Historical Cohorts Study 2009–2019
    Fassikaw Kebede, Habtamu Tarekegn, Mulugeta Molla, Dube Jara, Abebe Abate, Maoshui Wang
    Journal of Tropical Medicine.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • Global trends, regional differences and age distribution for the incidence of HIV and tuberculosis co-infection from 1990 to 2019: results from the global burden of disease study 2019
    Yaping Wang, Wenzhan Jing, Jue Liu, Min Liu
    Infectious Diseases.2022; 54(11): 773.     CrossRef
  • Bayesian parametric modeling of time to tuberculosis co-infection of HIV/AIDS patients at Jimma Medical Center, Ethiopia
    Abdi Kenesa Umeta, Samuel Fikadu Yermosa, Abdisa G. Dufera
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Tuberculosis prevalence, incidence and prevention in a south african cohort of children living with HIV
    Gloria Ebelechukwu Anyalechi, Rommel Bain, Gurpreet Kindra, Mary Mogashoa, Nonzwakazi Sogaula, Anthony Mutiti, Stephen Arpadi, Emilia Rivadeneira, Elaine J Abrams, Chloe A Teasdale
    Journal of Tropical Pediatrics.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Survival and predictors of mortality among HIV-infected adults receiving ART in Hawassa comprehensive specialized hospital, Sidama regional state, Ethiopia
    Balta Bargude, Fanta Amanuel
    Journal of Advanced Pediatrics and Child Health.2022; 5(1): 042.     CrossRef
  • Anemia as a risk factor for tuberculosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Yemataw Gelaw, Zegeye Getaneh, Mulugeta Melku
    Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Incidence and predictors of tuberculosis among HIV patients after initiation of antiretroviral treatment in Ethiopia: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Melkalem Mamuye Azanaw, Nebiyu Mekonnen Derseh, Gebeyehu Shumuye Yetemegn, Dessie Abebaw Angaw
    Tropical Medicine and Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of Isoniazid Preventive Therapy on the Incidence of Tuberculosis among Seropositive Children Attending HIV/AIDS Care in Two General Hospitals, Northwest Ethiopia, 2021
    Fassikaw Kebede, Birhanu Kebede, Tsehay Kebede, Melaku Agmasu, Maoshui Wang
    Journal of Tropical Medicine.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Time to Develop and Predictors for Incidence of Tuberculosis among Children Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy
    Fassikaw Kebede, Tsehay Kebede, Birhanu Kebede, Abebe Abate, Dube Jara, Belete Negese, Tamrat Shaweno, Karl Drlica
    Tuberculosis Research and Treatment.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Effect of highly active antiretroviral treatment on TB incidence among HIV infected children and their clinical profile, retrospective cohort study, South West Ethiopia
    Firew Tiruneh, Yared Deyas
    Scientific Reports.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Prevalence of disrespect and abuse of women during child birth and associated factors in Bahir Dar town, Ethiopia
Biresaw Wassihun, Leul Deribe, Nadia Worede, Teklemariam Gultie
Epidemiol Health. 2018;40:e2018029.   Published online July 1, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2018029
  • 14,257 View
  • 412 Download
  • 37 Web of Science
  • 34 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Disrespect and abuse are an often-unacknowledged cause of maternal mortality and morbidity globally. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence and associated factors of disrespect and abuse of women during childbirth at a health facility in the town of Bahir Dar, Ethiopia.
METHODS
In this community-based cross-sectional study, 422 mothers were interviewed from March 1 to 30, 2017 using a systematic random sampling technique with the kth value of 23 calculated based on the number of households in each sub-city and the expected sample size from sub-cities. Data were collected using a structured face-to-face interview questionnaire. EpiData version 3.1 was used to code and enter data, which were analyzed using SPSS version 22. Descriptive statistics were calculated for each variable, and binary logistic regression analysis with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was carried out to determine the associations between predictor variables and outcome variables.
RESULTS
A total of 410 women participated in the study, with a response rate of 97.2%. The overall prevalence of disrespect and abuse was 67.1% (95% CI, 63.0 to 72.0). Disrespect and abuse were more prevalent in women with a monthly income less than 2,000 Ethiopian birr (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.74; 95% CI, 1.08 to 2.80), mothers who stayed in a health facility after delivery (aOR, 5.14; 95% CI, 2.23 to 11.82), those who received care at a governmental hospital (aOR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.15 to 5.40), and those who attended fewer than 4 antenatal care visits (aOR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.15 to 3.40).
CONCLUSIONS
The prevalence of disrespect and abuse was high in this study setting. To decrease the prevalence of this phenomenon, appropriate interventions should be designed, focusing on increasing the number of antenatal care visits, increasing the incomes of mothers, and improving the relationship between health workers and mothers during mothers’ stay at health facilities.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Level and correlates of disrespect and abuse among newborns in selected public hospitals of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
    Rediet Gezahegn, Abiy Seifu Estifanos
    Reproductive Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Understanding variation in person-centered maternity care: Results from a household survey of postpartum women in 6 regions of Ethiopia
    Elizabeth K. Stierman, Linnea A. Zimmerman, Solomon Shiferaw, Assefa Seme, Saifuddin Ahmed, Andreea A. Creanga
    AJOG Global Reports.2023; 3(1): 100140.     CrossRef
  • Respectful maternity care and associated factors among mothers who gave birth in three hospitals of Southwest Ethiopia: A cross-sectional study
    Amanuel Adugna, Kassa Kindie, Gossa Fetene Abebe
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Abuse and humiliation in the delivery room: Prevalence and associated factors of obstetric violence in Ghana
    Abena Asefuaba Yalley, Dare Abioye, Seth Christopher Yaw Appiah, Anke Hoeffler
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Obstetric Violence among Pregnant Jordanian Women: An Observational Study between the Private and Public Hospitals in Jordan
    Omar A. Azzam, Amer Mahmoud Sindiani, Maysa M. Eyalsalman, Mira K. Odeh, Kenda Y. AbedAlkareem, Sara A. Albanna, Elaf M. Abdulrahman, Weaam Q. Abukhadrah, Haitham O. Hazaimeh, Ashraf Ahmed Zaghloul, Samir S. Mahgoub
    Healthcare.2023; 11(5): 654.     CrossRef
  • Disrespect and abuse of women during childbirth at health facilities in Eastern Africa: systematic review and meta-analysis
    Natnael Atnafu Gebeyehu, Gtachew Asmare Adella, Kirubel Dagnaw Tegegne
    Frontiers in Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and factors associated with disrespect and abuse among women who delivered in a University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria
    Michael C. Ezeanochie, Ofure E. Yamah
    International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics.2023; 161(3): 685.     CrossRef
  • Impacts of disrespectful care and abusive care practices in maternity units and potential interventions to improve the quality of care in low‐ and middle‐income countries: A narrative review
    Ahamad Salman Amathullah, Mohamed Rishard, Yasaswi Walpita
    International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics.2023; 162(3): 847.     CrossRef
  • Validation of the person-centered maternity care scale at governmental health facilities in Cambodia
    Yuko Takahashi Naito, Rieko Fukuzawa, Togoobaatar Ganchimeg, Patience A. Afulani, Hirotsugu Aiga, Rattana Kim, Asako Takekuma Katsumata, Abera Mersha
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(7): e0288051.     CrossRef
  • A critical review: developing a birth integrity framework for epidemiological studies through meta-ethnography
    Stephanie Batram-Zantvoort, Lisa Wandschneider, Oliver Razum, Céline Miani
    BMC Women's Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Obstetric violence is a misnomer
    Frank A. Chervenak, Renee McLeod-Sordjan, Susan L. Pollet, Monique De Four Jones, Mollie R. Gordon, Adriann Combs, Eran Bornstein, Dawnette Lewis, Adi Katz, Ashley Warman, Amos Grünebaum
    American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • What factors are associated with forms of mistreatment during facility-based childbirth? A survey of referral health facilities in south-east Nigeria
    Ijeoma Nkem Okedo-Alex, Ifeyinwa Chizoba Akamike, Ugonna Igwilo, Chika Nwakanma Onwasigwe
    Journal of Biosocial Science.2022; 54(5): 776.     CrossRef
  • Respectful maternity care among laboring women in public hospitals of Benishangul Gumuz Region, Ethiopia: A mixed cross-sectional study with direct observations
    Bezabh Amsalu, Amanu Aragaw, Yitagesu Sintayehu, Alekaw Sema, Yalelet Belay, Getasew Tadese, Nigus Kassie, Alemu Guta, Abel Tibebu, Getahun Tiruye
    SAGE Open Medicine.2022; 10: 205031212210769.     CrossRef
  • Neglected and non-consented care during childbirth in public health facilities in Central Tigray, Ethiopia
    Elsa Tesfa Berhe, Hailay Abrha Gesesew, Paul R. Ward, Teferi Gebru Gebremeskel
    BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Baseline Thrombocytopenia and Disease Severity Among COVID-19 Patients, Tibebe Ghion Specialized Hospital COVID-19 Treatment Center, Northwest Ethiopia
    Fikir Asrie, Esayas Tekle, Yemataw Gelaw, Mulat Dagnew, Aschalew Gelaw, Markos Negash, Eyuel Kassa, Segenet Bizuneh, Dessalew Wudineh
    Journal of Blood Medicine.2022; Volume 13: 315.     CrossRef
  • Disrespect and abuse experienced by women giving birth in public health facilities of Eastern Ethiopia: a multicenter cross-sectional study
    Sintayehu Gebregziabher, Behailu Hawulte, Legesse Abera, Abel Tibebu Goshu
    Journal of International Medical Research.2022; 50(10): 030006052211300.     CrossRef
  • Compassionate and respectful maternity care for mothers who gave birth in public health facilities in North Gondar, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study
    Agerie Mengistie Zeleke, Gashaw Melkie Bayeh
    African Journal of Midwifery and Women's Health.2022; 16(3): 1.     CrossRef
  • “I Would Have Stayed Home if I Could Manage It Alone”: A Case Study of Ethiopian Mother Abandoned by Care Providers During Facility-Based Childbirth
    Yohannes Mehretie Adinew, Janet Kelly, Amy Marshall, Helen Hall
    International Journal of Women's Health.2021; Volume 13: 501.     CrossRef
  • Disrespect and abuse during facility‐based childbirth in central Ethiopia
    Yohannes Mehretie Adinew, Helen Hall, Amy Marshall, Janet Kelly
    Global Health Action.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Vaginal examinations and mistreatment of women during facility-based childbirth in health facilities: secondary analysis of labour observations in Ghana, Guinea and Nigeria
    Kwame Adu-Bonsaffoh, Hedieh Mehrtash, Chris Guure, Ernest Maya, Joshua P Vogel, Theresa Azonima Irinyenikan, Adeniyi Kolade Aderoba, Mamadou Dioulde Balde, Richard Adanu, Meghan A Bohren, Özge Tuncalp
    BMJ Global Health.2021; 5(Suppl 2): e006640.     CrossRef
  • Magnitude and associated factors of disrespect and abusive care among laboring mothers at public health facilities in Borena District, South Wollo, Ethiopia
    Mulusew Maldie, Gudina Egata, Muluken Genetu Chanie, Amare Muche, Reta Dewau, Nigusu Worku, Mamo Dereje Alemu, Gojjam Eshetie Ewunetie, Tesfaye Birhane, Elsabeth Addisu, Wolde Melese Ayele, Metadel Adane, Tanya Doherty
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(11): e0256951.     CrossRef
  • Respectful maternity care during labor and childbirth and associated factors among women who gave birth at health institutions in the West Shewa zone, Oromia region, Central Ethiopia
    Gizachew Abdissa Bulto, Dereje Bayissa Demissie, Abera Shibru Tulu
    BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Counteracting Abuse in Health Care: Evaluating a One-Year Drama Intervention with Staff in Sweden
    Anke Zbikowski, A. Jelmer Brüggemann, Barbro Wijma, Katarina Swahnberg
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(16): 5931.     CrossRef
  • Promoting respectful maternity care for adolescents in Ghana: a quasi-experimental study protocol
    Helen H. Habib, Kwasi Torpey, Ernest Tei Maya, Augustine Ankomah
    Reproductive Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Disrespect and abuse of women during the process of childbirth at health facilities in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Zemenu Yohannes Kassa, Berhan Tsegaye, Abebaw Abeje
    BMC International Health and Human Rights.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Determinants of person-centered maternity care at the selected health facilities of Dessie town, Northeastern, Ethiopia: community-based cross-sectional study
    Fentaw Teshome Dagnaw, Sofonyas Abebaw Tiruneh, Melkalem Mamuye Azanaw, Aragaw Tesfaw Desale, Melaku Tadege Engdaw
    BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Abuse and disrespectful care on women during access to antenatal care services and its implications in Ndola and Kitwe health facilities
    Herbert Tato Nyirenda, Tambulani Nyirenda, Nancy Choka, Paul Agina, Shiphrah Kuria, Rehema Chengo, Herbert B.C Nyirenda, Brenda Mubita
    Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare.2020; 26: 100554.     CrossRef
  • Disrespect and Abuse during Childbirth in Ethiopia: A Systematic Review
    Meresa Berwo Mengesha, Asgele Gebrekrstos Desta, Hayat Maeruf, Hagos Degefa Hidru, A.Seval Ozgu-Erdinc
    BioMed Research International.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
  • Community Versus Out‐of‐Hospital Birth: What's in a Name?
    Melissa Cheyney, Marit L. Bovbjerg, Lawrence Leeman, Saraswathi Vedam
    Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health.2019; 64(1): 9.     CrossRef
  • Disrespectful and abusive behavior during childbirth and maternity care in Ethiopia: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Zemenu Yohannes Kassa, Siraj Husen
    BMC Research Notes.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Disrespect and abuse during childbirth in Western Ethiopia: Should women continue to tolerate?
    Firew Tekle Bobo, Habtamu Kebebe Kasaye, Belachew Etana, Mirkuzie Woldie, Tesfaye Regassa Feyissa, Rakhi Dandona
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(6): e0217126.     CrossRef
  • Mistreatment of women in public health facilities of Ethiopia
    Ephrem D. Sheferaw, Young-Mi Kim, Thomas van den Akker, Jelle Stekelenburg
    Reproductive Health.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Obstetric violence and its associated factors among postnatal women in a Specialized Comprehensive Hospital, Amhara Region, Northwest Ethiopia
    Muhabaw Shumye Mihret
    BMC Research Notes.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • How women are treated during facility-based childbirth in four countries: a cross-sectional study with labour observations and community-based surveys
    Meghan A Bohren, Hedieh Mehrtash, Bukola Fawole, Thae Maung Maung, Mamadou Dioulde Balde, Ernest Maya, Soe Soe Thwin, Adeniyi K Aderoba, Joshua P Vogel, Theresa Azonima Irinyenikan, A Olusoji Adeyanju, Nwe Oo Mon, Kwame Adu-Bonsaffoh, Sihem Landoulsi, Chr
    The Lancet.2019; 394(10210): 1750.     CrossRef
Is inadequate play area in schools associated with overweight among students in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia? A comparative cross-sectional study
Tsedey Moges, Bereket Gebremichael, Solomon Shiferaw, Robel Yirgu
Epidemiol Health. 2018;40:e2018017.   Published online May 12, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2018017
  • 12,808 View
  • 250 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The prevalence of childhood obesity has more than doubled since it was formally recognized as a global epidemic in 1997. With the increasingly dwindling space for private schools in Ethiopia, unresolved concerns exist among the public regarding the possible effect of limited play areas in schools on overweight/obesity. This study intended to determine and compare the levels of overweight/obesity among adolescents in private schools with and without adequate play area in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
METHODS
A school-based comparative cross-sectional study was conducted among 1,276 adolescents. Twenty private schools were grouped into 2 groups based on the size of the play area. Data were collected using a pre-tested questionnaire and anthropometric measurements and analyzed using descriptive statistical tests and logistic regression.
RESULTS
The magnitude of overweight/obesity was significantly higher in schools with inadequate play area (19.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16.4 to 22.7) than in schools with adequate play area (14.6%; 95% CI, 11.9 to17.5). Inadequacy of the play area was also positively associated with overweight/obesity in the multiple logistic regression analysis (odds ratio [OR], 1.62; 95% CI, 1.05 to 2.51). Using private car transportation to and from school (OR, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.13 to 4.57), father’s educational status (secondary school and above: OR, 2.54; 95% CI, 1.14 to 5.62), and middle wealth quintile (OR, 2.54; 95% CI, 1.50 to 4.33) were other factors significantly associated with overweight/obesity.
CONCLUSIONS
Inadequate play area in schools was an important contributor to overweight/obesity. Sedentary behavior was also significantly associated with overweight/obesity.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Barriers and facilitators of physical activity among school attending adolescents in Lagos State, Nigeria: A qualitative study exploring views and experiences of decision‐makers in secondary schools
    Busola Adebusoye, Jo Leonardi‐Bee, Revati Phalkey, Kaushik Chattopadhyay
    Health Science Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A systematic review and meta-analysis of adolescent nutrition in Ethiopia: Transforming adolescent lives through nutrition (TALENT) initiative
    Mubarek Abera, Abdulhalik Workicho, Melkamu Berhane, Desta Hiko, Rahma Ali, Beakal Zinab, Abraham Haileamlak, Caroline Fall, Chiranjivi Adhikari
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(4): e0280784.     CrossRef
  • Overnutrition in adolescents and its associated factors in Dale district schools in Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study
    Beruk Berhanu Desalegn, Tona Zema Diddana, Alemneh Kabeta Daba, Tagel Alemu Tafese
    PeerJ.2023; 11: e16229.     CrossRef
  • Correlates of Sedentary Time Among Children and Adolescents in Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Sibhatu Biadgilign, Tennyson Mgutshini, Bereket Gebremichael, Demewoz Haile, Lioul Berhanu, Stanley Chitekwe, Peter Memiah
    Pediatric Exercise Science.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Association of built environment constructs and physical activity among children and adolescents in Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Busola Adebusoye, Kaushik Chattopadhyay, Winifred Ekezie, Revati Phalkey, Jo Leonardi-Bee
    JBI Evidence Synthesis.2022; 20(10): 2410.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and Associated Factors of Overweight and Obesity among High School Adolescents in Bahir Dar City, Northwest, Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Mulugebeya Worku, Zemichael Gizaw, Aysheshim Kassahun Belew, Alemakef Wagnew, Melkamu Tamir Hunegnaw, Chris I. Ardern
    Journal of Obesity.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Stakeholder analysis of childhood obesity prevention policies in Iran
    Shahnaz Taghizadeh, Rahim Khodayari Zarnag, Mahdieh Abbasalizad Farhangi
    Archives of Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Risk factors and morbidities associated with childhood obesity in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic scoping review
    Frederick Inkum Danquah, Monica Ansu-Mensah, Vitalis Bawontuo, Matilda Yeboah, Roseline H. Udoh, Mohammed Tahiru, Desmond Kuupiel
    BMC Nutrition.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence, incidence, and trends of childhood overweight/obesity in Sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic scoping review
    Frederick Inkum Danquah, Monica Ansu-Mensah, Vitalis Bawontuo, Matilda Yeboah, Desmond Kuupiel
    Archives of Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Distribution and larval breeding habitats of Aedes mosquito species in residential areas of northwest Ethiopia
Getachew Ferede, Moges Tiruneh, Ebba Abate, Wondmeneh Jemberie Kassa, Yitayih Wondimeneh, Demekech Damtie, Belay Tessema
Epidemiol Health. 2018;40:e2018015.   Published online April 23, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2018015
  • 14,534 View
  • 450 Download
  • 35 Web of Science
  • 34 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The <i>Aedes</i> mosquito is a vector for transmitting many arboviruses. Knowledge of the breeding habitat of this vector is vital for implementing appropriate interventions. Thus, this study was conducted to determine the breeding habitats and presence of <i>Aedes</i> mosquito species in the study areas.
METHODS
A house-to-house cross-sectional survey of <i>Aedes</i> mosquito breeding habitats was carried out in Metema and Humera, Ethiopia, in August 2017. All available water-holding containers present in and around houses were inspected for the presence of immature stages of <i>Aedes</i> mosquitoes, and they were collected and reared to the adult stage for species identification. In the larval survey, the house index, container index, and Breteau index were computed as risk indices.
RESULTS
Of the 384 houses surveyed for the presence of <i>Aedes</i> mosquito larval breeding, 98 were found to be positive for larvae. During the survey, a total of 566 containers were inspected, of which 186 were found to be infested with <i>Aedes</i> mosquito larvae, with a container index of 32.9, a house index of 25.5, and a Breteau index of 48.4. The most common <i>Aedes</i> mosquito breeding habitats were discarded tires (57.5%), followed by mud pots (30.0%). Of the 1,077 larvae and pupae collected and reared, <i>Aedes</i> <i>aegypti</i> (49.3%), Ae. vittatus (6.5%), and <i>Culex</i> species (44.2%) were identified.
CONCLUSIONS
Discarded tires were the most preferred breeding habitats for <i>Aedes</i> mosquitoes. Moreover, Ae. aegypti, the main vector of dengue and other arboviruses, was identified for the first time in this region, suggesting a high potential for arbovirus transmission in the study areas.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Dengue Dynamics: A Global Update
    Rabeya Yousuf, Md Wasek Salam, Shaima Akter, Susmita Sinha, Mainul Haque
    Advances in Human Biology.2024; 14(1): 5.     CrossRef
  • Breeding habitats, bionomics and phylogenetic analysis of Aedes aegypti and first detection of Culiseta longiareolata, and Ae. hirsutus in Somali Region, eastern Ethiopia
    Solomon Yared, Araya Gebressilasie, Amha Worku, Abas Mohammed, Isuru Gunarathna, Dhivya Rajamanickam, Elizabeth Waymire, Meshesha Balkew, Tamar E. Carter, Olle Terenius
    PLOS ONE.2024; 19(1): e0296406.     CrossRef
  • Using Machine Learning to Improve Vector Control, Public Health and Reduce Fragmentation of Urban Water Management
    Fernanda Klafke, Elisa Henning, Virginia Grace Barros
    Hygiene.2024; 4(1): 49.     CrossRef
  • Oil fly ash as a promise larvicide against the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes
    Hanan Abo El-Kassem Bosly, Numan Salah, Salama A. Salama, Rami Adel Pashameah, Abdu Saeed
    Acta Tropica.2023; 237: 106735.     CrossRef
  • Machine-based mosquito taxonomy with a lightweight network-fused efficient dual ConvNet with residual learning and Knowledge Distillation
    Francis Jesmar P. Montalbo
    Applied Soft Computing.2023; 133: 109913.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiology, biology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and diagnosis of dengue virus infection, and its trend in Ethiopia: a comprehensive literature review
    Biruk Zerfu, Tesfu Kassa, Mengistu Legesse
    Tropical Medicine and Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Metagenomic analysis of coastal Kenya female Aedes aegypti mosquito RNA metaviromes reveal presence of diverse insect specific viruses
    Donwilliams O. Omuoyo, Doris K. Nyamwaya, Everlyn Kamau, James N. Nyagwange, Henry K. Karanja, John N. Gitonga, Zaydah de Laurent, Jonathan C. Ngala, Johnson Kinyua, Martin K. Rono, Joseph M. Mwangangi, Charles N. Agoti, George M. Warimwe
    Wellcome Open Research.2023; 8: 136.     CrossRef
  • Solid waste management and Aedes aegypti infestation interconnections: A regression tree application
    Fernanda Klafke, Virgínia Grace Barros, Elisa Henning
    Waste Management & Research: The Journal for a Sustainable Circular Economy.2023; 41(11): 1684.     CrossRef
  • Use of unmanned ground vehicle systems in urbanized zones: A study of vector Mosquito surveillance in Kaohsiung
    Yu-Xuan Chen, Chao-Ying Pan, Bo-Yu Chen, Shu-Wen Jeng, Chun-Hong Chen, Joh-Jong Huang, Chaur-Dong Chen, Wei-Liang Liu, Pattamaporn Kittayapong
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2023; 17(6): e0011346.     CrossRef
  • Non-target effects of chemical malaria vector control on other biological and mechanical infectious disease vectors
    Ndey Bassin Jobe, Silvie Huijben, Krijn P Paaijmans
    The Lancet Planetary Health.2023; 7(8): e706.     CrossRef
  • Metagenomic analysis of coastal Kenya female Aedes aegypti mosquito RNA metaviromes reveal presence of diverse insect specific viruses
    Donwilliams O. Omuoyo, Doris K. Nyamwaya, Everlyn Kamau, James N. Nyagwange, Henry K. Karanja, John N. Gitonga, Zaydah de Laurent, Jonathan C. Ngala, Johnson Kinyua, Martin K. Rono, Joseph M. Mwangangi, Charles N. Agoti, George M. Warimwe
    Wellcome Open Research.2023; 8: 136.     CrossRef
  • Current Status of Omics Studies Elucidating the Features of Reproductive Biology in Blood-Feeding Insects
    Aditi Kulkarni, Frida Delgadillo, Sharan Gayathrinathan, Brian Grajeda, Sourav Roy
    Insects.2023; 14(10): 802.     CrossRef
  • Entomological risk assessment for transmission of arboviral diseases by Aedes mosquitoes in a domestic and forest site in Accra, Ghana
    Nukunu Etornam Akyea-Bobi, Jewelna Akorli, Millicent Opoku, Samuel Sowah Akporh, Godwin Kwame Amlalo, Joseph Harold Nyarko Osei, Kwadwo Kyereme Frempong, Sellase Pi-Bansa, Helena Anokyewaa Boakye, Mufeez Abudu, Esinam Abla Akorli, Dominic Acquah-Baidoo, R
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(12): e0295390.     CrossRef
  • Towards an Integrated Approach to Improve the Understanding of the Relationships Between Water-Borne Infections and Health Outcomes: Using Malaysia as a Detailed Case Study
    Jia Yee Ho, Amanda Anne Lavinya, Dominic Shuen Wei Kay, Cindy Ik Sing Lee, Ahmad Haikal Razmi, Claire L. Walsh, Michaela L. Goodson, Jeyanthy Eswaran
    Frontiers in Water.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The knowledge, attitude and practice of community people on dengue fever in Central Nepal: a cross-sectional study
    Parbati Phuyal, Isabelle Marie Kramer, Ulrich Kuch, Axel Magdeburg, David A Groneberg, Mandira Lamichhane Dhimal, Doreen Montag, Harapan Harapan, Edwin Wouters, Anjani Kumar Jha, Meghnath Dhimal, Ruth Müller
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of ecological factors and breeding habitat types on Culicine larvae occurrence and abundance in residential areas Southern Thailand
    Watcharee Ruairuen, Kanchanok Amnakmanee, Onpreeya Primprao, Tum Boonrod
    Acta Tropica.2022; 234: 106630.     CrossRef
  • Entomological survey of the potential vectors of Rift Valley fever virus and absence of detection of the virus genome from the vectors in various niches in the southern half of the Great Rift Valley of Ethiopia
    Megarsa Bedasa Jaleta, Mehari Tefera, Haileleul Negussie, Tesfaye Mulatu, Tsega Berhe, Fasika Belete, Bekele Yalew, Oda Gizaw, Golo Dabasa, Fufa Abunna, Fikru Regassa, Kebede Amenu, Samson Leta
    Veterinary Medicine and Science.2022; 8(6): 2716.     CrossRef
  • Human IgG responses to Aedes mosquito salivary peptide Nterm-34kDa and its comparison to Anopheles salivary antigen (gSG6-P1) IgG responses measured among individuals living in Lower Moshi, Tanzania
    Nancy A. Kassam, Daniel Laswai, Neema Kulaya, Robert D. Kaaya, Debora C. Kajeguka, Christentze Schmiegelow, Christian W. Wang, Michael Alifrangis, Reginald A. Kavishe, Nazarudin Safian
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(10): e0276437.     CrossRef
  • Region-specific improvisation on WHO case definition and environmental risk factors associated with dengue: a case–control analysis from Kerala, India
    Thekkumkara Surendran Anish, Mathew J Valamparampil, Arya Rahul, Prasanta Saini, Kannamkottapilly Chandrasekharan Prajitha, Meenu Maheswari Suresh, Aravind Reghukumar, N Pradeep Kumar
    Transactions of The Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Close-kin mark-recapture methods to estimate demographic parameters of mosquitoes
    Yogita Sharma, Jared B. Bennett, Gordana Rašić, John M. Marshall, Penny A. Hancock
    PLOS Computational Biology.2022; 18(12): e1010755.     CrossRef
  • Impact of physicochemical parameters of Aedes aegypti breeding habitats on mosquito productivity and the size of emerged adult mosquitoes in Ouagadougou City, Burkina Faso
    Wendegoudi Mathias Ouédraogo, Kobié Hyacinthe Toé, Aboubacar Sombié, Mafalda Viana, Clarisse Bougouma, Antoine Sanon, David Weetman, Philip J. McCall, Hirotaka Kanuka, Athanase Badolo
    Parasites & Vectors.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of Ecological Factors and Breeding Habitat Types on Mosquito Larvae Occurrence and Abundance in Residential Areas Southern Thailand
    Watcharee Ruairuen, Kanchanok Amnakmanee, Onpreeya Primprao, Tum Boonrod
    SSRN Electronic Journal .2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Another dengue fever outbreak in Eastern Ethiopia—An emerging public health threat
    Mulugeta Asefa Gutu, Alemayehu Bekele, Yimer Seid, Yusuf Mohammed, Fekadu Gemechu, Abyot Bekele Woyessa, Adamu Tayachew, Yohanis Dugasa, Lehageru Gizachew, Moti Idosa, Ryan E. Tokarz, David Sugerman, Elvina Viennet
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2021; 15(1): e0008992.     CrossRef
  • High Aedes spp. larval indices in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
    Francis Wat’senga Tezzo, Sylvie Fasine, Emile Manzambi Zola, Maria del Carmen Marquetti, Guillaume Binene Mbuka, Gillon Ilombe, Richard Mundeke Takasongo, Nathalie Smitz, Juan Andre Bisset, Wim Van Bortel, Veerle Vanlerberghe
    Parasites & Vectors.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Environmental Vector Control Practices among Households of Patients with Dengue Fever during the Epidemic of 2018 in Kerala, India
    Chintha Sujatha, Reshma Rajan Sudha, Sreejith Lalitha Krishnankutty, Prajitha Kannamkottapilly Chandrasekharan
    Journal of Evidence Based Medicine and Healthcare.2021; 8(02): 48.     CrossRef
  • A review exploring the overarching burden of Zika virus with emphasis on epidemiological case studies from Brazil
    Merve Tunali, Alexandro André Radin, Selma Başıbüyük, Anwar Musah, Iuri Valerio Graciano Borges, Orhan Yenigun, Aisha Aldosery, Patty Kostkova, Wellington P. dos Santos, Tiago Massoni, Livia Marcia Mosso Dutra, Giselle Machado Magalhaes Moreno, Clarisse L
    Environmental Science and Pollution Research.2021; 28(40): 55952.     CrossRef
  • Mechanisms and the Engineering Approaches for the Degradation of Microplastics
    Aziz-Ur-Rahim Bacha, Iqra Nabi, Liwu Zhang
    ACS ES&T Engineering.2021; 1(11): 1481.     CrossRef
  • Abundance and Updated Distribution of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) in Cabo Verde Archipelago: A Neglected Threat to Public Health
    Silvânia Da Veiga Leal, Isaias Baptista Fernandes Varela, Aderitow Augusto Lopes Gonçalves, Davidson Daniel Sousa Monteiro, Celivianne Marisia Ramos de Sousa, Maria da Luz Lima Mendonça, Adilson José De Pina, Maria João Alves, Hugo Costa Osório
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(4): 1291.     CrossRef
  • Spatial modelling of the infestation indices of Aedes aegypti: an innovative strategy for vector control actions in developing countries
    Ana Carolina Policarpo Cavalcante, Ricardo Alves de Olinda, Alexandrino Gomes, John Traxler, Matt Smith, Silvana Santos
    Parasites & Vectors.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Entomological surveillance with viral tracking demonstrates a migrated viral strain caused dengue epidemic in July, 2017 in Sri Lanka
    Gayan P. Withanage, Hapuarachchige C. Hapuarachchi, Sameera D. Viswakula, Y. I. Nilmini Silva Gunawardena, Menaka Hapugoda, Abdallah M. Samy
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(5): e0231408.     CrossRef
  • Entomofaunal survey and larvicidal activity of greener silver nanoparticles: A perspective for novel eco-friendly mosquito control
    Kuppusamy Elumalai, Shahid Mahboob, Khalid A. Al-Ghanim, Fahad Al-Misned, Jeganathan Pandiyan, Putta Muralidharan Kousik Baabu, Kaliyamoorthy Krishnappa, Marimuthu Govindarajan
    Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences.2020; 27(11): 2917.     CrossRef
  • A survey of tire-breeding mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Dominican Republic: Considerations about a pressing issue
    Mikel A. González, María Altagracia Rodríguez-Sosa, Yohan Enmanuel Vásquez-Bautista, Elizabeth del Carmen Rosario, Jesús Confesor Durán-Tiburcio, Pedro María Alarcón-Elbal
    Biomédica.2020; 40(3): 507.     CrossRef
  • Risk factors for Aedes aegypti household pupal persistence in longitudinal entomological household surveys in urban and rural Kenya
    Harun N. Ngugi, Sindiso Nyathi, Amy Krystosik, Bryson Ndenga, Joel O. Mbakaya, Peter Aswani, Peter S. Musunzaji, Lucy W. Irungu, Donal Bisanzio, Uriel Kitron, A. Desiree LaBeaud, Francis Mutuku
    Parasites & Vectors.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Sero-epidemiological study on Dengue fever virus in humans and camels at Upper Egypt
    Mostafa Osman Hussen, Amal S. M. Sayed, Mostafa F. N. Abushahba
    Veterinary World.2020; 13(12): 2618.     CrossRef
Prevalence of goiter and associated factors among schoolchildren in northeast Ethiopia
Emebet Tigabu, Kindie Bantie Bekele, Berihun Assefa Dachew
Epidemiol Health. 2017;39:e2017055.   Published online November 25, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2017055
  • 12,771 View
  • 300 Download
  • 12 Web of Science
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Goiter is a major public health problem, especially in developing countries such as Ethiopia. Hence, this study aimed to assess the prevalence and associated factors of goiter among children in Waghimra Zone, northeast Ethiopia.
METHODS
A cross-sectional study was conducted from April 8 to 25, 2015 in northeast Ethiopia. A multistage sampling method was used to select 454 schoolchildren. Data were collected using a pre-tested structured interviewer-administered questionnaire. Children were examined for the presence or absence of goiter based on the criteria of the United Nations Children’s Fund, International Council for the Control of Iodine Deficiency, and the World Health Organization. Salt samples from children’s homes were tested for iodine levels using a rapid iodized salt test kit. Data were entered into EpiInfo version 7 and exported to SPSS version 20 for analysis. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models were fitted, and adjusted odds ratio (aOR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were computed to determine the level of significance.
RESULTS
The prevalence of goiter was 62.1% (95% CI, 57.5 to 66.5%). Being female (aOR, 3.09; 95% CI, 1.57 to 6.08), having a family history of goiter (aOR, 5.18; 95% CI, 2.43 to 11.03), and using non-iodized salt (aOR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.12 to 4.38) were factors associated with goiter among schoolchildren.
CONCLUSIONS
The prevalence of goiter was high. Being female and having a family history of goiter increased the risk of goiter in children, but using iodized salt was protective. Therefore, we recommend ensuring universal access to iodized salt and increasing the awareness of the community of the importance of iodized salt utilization.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Excessive iodine status among school‐aged children in the State of Qatar: Results of the National Iodine Deficiency Disorder Survey
    Mohamed Hamad J. T. Al‐Thani, Salah Abdulla Sh. A. Alyafei, Kholoud Ateeq K. M. Al‐Motawaa, Shamseldin Ali Khalifa, Syed Hassan Bin Usman Shah, Benjamin Vinodson, Sureshbabu Kokku, Amit Mishra
    Public Health Challenges.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Availability of adequate iodized salt at household level in rural communities in Farta district, Northwest, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study
    Yalelet Fentaw Shiferaw, Wubshet Debebe Negash, Daniel Gashaneh Belay, Haileyesus Birhan, Desale Bihonegn Asmamaw
    BMC Nutrition.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical, Laboratory, and Ultrasound Related Diagnoses of Thyroid Disorders: Using a Family Medicine Center Data to Assess Thyroiditis and Thyroid Nodules in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia
    Malak A. Al-Shammari, Moataza M. Abdel Wahab, Nouf A. AlShamlan, Reem S. AlOmar, Abdullatif K. Althunyan, Layla M. Alghamdi, Adam Fahad Aldhawyan, Naheel A. AlAmer, Sara A. Elmaki, Omran Al Dandan
    Journal of Primary Care & Community Health.2022; 13: 215013192210953.     CrossRef
  • Mandatory Versus Voluntary Implementation of Salt Iodization Program for the Last Two Decades in Ethiopia: A Comparative Review of Existing Literatures
    Agize Asfaw, Dessalegn Tamiru, Tefera Belachew
    Food and Nutrition Bulletin.2022; 43(4): 500.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Goiter Among School-Aged Children in Ethiopia: Update of Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
    Yohannes Tekalegn, Kebebe Bekele, Biniyam Sahiledengle, Demelash Woldeyohannes
    Global Advances in Health and Medicine.2021; 10: 216495612098866.     CrossRef
  • Adequately Iodized Salt Utilization and Associated Factors among Households in Tach Armachio District, Northwest Ethiopia: A Community-Based Cross-Sectional Study
    Worku Mamo, Terefe Derso, Solomon Gedlu Nigatu, Karen L. Sweazea
    Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Goiter and Associated Factors Among Adolescents in Gazgibla District, Northeast Ethiopia
    Gebremedhin Gebremichael, Melake Demena, Gudina Egata, Berhe Gebremichael
    Global Advances in Health and Medicine.2020; 9: 216495612092362.     CrossRef
  • National incidence, prevalence and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) of common micronutrient deficiencies in Ethiopia from 1990 to 2017: estimates from the global burden of diseases study
    Hamid Yimam Hassen, Jemal Haider Ali, Seifu Hagos Gebreyesus, Bilal Shikur Endris, Awoke Misganaw Temesgen
    Global Health Action.2020; 13(1): 1776507.     CrossRef
  • Goiter and its associated factors among primary school children aged 6-12 years in Anchar district, Eastern Ethiopia
    Muzemil Muktar, Kedir Teji Roba, Bezatu Mengistie, Berhe Gebremichael, Adamu Belay Tessema, Meseret Woldeyohannes Kebede, Sun Young Lee
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(4): e0214927.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of goiter among children aged 8–10 in Binh Dinh province, Vietnam in 2016–2017
    Truong Quang Dat, Le Nguyen Huong Giang, Pham Van Bao, Nguyen Thi Hong Tuyen
    AIMS Public Health.2019; 6(2): 184.     CrossRef
  • Dietary pattern and its association with iodine deficiency among school children in southwest Ethiopia; A cross-sectional study
    Hamid Yimam Hassen, Melkamu Beyene, Jemal Haider Ali, Seth Adu-Afarwuah
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(8): e0221106.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of goiter among children in Ethiopia and associated factors: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Getenet Dessie, Desalegne Amare, Amare Belachew Dagnew, Henok Mulugeta, Dessalegn Haile Kassa, Ayenew Negesse, Getachew Mullu Kassa, Fasil Wagnew, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful Islam, Sahai Burrowes
    BMC Public Health.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
Effect of antiretroviral therapy on changes in the fertility intentions of human immunodeficiency virus-positive women in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a prospective follow-up study
Hussen Mekonnen, Fikre Enquselassie
Epidemiol Health. 2017;39:e2017028.   Published online July 16, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2017028
  • 11,488 View
  • 183 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
With access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are able to consider childbearing to a greater extent than previously. In many cases, ART has transformed their intentions to have children. The present study aimed to assess changes in fertility intentions 12 months after ART initiation among HIV-positive women in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
METHODS
An institution-based follow-up study was conducted among 360 HIV-positive women in Addis Ababa. A logistic regression model was used to assess the influence of socio-demographic, reproductive health, and clinical characteristics on changes in the fertility intentions of women.
RESULTS
Overall, 40.8% (147 of 360) of the women reported that they desired to have a child in the future at the baseline visit, while 48.3% (174 of 360) did so at the 12-month follow-up. The proportion of women who reported that they desired to have a child 12 months after ART initiation was higher among ART-initiated women (55.8%, 106 of 190) than ART-naïve women (40.0%, 68 of 170). The adjusted analysis indicated that a change in fertility intentions between baseline and the follow-up visit was significantly associated with ART use (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20 to 5.20) and marital status, with single (aOR, 5.33; 95% CI, 1.10 to 25.92) and married (aOR, 6.35; 95% CI, 1.44 to 27.99) women being more likely to report fertility intentions than divorced/widowed women.
CONCLUSIONS
ART use was a significant predictor of change in fertility intentions between the baseline and follow-up visit, which suggests that additional efforts are necessary to integrate family planning and HIV services to address the safe fertility goals of women in the study area.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Factors associated with pregnancy uptake decisions among seropositive HIV people receiving antiretroviral therapy in sub‐Saharan Africa: A systematic review
    Abdul Razak Doat, Roberta Mensima Amoah, Kennedy Diema Konlan, Kennedy Dodam Konlan, Juliana Asibi Abdulai, Margaret W. Kukeba, Iddrisu Mohammed, Joel Afram Saah
    Nursing Open.2022; 9(5): 2239.     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting Fertility Intention Among People Living with HIV in Kunming, China
    Yingwu Guo, Yingrong Du, Sanguan Lerkiatbundit, Jun Liu, Jingsong Bai, Yongrui Yang, Yin Yang, Aihui Wu, Virasakdi Chongsuvivatwong
    HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care.2022; Volume 14: 265.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and factors associated with fertility desire among people living with HIV: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Xiang Yan, Jie Du, GuoPing Ji, Joseph K.B. Matovu
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(3): e0248872.     CrossRef
  • Motivations to use hormonal contraceptive methods and condoms among HIV-positive and negative women randomized to a progestin contraceptive in Malawi: a qualitative study
    Agatha K. Bula, Kendra Hatfield-Timajchy, John Chapola, L. Chinula, Stacey A. Hurst, Athena P. Kourtis, J. H. Tang
    BMC Women's Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Human immunodeficiency virus and infertility treatment: an Ethics Committee opinion

    Fertility and Sterility.2021; 115(4): 860.     CrossRef
  • Societal and individual drivers of fertility desires and intentions among people living with HIV: a cross sectional study of HIV clinic attendees in Soweto, South Africa
    Penelope Chirambira, Sphiwe Madiba, Busisiwe Ntuli
    AIMS Public Health.2021; 9(1): 173.     CrossRef
  • Effect of HIV Infection and Antiretroviral Treatment on Pregnancy Rates in the Western Cape Province of South Africa
    Leigh F Johnson, Themba Mutemaringa, Alexa Heekes, Andrew Boulle
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases.2020; 221(12): 1953.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of Fertility Desire among Women Living with HIV in the Childbearing Age Attending Antiretroviral Therapy Clinic at Jimma University Medical Center, Southwest Ethiopia: A Facility-Based Case-Control Study
    Nigusie Shifera Aylie, Lelisa Sena Dadi, Eshetu Alemayehu, Mengistu Ayenew Mekonn
    International Journal of Reproductive Medicine.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
  • Risky Sexual Practice and Associated Factors Among Women Living with HIV/AIDS Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy at a PMTCT Clinic in Western Oromia, Ethiopia


    Bikila Balis
    HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care.2020; Volume 12: 739.     CrossRef
  • Health workers’ knowledge of safer conception and attitudes toward reproductive rights of HIV-infected couples in Kano, Nigeria
    Zubairu Iliyasu, Hadiza S Galadanci, Ahmad A Zubairu, Taiwo G Amole, Nadia A Sam-Agudu, Muktar H Aliyu
    International Health.2019; 11(6): 536.     CrossRef
Postpartum modern contraceptive use in northern Ethiopia: prevalence and associated factors
Teklehaymanot Huluf Abraha, Alemayehu Shimeka Teferra, Abebaw Addis Gelagay
Epidemiol Health. 2017;39:e2017012.   Published online March 20, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2017012
  • 22,194 View
  • 658 Download
  • 45 Web of Science
  • 39 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The postpartum period is a critical period for addressing widespread unmet needs in family planning and for reducing the risks of closely spaced pregnancies. However, contraception during the extended postpartum period has been underemphasized in Ethiopia. Therefore, this study aimed to assess postpartum modern contraceptive use among women in northern Ethiopia and to identify factors associated with modern contraceptive use in the postpartum period.
METHODS
A community based cross-sectional study was conducted from March to April, 2015. Data were entered using Epi Info version 7 and then exported into Stata version 12 for analysis. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models were fitted to identify the determinants of postpartum modern contraceptive use. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated, and p-values <0.05 were considered to indicate statistical significance.
RESULTS
Nearly half (48.0%) of women used modern contraceptives during the extended postpartum period. Postpartum modern contraceptive use was significantly associated with secondary and tertiary education levels (aOR, 4.25; 95% CI, 1.29 to 14.00; aOR, 5.36 ; 95% CI, 1.14 to 25.45, respectively), family planning counseling during prenatal and postnatal care (aOR, 5.72 ; 95% CI, 2.67, 12.28), having postnatal care (aOR, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.15 to 4.87), resuming sexual activity (aOR, 9.53; 95% CI, 3.74 to 24.27), and menses returning after birth (aOR, 6.35; 95% CI, 3.14 to 13.39). In addition, experiencing problems with previous contraceptive use was negatively associated with modern contraceptive use (aOR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.16 to 0.72).
CONCLUSIONS
Low rate of postpartum modern contraceptive use were found in the study area. Therefore, strengthening family planning counseling during antenatal and postnatal care visits, improving utilization of postnatal care services and improving women’s educational status are crucial steps for to enhance modern contraceptive use among postpartum women.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Factors associated with modern contraceptives uptake during the first year after birth in Ethiopia: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Gebi Husein Jima, Muhammedawel Kaso Kaso, R. G. Biesma-Blanco, Tegbar Yigzaw Sendekie, J. Stekelenburg, Dylan A Mordaunt
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(2): e0270055.     CrossRef
  • Timely initiation of postpartum contraceptive utilization in Sebata Hawas district, Ethiopia: A cross-sectional study
    Kamaria Ismael, Tesfaye Getachew Charkos, Meyrema Abdo, Kimiyo Kikuchi
    PLOS Global Public Health.2023; 3(1): e0001503.     CrossRef
  • Time to postpartum family planning initiation and its predictors among mothers coming for first measles vaccination at Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia, Dessie Model Clinic, Northeast Ethiopia: cox-regression model
    Bezawit Adane, Elsabeth Addisu, Melaku Yalew, Yitayish Damtie, Mastewal Arefaynie, Segenet Zewdie, Yitbarek Wasihun, Bereket Kefale
    Reproductive Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of contacts with health professionals on modern contraceptives uptake during the first 6 weeks after child birth: a prospective cohort study in Arsi Zone
    Gebi Husein Jima, Jelle Stekelenburg, Hailu Fekadu, Tegbar Yigzaw Sendekie, Regien Biesma
    Contraception and Reproductive Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The effect of maternal educational status, antenatal care and resumption of menses on postpartum contraceptive use in Ethiopia: systematic review and meta-analysis
    Natnael Atnafu Gebeyehu, Kirubel Dagnaw Tegegne, Mesfine Wudu Kassaw
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Postpartum family planning uptake in Uganda: findings from the lot quality assurance sampling survey
    Florence Nakaggwa, Derrick Kimuli, Kenneth Kasule, Justine Fay Katwesige, Denis Kintu, Rhobbinah Ssempebwa, Solome Sevume, Patrick Komakech, Norbert Mubiru, Baker Maggwa, Maria Augusta Carrasco, Norah Namuwenge, Rebecca N. Nsubuga, Barbara Amuron, Daraus
    Contraception and Reproductive Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Socio-demographic and antenatal care-related factors associated with early post-partum family planning use in Ethiopia: evidence from Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey 2016 data
    Melaku Hunie Asratie, Getayeneh Antehunegn Tesema, Dagmawi Chilot, Fantu Mamo Aragaw, Mehari Woldemariam Merid, Daniel Gashaneh Belay
    Frontiers in Global Women's Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Geospatial variations and determinants of contraceptive utilization among married reproductive age women in Ethiopia: spatial and multilevel analysis of Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey, 2019
    Bewuketu Terefe, Mihret Getnet, Yonas Akalu, Yitayeh Belsti, Mengistie Diress, Yibeltal Yismaw Gela, Amare Belete Getahun, Desalegn Anmut Bitew, Daniel Gashaneh Belay
    Frontiers in Global Women's Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Time to initiation of modern contraceptive method use after childbirth and its predictors in Southern Ethiopia: a retrospective follow-up study
    Erjabo Adinew Mugoro, Dejene Ermias Mekango, Tigist Alebachew Lule, Belayneh Hamdela Jena, Ermias Abera Turuse
    BMC Women's Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Determinants of contraceptive use among women 0–23 months postpartum in Kitui County, Kenya: A cross-sectional study
    Lilian Mutea, Immaculate Kathure, Damazo T. Kadengye, Sila Kimanzi, Daniel Wacira, Nelson Onyango, Hesborn Wao, Ajay Bailey
    PLOS Global Public Health.2022; 2(6): e0000482.     CrossRef
  • The role of family planning counselling during maternal and child health services in postpartum modern contraceptive uptake in Ethiopia: A national longitudinal study
    Kalayu Brhane Mruts, Gizachew A. Tessema, Amanuel Tesfay Gebremedhin, Jane A. Scott, Gavin Pereira, Julia Robinson
    PLOS Global Public Health.2022; 2(8): e0000563.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods utilization and associated factors among counseled mothers in immediate postpartum period at Jimma University medical center, Ethiopia
    Wariyo D. Arero, Woubishet G. Teka, Habtemu J. Hebo, Terefe Woyo, Belay Amare
    Contraception and Reproductive Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Time to initiate postpartum modern contraceptive use and predictors among women of reproductive age group in Dilla Town, Southern Ethiopia: a retrospective cohort study
    MaeregayehuTibo, Atnafu Adem, Azmach Dache
    Contraception and Reproductive Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors associated with utilization of modern postpartum family planing methods during the extended postpartum period among mothers who gave birth in the last 12 months at Injibara town, Northwest, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study
    Getachew Andualem, Almaz Aklilu, Getahun Belay, Wondu Feyisa, Fentahun Alemnew
    Contraception and Reproductive Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A study on initiation of postpartum family planning in India based on NFHS-4: does urban poor differ significantly from rural?
    Ujjaval Srivastava, Arvind Pandey, Pragya Singh, Kaushalendra Kumar Singh
    BMC Women's Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mapping evidence on postpartum modern family planning service uptake among women in Ethiopia: A scoping review
    Niguss Cherie, Mulumebet Abera, Gurmesa Tura
    Frontiers in Global Women's Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The unmet needs for modern family planning methods among postpartum women in Sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of the literature
    Jumaine Gahungu, Mariam Vahdaninia, Pramod R. Regmi
    Reproductive Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Contraceptive Use and Its Associated Factors among Women Who Gave Birth within 12 Months in Dubti Town, Pastoral Community, of Afar Region Northeast, Ethiopia
    Abdu Yimam, Girmatsion Fisseha, Mebrahtu Kalayu, Etsay Woldu Anbesu, Kaushik Maiti
    Journal of Pregnancy.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • How women's experiences and perceptions of care influence uptake of postnatal care across sub-Saharan Africa: a qualitative systematic review
    Caitlin Lythgoe, Kirsty Lowe, Mary McCauley, Hannah McCauley
    BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Long-acting reversible contraception utilization and associated factors among women in extended postpartum period in southern Ethiopia
    Yibeltal Mesfin, Abraham Wallelign
    Archives of Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Explicative factors of the low uptake of modern contraceptives practice among women of childbearing age in Kumbo West Health District, North West Region, Cameroon
    Pierre Marie Tebeu, Edward Dubila, Jean Pierre Ngou Mve Ngou, Theophile Nana Njamen, Jesse Saint Saba Antaon, Eugene Kongnyuy
    Obstetrics & Gynecology International Journal.2021; 12(4): 256.     CrossRef
  • Postpartum Contraceptive Use and Its Determinants in Ethiopia: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
    Tsegaye Mehare, Birhanie Mekuriaw, Zelalem Belayneh, Yewbmirt Sharew
    International Journal of Reproductive Medicine.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
  • Predictors of puerperal menstruation
    George Uchenna Eleje, Emmanuel Onyebuchi Ugwu, Victor Okey Dinwoke, Perpetua Kelechi Enyinna, Joseph Tochukwu Enebe, Innocent Igwebueze Okafor, Livinus Nnanyere Onah, Osita Samuel Umeononihu, Chukwudi Celestine Obiora, Sylvester Onuegbunam Nweze, Ekene Ag
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(7): e0235888.     CrossRef
  • Factors associated with modern contraceptives use among postpartum women in Bukombe district, Geita region, Tanzania
    Michael Johnson Mahande, Emmanuel Shayo, Caroline Amour, Gerry Mshana, Sia Msuya, Michelle L. Munro-Kramer
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(10): e0239903.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and factors associated with postpartum use of long-acting reversible contraception in Bukombe District, Geita Region, Tanzania: a community- based study
    Kiondo Solomon Kiondo, Eusebious Maro, Sophia Kiwango, Julius Pius Alloyce, Benjamin C. Shayo, Michael Johnson Mahande
    Contraception and Reproductive Medicine.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Postpartum modern contraception utilization and its determinants in Ethiopia: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Bizuneh Wakuma, Getu Mosisa, Werku Etafa, Diriba Mulisa, Tadesse Tolossa, Getahun Fetensa, Merga Besho, Mohammed Gebre, Reta Tsegaye, Sarah Rachel Blackstone
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(12): e0243776.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, Utilization and Associated Factors of Postpartum Family Planning Among Women Who Had Delivered a Baby in the Past Year in Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia
    Benyam Seifu, Delelegn Yilma, Workinesh Daba
    Open Access Journal of Contraception.2020; Volume 11: 167.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with Compliance with the Recommended Frequency of Postnatal Care Services in Four Rural Districts of Tigray Region, North Ethiopia
    Teklehaymanot Huluf Abraha, Berhe Beyene Gebrezgiabher, Berihu Gidey Aregawi, Desta Siyoum Belay, Lidiya Tsegay Tikue, Ermyas Brhane Reda
    Korean Journal of Family Medicine.2019; 40(5): 329.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of post partum modern family planning utilization and associated factors among postpartum mothers in Debre Tabor town, North West Ethiopia, 2018
    Eden Bishaw Taye, Dawit Gebeyehu Mekonen, Tibeb Zena Debele
    BMC Research Notes.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Determinants of modern contraceptive use among postpartum women in two health facilities in urban Ghana: a cross-sectional study
    Jonathan Ian Coomson, Abubakar Manu
    Contraception and Reproductive Medicine.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A systematic review and meta-analysis of postpartum contraceptive use among women in low- and middle-income countries
    Rubee Dev, Pamela Kohler, Molly Feder, Jennifer A. Unger, Nancy F. Woods, Alison L. Drake
    Reproductive Health.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of integrating maternal health services and family planning services on postpartum family planning behavior in Ethiopia: results from a longitudinal survey
    Linnea A. Zimmerman, Yuanyuan Yi, Mahari Yihdego, Solomon Abrha, Solomon Shiferaw, Assefa Seme, Saifuddin Ahmed
    BMC Public Health.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Intentions on contraception use and its associated factors among postpartum women in Aksum town, Tigray region, northern Ethiopia: a community-based cross- sectional study
    Teklehaymanot Huluf Abraha, Hailay Siyum Belay, Getachew Mebrahtu Welay
    Reproductive Health.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Family planning use and its associated factors among women in the extended postpartum period in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
    Almaz Yirga Gebremedhin, Yigzaw Kebede, Abebaw Addis Gelagay, Yohannes Ayanaw Habitu
    Contraception and Reproductive Medicine.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between skilled maternal healthcare and postpartum contraceptive use in Ethiopia
    Gizachew Assefa Tessema, Tensae Tadesse Mekonnen, Zelalem Birhanu Mengesha, Katherine Tumlinson
    BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Predictors of postpartum contraceptive use in rural Tigray region, northern Ethiopia: a multilevel analysis
    Teklehaymanot Huluf Abraha, Berhe Beyene Gebrezgiabher, Berihu Gidey Aregawi, Desta Siyoum Belay, Lidiya Tsegay Tikue, Getachew Mebrahtu Welay
    BMC Public Health.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Modern contraceptive use and associated factors among married women in Finote Selam town Northwest Ethiopia: a community based cross-sectional study
    Alehegn Bishaw Geremew, Abebaw Addis Gelagay
    Women's Midlife Health.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Counseling on family planning during ANC service increases the likelihood of postpartum family planning use in Bahir Dar City Administration, Northwest Ethiopia: a prospective follow up study
    Tadese Ejigu Tafere, Mesganaw Fanthahun Afework, Alemayehu Worku Yalew
    Contraception and Reproductive Medicine.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Postpartum modern contraceptive use in northern Ethiopia: prevalence and associated factors - methodological issues in this cross-sectional study
    Kamyar Mansori, Shiva Mansouri Hanis, Fatemeh Khosravi Shadmani
    Epidemiology and Health.2017; 39: e2017019.     CrossRef
Visceral leishmaniasis treatment outcome and its determinants in northwest Ethiopia
Getachew Mebrahtu Welay, Kefyalew Addis Alene, Berihun Assefa Dachew
Epidemiol Health. 2017;39:e2017001.   Published online December 28, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2017001
  • 15,951 View
  • 378 Download
  • 16 Web of Science
  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Poor treatment outcomes of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) are responsible for the high mortality rate of this condition in resource-limited settings such as Ethiopia. This study aimed to identify the proportion of poor VL treatment outcomes in northwest Ethiopia and to evaluate the determinants associated with poor outcomes.
METHODS
A hospital-based retrospective study was conducted among 595 VL patients who were admitted to Kahsay Abera Hospital in northwest Ethiopia from October 2010 to April 2013. Data were entered into Epi Info version 7.0 and exported to SPSS version 20 for analysis. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models were fitted to identify the determinants of VL treatment outcomes. Adjusted odds ratio (aORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used, and p-values <0.05 were considered to indicate statistical significance.
RESULTS
The proportion of poor treatment outcomes was 23.7%. Late diagnosis (≥29 days) (aOR, 4.34; 95% CI, 2.22 to 8.46), severe illness at admission (inability to walk) (aOR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.06 to 2.40) and coinfection with VL and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (aOR, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.40 to 5.20) were found to be determinants of poor VL treatment outcomes.
CONCLUSIONS
Poor treatment outcomes, such as death, treatment failure, and non-adherence, were found to be common. Special attention must be paid to severely ill and VL/HIV-coinfected patients. To improve VL treatment outcomes, the early diagnosis and treatment of VL patients is recommended.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Hematological and Clinical Features Associated with Initial Poor Treatment Outcomes in Visceral Leishmaniasis Patients with and without HIV Coinfection in Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia
    Muluneh Ademe, Yaneth Osorio, Rawliegh Howe, Saba Atnafu, Tadele Mulaw, Helina Fikre, Bruno L. Travi, Asrat Hailu, Peter C. Melby, Tamrat Abebe
    Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease.2023; 8(1): 36.     CrossRef
  • Fever of unknown origin and splenomegaly: a case report of visceral leishmaniasis diagnosed by metagenomic next-generation sequencing
    Lan-Qing Li, Yiju He, Ting Liu, Jing Zhou, En-Qiang Chen
    Future Microbiology.2023; 18(11): 699.     CrossRef
  • Trend of Visceral Leishmaniasis at Medicine Sans Frontier’s Abdurafi Treatment Center, West Armachiho District, Ethiopia, 2009-2015, a retrospective descriptive analysis
    Sisay Awoke, Sefonias Getachew, Yimer Seid, Tatek Bogale
    Journal of Interventional Epidemiology and Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Zoonotic Diseases in the eastern region of the Iraqi capital, between 2010-2016
    A S Barrak, O A Saeed, MTA Mohammed
    IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science.2021; 779(1): 012008.     CrossRef
  • Inequalities of visceral leishmaniasis case-fatality in Brazil: A multilevel modeling considering space, time, individual and contextual factors
    Gláucia Cota, Astrid Christine Erber, Eva Schernhammer, Taynãna Cesar Simões, Alberto Novaes Ramos
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2021; 15(7): e0009567.     CrossRef
  • Efficacy and safety of a combined treatment of sodium stibogluconate at 20mg/kg/day with upper maximum daily dose limit of 850mg and Paromomycin 15mg/kg/day in HIV negative visceral leishmaniasis patients. A retrospective study, northwest Ethiopia
    Aschalew Tamiru, Rezika Mohammed, Saba Atnafu, Girmay Medhin, Asrat Hailu, Peter C. Melby
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2021; 15(8): e0009713.     CrossRef
  • Bioprospecting marine actinomycetes for antileishmanial drugs: current perspectives and future prospects
    O.F. Davies-Bolorunduro, O. Osuolale, S. Saibu, I.A. Adeleye, N.S. Aminah
    Heliyon.2021; 7(8): e07710.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence estimates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among visceral leishmaniasis infected people in Northwest Ethiopia: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Mehdi Mohebali, Yonas Yimam
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Incidence of Mortality and Its Predictors Among Adult Visceral Leishmaniasis Patients at the University of Gondar Hospital: A Retrospective Cohort Study


    Yigizie Yeshaw, Adino Tesfahun Tsegaye, Solomon Gedlu Nigatu
    Infection and Drug Resistance.2020; Volume 13: 881.     CrossRef
  • Infectivity and Drug Susceptibility Profiling of Different Leishmania-Host Cell Combinations
    Kyung-Hwa Baek, Laura Piel, Thibault Rosazza, Eric Prina, Gerald F. Späth, Joo Hwan No
    Pathogens.2020; 9(5): 393.     CrossRef
  • Discovery of novel hit compounds with broad activity against visceral and cutaneous Leishmania species by comparative phenotypic screening
    S. Lamotte, N. Aulner, G. F. Späth, E. Prina
    Scientific Reports.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Visceral Leishmaniasis Treatment Outcome and Associated Factors in Northern Ethiopia
    Kidu Gidey, Desalegn Belay, Berhane Yohannes Hailu, Tesfaye Dessale Kassa, Yirga Legesse Niriayo
    BioMed Research International.2019; 2019: 1.     CrossRef
  • Relationship of Serum Antileishmanial Antibody With Development of Visceral Leishmaniasis, Post-kala-azar Dermal Leishmaniasis and Visceral Leishmaniasis Relapse
    Dinesh Mondal, Prakash Ghosh, Rajashree Chowdhury, Christine Halleux, Jose A. Ruiz-Postigo, Abdul Alim, Faria Hossain, Md Anik Ashfaq Khan, Rupen Nath, Malcolm S. Duthie, Axel Kroeger, Greg Matlashewski, Daniel Argaw, Piero Olliaro
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Cutaneous leishmaniasis a neglected tropical disease: community knowledge, attitude and practices in an endemic area, Northwest Ethiopia
    Helina Fikre Tamiru, Yohana James Mashalla, Rezika Mohammed, Gloria Thupayagale Tshweneagae
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The criminal association of Leishmania parasites and viruses
    Matteo Rossi, Nicolas Fasel
    Current Opinion in Microbiology.2018; 46: 65.     CrossRef
  • Leishmaniasis in Ethiopia: A systematic review and meta-analysis of prevalence in animals and humans
    Ayalew Assefa
    Heliyon.2018; 4(8): e00723.     CrossRef
  • Treatment outcomes of visceral leishmaniasis in Ethiopia from 2001 to 2017: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Eyob Alemayehu Gebreyohannes, Akshaya Srikanth Bhagvathula, Tadesse Melaku Abegaz, Mohammed Assen Seid
    Infectious Diseases of Poverty.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A preliminary survey of major diseases of ruminants and management practices in Western Tigray province, northern Ethiopia
    Getachew Mebrahtu Welay, Dawit Gebremichael Tedla, Gebreyohans Gebru Teklu, Shishay Kahsay Weldearegay, Mearg Belay Shibeshi, Haftom Hadush Kidane, Berhe Beyene Gebrezgiabher, Teklehaymanot Huluf Abraha
    BMC Veterinary Research.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
Survival and predictors of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus patients on anti-retroviral treatment at Jinka Hospital, South Omo, Ethiopia: a six years retrospective cohort study
Erdaw Tachbele, Gobena Ameni
Epidemiol Health. 2016;38:e2016049.   Published online November 6, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2016049
  • 15,114 View
  • 364 Download
  • 23 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The survival rate of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receiving treatment in Ethiopia is poorly understood. This study aimed to determine the survival rate and predictors of mortality among HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy (ART) at Jinka Hospital, South Omo, Ethiopia.
METHODS
A 6-year retrospective cohort study was conducted using 350 patient records drawn from 1,899 patients on ART at Jinka Hospital from September 2010 to August 2015. The data were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier statistics and Cox regression models.
RESULTS
Of the 350 study participants, 315 (90.0%) were censored and 35 (10.0%) died. Twenty-two (62.9%) of the deaths occurred during the first year of treatment. The total follow-up encompassed 1,995 person-years, with an incidence rate of 1.75 deaths per 100 person-years. The mean survival time of patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was 30.84±19.57 months. The overall survival of patients on HAART was 64.00% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61.85 to 66.21%) at 72 months of follow-up. The significant predictors of mortality included non-disclosure of HIV status (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 5.82; 95% CI, 1.91 to 17.72), a history of tuberculosis (aHR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.41 to 3.51), and ambulatory (aHR, 2.97; 95% CI, 1.20 to 8.86) or bedridden (aHR, 4.67; 95% CI, 1.30 to 17.27) functional status, World Health Organization (WHO) clinical stage IV illness (aHR, 24.97; 95% CI, 2.75 to 26.45), and substance abusers (aHR, 3.72; 95% CI, 1.39 to 9.97).
CONCLUSIONS
Patients with a history of tuberculosis treatment, ambulatory or bedridden functional status, or advanced WHO clinical stage disease, as well substance abusers, should be carefully monitored, particularly in the first few months after initiating antiretroviral therapy. Patients should also be encouraged to disclose their status to their relatives.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Predictors of Survival Time Among HIV-Infected Adults After Initiating Anti-Retroviral Therapy in Kombolcha Town: A 5-Year Retrospective Cohort Study
    Muhammed Siraj, Sisay Gedamu, Belachew Tegegne
    HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care.2022; Volume 14: 181.     CrossRef
  • Survival and predictors of mortality among HIV-infected adults receiving ART in Hawassa comprehensive specialized hospital, Sidama regional state, Ethiopia
    Balta Bargude, Fanta Amanuel
    Journal of Advanced Pediatrics and Child Health.2022; 5(1): 042.     CrossRef
  • Incidence of Mortality and Its Predictors Among HIV Positive Adults on Antiretroviral Therapy in University of Gondar Comprehensive Specialized Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia
    Achamyeleh Birhanu Teshale, Adino Tesfahun Tsegaye, Haileab Fekadu Wolde
    HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care.2021; Volume 13: 31.     CrossRef
  • Statistical Joint Modeling for Predicting the Association of CD4 Measurement and Time to Death of People Living with HIV Who Enrolled in ART, Southwest Ethiopia
    Firew Tiruneh, Lalisa Chewaka, Dinaol Abdissa
    HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care.2021; Volume 13: 73.     CrossRef
  • Rate and Predictors of Mortality Among Adults on Antiretroviral Therapy at Debre Markos Referral Hospital, North West Ethiopia
    Haddis Birhanu, Atsede Alle, Molla Yigzaw Birhanu
    HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care.2021; Volume 13: 251.     CrossRef
  • Predictors of Mortality Among Adult HIV-Infected Patients Taking Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in Harari Hospitals, Ethiopia
    Abdi Birhanu, Tariku Dingeta, Moti Tolera
    HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care.2021; Volume 13: 727.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiology of survival pattern and its predictors among HIV positive patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy in Southern Ethiopia public health facilities: a retrospective cohort study
    Abewa Kebede, Fasil Tessema, Gadisa Bekele, Zerihun Kura, Hailu Merga
    AIDS Research and Therapy.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prognostic Factors of Mortality among Adult Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy in India: A Hospital Based Retrospective Cohort Study
    Nitin Joseph, Ushasti Sinha, Nishtha Tiwari, Pritha Ghosh, Patneedi Sindhu
    BioMed Research International.2019; 2019: 1.     CrossRef
  • Predictors of mortality among adult patients enrolled on Antiretroviral Therapy in Hiwotfana specialized University Hospital, Eastern Ethiopia: Retrospective Cohort study
    Eticha Endalkachew Mekonnen
    Journal of HIV for Clinical and Scientific Research.2018; : 007.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and Risk Factors of Mortality among Adult HIV Patients Initiating ART in Rural Setting of HIV Care and Treatment Services in North Western Tanzania: A Retrospective Cohort Study
    Daniel Wilfred Gunda, Igembe Nkandala, Semvua Bukheti Kilonzo, Boniface Bartholomew Kilangi, Bonaventura Cornel Mpondo
    Journal of Sexually Transmitted Diseases.2017; 2017: 1.     CrossRef
Levels of adherence and factors associated with adherence to option B+ prevention of mother-to-child transmission among pregnant and lactating mothers in selected government health facilities of South Wollo Zone, Amhara Region, northeast Ethiopia, 2016
Delelegn Tsegaye, Leul Deribe, Shambel Wodajo
Epidemiol Health. 2016;38:e2016043.   Published online October 13, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2016043
  • 14,445 View
  • 395 Download
  • 19 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The aim of this study was to measure the levels of adherence and to identify factors associated with adherence to option B+ prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) among pregnant and lactating mothers in selected government health facilities of South Wollo Zone, Amhara Region, northeast Ethiopia.
METHODS
An institution-based cross-sectional quantitative study design was employed from March 1, 2016 to April 14, 2016, using a standard structured data collection instrument. A sample of 191 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive pregnant and lactating mothers who were receiving PMTCT follow-up in the selected health facilities participated in the study. The data were entered using EpiData 3.1 and analyzed using SPSS version 21. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were employed to identify factors associated with adherence. The p-values <0.05 and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to identify associations between independent predictors and the outcome variable.
RESULTS
The level of adherence to option B+ PMTCT drugs was 87.9%. Women who received in-hospital treatment, who lived in rural areas, and faced challenges in initiating lifelong option B+ treatment on the same-day that they were diagnosed with HIV were less likely to adhere to the treatment (adjusted odds ratios [95% CI] of 0.3 [0.11 to 0.82], 0.26 [0.1 to 0.73], and 0.08 [0.02 to 0.37], respectively).
CONCLUSIONS
Collaborative efforts of zonal health departments with health facility administrators and counselors are recommended for effective and efficient interventions focusing on hospitals, rural areas, and patients who face challenges on the day of their diagnosis.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Adherence to option B+ PMTCT program and its predictors among HIV‐positive women in Ethiopia. A systematic review and meta‐analysis
    Habtamu Geremew, Demeke Geremew, Samuel Abdisa, Anteneh Mengist Dessie, Getachew Mullu Kassa, Nurilign Abebe Moges
    Health Science Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Antiretroviral therapy adherence among breastfeeding mothers at a health facility in north Malawi
    Beatrice Kanyimbo, Ursula K Kafulafula, Bertha Chakhame
    African Journal of Midwifery and Women's Health.2022; 16(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Adherence to option B+ and its association with disclosure status and counseling among HIV-positive pregnant and lactating women in Ethiopia: systematic review and meta-analysis
    Chalachew Adugna Wubneh, Birye Dessalegn Mekonnen, Mekdess Wesenyeleh Delelegn, Kendalem Asmare Atalell
    Public Health.2022; 211: 105.     CrossRef
  • The role of men in antenatal care and preventing HIV transmission from mothers to infants in Gambella region, Ethiopia
    Mirgissa Kaba, Michelle R. Kaufman, Andrea Ruff, Anteneh Asefa Mekonnen
    PLOS Global Public Health.2022; 2(8): e0000879.     CrossRef
  • What influences uptake and early adherence to Option B+ (lifelong antiretroviral therapy among HIV positive pregnant and breastfeeding women) in Central Uganda? A mixed methods study
    Aggrey David Mukose, Hilde Bastiaens, Fredrick Makumbi, Esther Buregyeya, Rose Naigino, Joshua Musinguzi, Jean-Pierre Van Geertruyden, Rhoda K. Wanyenze, Julie AE Nelson
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(5): e0251181.     CrossRef
  • Level of adherence to option B plus PMTCT and associated factors among HIV positive pregnant and lactating women in public health facilities of Hawassa city, Southern Ethiopia
    Samuel Abdisa, Zelalem Tenaw, Frank T. Spradley
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(8): e0255808.     CrossRef
  • Withdrawn: Magnitude of Adherence to Option B plus program and associated factors among women in Eastern African Countries: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
    Reta Tsegaye, Werku Etafa, Bizuneh Wakuma, Getu Mosisa, Diriba Mulisa, Tadesse Tolossa
    International Journal of Africa Nursing Sciences.2021; : 100368.     CrossRef
  • Adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV infected pregnant women in public health sectors: a pilot of Chilenje level one Hospital Lusaka, Zambia
    Moses Mukosha, Grace Chiyesu, Bellington Vwalika
    Pan African Medical Journal.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Joint and Separate Analysis for Longitudinal and Survival Data on Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV Among Infected Mothers on Option B+ at Health Centers in North Shewa Zone, Ethiopia, 2017


    Abinet Dagnaw Mekuria, Assefa Legesse Sisay, Kassa Ketsela Hailegiorgies, Ayele Mamo Abebe
    Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare.2020; Volume 13: 1179.     CrossRef
  • Alarm Clock-Based Reminder for Improving Low Adherence on Option B Plus Antiretroviral Therapy Among HIV Positive Pregnant and Lactating Mothers in Northern Ethiopia


    Gebremedhin Gebreegziabher Gebretsadik, Hailay Gebretnsae, Mulu Ftwi, Afewerki Tesfahunegn Nigusse
    HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care.2020; Volume 12: 687.     CrossRef
  • Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment for Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV in Eastern Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study


    Anwar Fedlu, Birhanu Alie, Ammas Siraj Mohammed, Fuad Adem, Abduselam Hassen
    HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care.2020; Volume 12: 725.     CrossRef
  • Adherence to Option B+ Care for the Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission Among Pregnant Women in Ethiopia


    Fikadu Wondimu, Fisseha Yetwale, Endashew Admassu, Wakgari Binu, Gizachew Abdissa Bulto, Getie Lake, Eden Girmaye, Kababa Temesgen, Taklu Marama
    HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care.2020; Volume 12: 769.     CrossRef
  • Level of Good Adherence on Option B+ PMTCT and Associated Factors Among HIV Positive Pregnant and Lactating Mothers in Public Health Facilities of Ilu Abba Bor and Buno Bedele Zones, Oromia Regional State, Southwestern Ethiopia, 2018


    Eyosiyas Yeshialem Asefa, Dejene Edosa Dirirsa
    HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care.2020; Volume 12: 789.     CrossRef
  • The magnitude of adherence to option B plus program and associated factors among women in eastern African countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Reta Tsegaye, Werku Etafa, Bizuneh Wakuma, Getu Mosisa, Diriba Mulisa, Tadesse Tolossa
    BMC Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Low adherence to Option B+ antiretroviral therapy among pregnant women and lactating mothers in eastern Tanzania
    Kamonga M. Zacharius, Namanya Basinda, Karol Marwa, Emmanuel H. Mtui, Albino Kalolo, Anthony Kapesa, Massimo Ciccozzi
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(2): e0212587.     CrossRef
  • Levels of Option B+ ART Drugs Adherence and Associated Factors among Pregnant Women Following ART Services at Public Health Facilities of East Shawa Zone, Oromia, Ethiopia
    Mihretu Tarekegn, Ararso Baru, Assefa Seme
    Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare.2019; : 100459.     CrossRef
  • “I Was Not Told That I Still Have The Virus”: Perceptions of Utilization of Option B+ Services at a Health Center in Malawi
    Patience Mulewa, Egrina Satumba, Christopher Mubisi, Joseph Kandiado, Tumaini Malenga, Alinane Linda Nyondo-Mipando
    Journal of the International Association of Providers of AIDS Care (JIAPAC).2019; 18: 232595821987087.     CrossRef
  • Option B plus antiretroviral therapy adherence and associated factors among HIV positive pregnant women in Southern Ethiopia
    Dawit Jember Tesfaye, Desalegn Tsegaw Hibistu, Teshome Abuka Abebo, Feleke Tafesse Asfaw, Kaleegziabher Lukas, Tariku Laelago, Ermias Abera Turuse, Henok Gebreyohaness Kebede, Abraham Abate Altaye, Fanuel Belayneh Bekele
    BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Acceptability of option B+ among HIV positive women receiving antenatal and postnatal care services in selected health centre’s in Lusaka
    Bridget Chomba Chanda, Rosemary Ndonyo Likwa, Jessy Zgambo, Louis Tembo, Choolwe Jacobs
    BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
Seroprevalence and associated risk factors of hepatitis B virus among pregnant women in southern Ethiopia: a hospital-based cross-sectional study
Yeshi Metaferia, Walelign Dessie, Ibrahim Ali, Anteneh Amsalu
Epidemiol Health. 2016;38:e2016027.   Published online June 19, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2016027
  • 17,310 View
  • 533 Download
  • 33 Web of Science
  • 33 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major blood-borne and sexually transmitted infectious agent that is a significant global public health issue. The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence and risk factors of HBV among pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic of the Hawassa University referral hospital in Ethiopia.
METHODS
A cross-sectional study was conducted from April to May, 2015. A total of 269 consecutive pregnant women attending antenatal consultations were enrolled. Sociodemographic information and data regarding possible risk factors were collected using a structured questionnaire. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) screening was performed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the data were analyzed.
RESULTS
The overall seroprevalence of HBsAg among the 269 participants enrolled in the study was 7.8% (n=21). The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was 5.2% (n=14), of whom two participants (14.2%) were also positive for HBsAg. Study participants with no formal education (odds ratio [OR], 3.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27 to 10.68; p<0.05) were more likely to be infected with HBV than those who had completed at least secondary school. Although HBsAg was detected more often in pregnant women who had multiple exposure factors (8.8%, n=13) than in pregnant women who had not experienced possible risk factors (4%, n=1), this difference was not statistically significant (OR, 2.33; 95%CI, 0.29 to 18.63).
CONCLUSIONS
A high prevalence of HBV infection was detected in the study population. Neither the type of risk factors nor exposure to multiple risk factors was significantly associated with HBV infection. Hence, screening pregnant women regardless of risk factors and improving awareness of the transmission routes of HBV within this group may reduce the risk of HBV infections.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • High seroprevalence and associated risk factors for hepatitis B virus infection among pregnant women living with HIV in Mtwara region, Tanzania
    Vulstan James Shedura, Geofrey Joseph Mchau, Doreen Kamori
    Bulletin of the National Research Centre.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of hepatitis B infection and its associated factors among pregnant mothers attending antenatal care at public hospitals at Hararghe, Eastern Ethiopia
    Abbas Umer, Zelalem Teklemariam, Firayad Ayele, Melkamu Merid Mengesha
    Frontiers in Global Women's Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Systematic review and meta-analysis of seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency virus serological markers among pregnant women in Africa, 1984-2020
    Jean Thierry Ebogo-Belobo, Sebastien Kenmoe, Chris Andre Mbongue Mikangue, Serges Tchatchouang, Lontuo-Fogang Robertine, Guy Roussel Takuissu, Juliette Laure Ndzie Ondigui, Arnol Bowo-Ngandji, Raoul Kenfack-Momo, Cyprien Kengne-Ndé, Donatien Serge Mbaga,
    World Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2023; 12(5): 264.     CrossRef
  • Magnitudes and Correlates of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B Virus, and Syphilis among Pregnant Mothers Attending Antenatal Care in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
    Kassa Genetu, Kerebih Abere, Erdaw Tachbele, Atif Amin Baig
    Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • Clinical utility of the 'Determine HBsAg' Point-of-Care Test for Diagnosis of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen in Africa
    Amie Ceesay, Maud Lemoine, Damien Cohen, Isabelle Chemin, Gibril Ndow
    Expert Review of Molecular Diagnostics.2022; 22(5): 497.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of hepatitis B virus and its associated factors among pregnant women attending antenatal care in Ambo town, Central Ethiopia: A cross-sectional study
    Merga Wakjira, Jiregna Darega, Habtamu Oljira, Meseret Robi Tura
    Clinical Epidemiology and Global Health.2022; 15: 101054.     CrossRef
  • Sero-Prevalence, Infectivity, and Associated Risk Factors of Hepatitis B Virus Among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Care in Sankura Primary Hospital, Silte Zone, Southern Ethiopia, 2021
    Bedru Argaw, Shemsu Kedir, Abdulmejid Mustefa, Mubarek Yesse, Leila Hussen, Behradin Abdella, Mohammed Muze, Musa Jemal
    The Open Microbiology Journal.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Seroprevalence of Hepatitis B Virus and Associated Factors Among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Care in Public Health Facilities in Jigjiga Town, Eastern Ethiopia
    Abdurahman Kedir Roble, Kedir Teji Roba, Bezatu Mengistie, Mohammed Abdurke Kure
    International Journal of Women's Health.2021; Volume 12: 1299.     CrossRef
  • Sero-Prevalence of Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Associated Factors Among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Care Services in Gedeo Zone, Southern Ethiopia
    Mhiret Belay Tadiwos, Girum Gebremeskel Kanno, Abriham Shiferaw Areba, Robel Hussen Kabthymer, Zeleke Girma Abate, Mekonnen Birhanie Aregu
    Journal of Primary Care & Community Health.2021; 12: 215013272199362.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and factors associated with hepatitis B virus infection among household members: a cross-sectional study in Beijing
    Xuan Zhao, Xuefeng Shi, Min Lv, Beibei Yuan, Jiang Wu
    Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics.2021; 17(6): 1818.     CrossRef
  • Hepatitis B virus infection and its determinants among HIV positive pregnant women: Multicenter unmatched case-control study
    Zelalem Alamrew Anteneh, Estifanose Wondaye, Endalkachew Worku Mengesha, Claudia Marotta
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(4): e0251084.     CrossRef
  • Hepatitis B surface antigen and associated factors among mothers who had antenatal care contact in Attat Hospital, southern Ethiopia
    Yohannes Fikadu Geda, Hailu Desse, Molalegn Mesele Gesesse, Tamirat Melis Berhe
    SAGE Open Medicine.2021; 9: 205031212110244.     CrossRef
  • Sero-Prevalence and Associated Factors of Hepatitis B Virus Among Pregnant Women at North West Ethiopia: An Institution-Based Cross-Sectional Study
    Gebreselassie Demeke, Getachew Mengistu Ayalneh, Abtie Abebaw Shiferaw, Milkiyas Toru, Tebelay Dilnessa
    International Journal of General Medicine.2021; Volume 14: 2799.     CrossRef
  • Seroprevalence and associated risk factors for Hepatitis B Virus infections among apparently healthy pregnant mothers attending Anc in Rubkona primary health care center in Rubkona County, Unity State, South Sudan
    Machar Michael Pou, Jara Dube
    Archives of Hepatitis Research.2021; : 004.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of HIV and hepatitis B virus among pregnant women in Luanda (Angola): geospatial distribution and its association with socio-demographic and clinical-obstetric determinants
    Amélia Nkutxi Vueba, Ricardo Almendra, Paula Santana, Clarissa Faria, Maria do Céu Sousa
    Virology Journal.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Seroprevalence of Hepatitis B Virus and Associated Factors among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Care Services at Public Health Facilities in Nekemte Town
    Sinkinesh Eba, Gemechu Kejela, Afework Tamiru, Robert Gaspar
    International Journal of Reproductive Medicine.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Seropositivity rate and sociodemographic factors associated to HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis among parturients from Irene Neto Maternity of Lubango city, Angola
    Dinamene Oliveira, Maria do Rosário Martins, Rita Castro, Lemuel Cordeiro, Maria Rosalina Barroso, Maria Antónia Nazaré, Filomena Pereira
    Sexually Transmitted Infections.2020; 96(8): 587.     CrossRef
  • Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Its Determinants among Pregnant Women in Ethiopia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Addisu Alehegn Alemu, Liknaw Bewket Zeleke, Bewket Yesarah Aynalem, Getachew Mullu Kassa
    Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiology of hepatitis B and C virus infections among patients who booked for surgical procedures at Felegehiwot referral hospital, Northwest Ethiopia
    Mulusew Andualem Asemahagn, Isabelle Chemin
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(6): e0234822.     CrossRef
  • Seroprevalence of Hepatitis B Virus Infection, Mother-To-Child Transmission, and Associated Risk Factors Among Delivering Mothers in Tigray Region, Northern Ethiopia: a Cross-Sectional Study
    Kbrom Gemechu Kiros, Mekonnen Haftom Goyteom, Yohannes Ashebir Tesfamichael, Haftea Hagos Mekonen, Tsegu Hailu Gebru, Tesfay Gebreslassie Gebrehiwot, Yared Hailesilassie Teka, Woldu Aberhe Abrha, Degena Bahrey Tadesse
    Infectious Diseases and Therapy.2020; 9(4): 901.     CrossRef
  • Sero-prevalence and determinants of Hepatitis B among a cohort of HIV-infected women of reproductive age in Nigeria
    Olusegun Adewale Adeyemi, Ijeoma Uchenna Itanyi, Chamberline Ekene Ozigbu, Nicole Stadnick, Kiyomi Tsuyuki, Olanrewaju Olayiwola, Amaka Grace Ogidi, Chuka Eze, Gregory Alan Aarons, Chima Ariel Onoka, Echezona Edozie Ezeanolue, Jason Blackard
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(9): e0236456.     CrossRef
  • Hepatitis B and C Viruses’ Infection and Associated Factors among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Care in Hospitals in the Amhara National Regional State, Ethiopia
    Mulat Dagnew, Yihenew Million, Mucheye Gizachew, Setegn Eshetie, Gashaw Yitayew, Lakachew Asrade, Mulat Adefris, Feleke Moges, Moges Tiruneh
    International Journal of Microbiology.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
  • Sero-prevalence and risk factors for hepatitis B virus infection among the consumers of the alcoholic beverage, cheka in Konso zone, southwestern Ethiopia
    Behailu Tsegaye, Eyayou Girma, Tesfaye Kanko, Tamiru Shibru, Tadiwos Hailu, Sntayehu Abebe, Eshetu Zerihun, Aseer Manilal, Eskezyiaw Agedew
    Heliyon.2020; 6(12): e05664.     CrossRef
  • Sero-prevalence of hepatitis B virus and associated factors among pregnant women in Gambella hospital, South Western Ethiopia: facility based cross-sectional study
    Abayneh Tunje Tanga, Misanew Andargie Teshome, Desta Hiko, Chaltu Fikru, Gemechu Kejela Jilo
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Magnitude of hepatitis B and C virus infections and associated factors among patients scheduled for surgery at Hawassa University comprehensive specialized Hospital, Hawassa City, southern Ethiopia
    Meseret Taye, Deresse Daka, Anteneh Amsalu, Siraj Hussen
    BMC Research Notes.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A case of hepatitis B virus infection in Eritrean Diciotti migrant: phylogenetic analysis and ‘mirror effect’
    Giancarlo Ceccarelli, Eleonora Cella, Serena Vita, Alessia Lai, Erika Ebranati, Gianguglielmo Zehender, Marta Fogolari, Francesca Antonelli, Michele Pier Luca Guarino, Elisabetta Riva, Silvia Angeletti, Massimo Ciccozzi
    Future Virology.2019; 14(8): 509.     CrossRef
  • An updated systematic review and meta-analysis of the prevalence of hepatitis B virus in Ethiopia
    Teshiwal Deress Yazie, Mekonnen Girma Tebeje
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Elimination of Vertical Transmission of Hepatitis B in Africa: A Review of Available Tools and New Opportunities
    Jodie Dionne-Odom, Basile Njei, Alan T.N. Tita
    Clinical Therapeutics.2018; 40(8): 1255.     CrossRef
  • Hepatitis B virus infection among pregnant women in Ethiopia: a systematic review and Meta-analysis of prevalence studies
    Kindie Mitiku Kebede, Dejene Derseh Abateneh, Alemayehu Sayih Belay
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence, Infectivity, and Associated Risk Factors of Hepatitis B Virus among Pregnant Women in Yirgalem Hospital, Ethiopia: Implication of Screening to Control Mother-to-Child Transmission
    Anteneh Amsalu, Getachew Ferede, Setegn Eshetie, Agete Tadewos, Demissie Assegu
    Journal of Pregnancy.2018; 2018: 1.     CrossRef
  • Seroprevalence of Markers of Hepatitis B Virus Infection, Associated Factors, and Vaccination Status in Young Adults in Arkhangelsk, Northwest Russia: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study
    Tatiana Balaeva, Andrej Grjibovski, Olga Samodova, Anatoly Sannikov, Elise Klouman
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2018; 15(9): 1905.     CrossRef
  • Seroepidemiology of Hepatitis B and C Virus Infections among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Clinic in Selected Health Facilities in East Wollega Zone, West Oromia, Ethiopia
    Regea Dabsu, Eyasu Ejeta
    BioMed Research International.2018; 2018: 1.     CrossRef
  • Seroprevalence of HIV among pregnant women in Ethiopia: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Demeke Geremew, Fitsumbrhan Tajebe, Sintayehu Ambachew, Aklilu Endalamaw, Setegn Eshetie
    BMC Research Notes.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health