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Volume 32; 2010
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Editorial
What Should be Taken into Consideration for a Meta-Analysis of Green Tea Consumption and Stomach Cancer Risk?
Jeongseon Kim
Epidemiol Health. 2010;32:e2010012.   Published online December 31, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2010012
  • 11,137 View
  • 77 Download
  • 1 Citations
PDF
Abstract
Summary
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Key Message

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  • Prospective cohort study of tea consumption and risk of digestive system cancers: results from the Shanghai Women's Health Study
    Sarah Nechuta, Xiao-Ou Shu, Hong-Lan Li, Gong Yang, Bu-Tian Ji, Yong-Bing Xiang, Hui Cai, Wong-Ho Chow, Yu-Tang Gao, Wei Zheng
    The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.2012; 96(5): 1056.     CrossRef
Original Articles
No Association Between Functional Polymorphisms in COMT and MTHFR and Schizophrenia Risk in Korean Population
Ho Jin Kang, Byeong Moo Choe, Seong Hwan Kim, Seung-Rak Son, Kyoung-Mu Lee, Byoung Gwon Kim, Young-Seoub Hong
Epidemiol Health. 2010;32:e2010011.   Published online December 24, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2010011
  • 13,876 View
  • 126 Download
  • 12 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES

Common genetic SNPs in two genes, encoding catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), which are interconnected with COMT gene regulation, have been reported to contribute to schizophrenia risk. In this study, we evaluated the association between functional polymorphisms in COMT and MTHFR and schizophrenia risk with a case-control study in a Korean population.

METHODS

We performed a case-control study by genotyping analysis using 360 cases and 348 controls in Korean subjects to determine the association between functional polymorphisms in COMT and MTHFR and schizophrenia risk.

RESULTS

Four functional SNPs in COMT (Val158Met and rs165599) and MTHFR (C677T and A1298C) were genotyped by primer extension assay. None of the genotype distributions for the four SNPs was significantly different between cases and controls. Stratified analysis did not show any significant gender difference for any polymorphism. In addition, we found no evidence of a gene-gene interaction in the analysis of combined genotypes.

CONCLUSION

Our results suggest no significant association between the selected functional polymorphisms of COMT or MTHFR in Korean schizophrenia subjects. However, further studies are required to confirm our findings in a larger number of subjects.

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  • Association between MTHFR (677C>T and 1298A>C) polymorphisms and psychiatric disorder: A meta-analysis
    Xinyao Meng, Ji-long Zheng, Mao-ling Sun, Hai-yun Lai, Bao-jie Wang, Jun Yao, Hongbo Wang, Zezhi Li
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(7): e0271170.     CrossRef
  • Association between variants of MTHFR genes and psychiatric disorders: A meta-analysis
    Yu-Xin Zhang, Lu-Ping Yang, Cong Gai, Cui-Cui Cheng, Zhen-yu Guo, Hong-Mei Sun, Die Hu
    Frontiers in Psychiatry.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • MTHFR Ala222Val polymorphism and clinical characteristics confer susceptibility to suicide attempt in chronic patients with schizophrenia
    Jia Hong Liu, Cheng Zhu, Ke Zheng, Wei Tang, Li Li Gao, Tammy H. Trihn, Hanjing Emily Wu, Da Chun Chen, Mei Hong Xiu, Xiang Yang Zhang
    Scientific Reports.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effort-related decision making in humanized COMT mice: Effects of Val158Met polymorphisms and possible implications for negative symptoms in humans
    Jen-Hau Yang, Rose E. Presby, Suzanne Cayer, Renee A. Rotolo, Peter A. Perrino, R. Holly Fitch, Merce Correa, Elissa J. Chesler, John D. Salamone
    Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior.2020; 196: 172975.     CrossRef
  • Association of functional polymorphisms in 3′-untranslated regions of COMT, DISC1, and DTNBP1 with schizophrenia
    Zahra I. Mohamed, Shiau F. Tee, Pek Y. Tang
    Psychiatric Genetics.2018; 28(6): 110.     CrossRef
  • Role of MTHFR C677T gene polymorphism in the susceptibility of schizophrenia: An updated meta-analysis
    Upendra Yadav, Pradeep Kumar, Sanjay Gupta, Vandana Rai
    Asian Journal of Psychiatry.2016; 20: 41.     CrossRef
  • The Role of a Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met Genetic Polymorphism in Schizophrenia: A Systematic Review and Updated Meta-analysis on 32,816 Subjects
    Thelma Beatriz González-Castro, Yazmin Hernández-Díaz, Isela Esther Juárez-Rojop, María Lilia López-Narváez, Carlos Alfonso Tovilla-Zárate, Ana Fresan
    NeuroMolecular Medicine.2016; 18(2): 216.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of an association between plasma total homocysteine and schizophrenia by a Mendelian randomization analysis
    Shusuke Numata, Makoto Kinoshita, Atsushi Tajima, Akira Nishi, Issei Imoto, Tetsuro Ohmori
    BMC Medical Genetics.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Catechol-O-methyltransferase gene polymorphisms in Saudi cases with schizophrenia
    Ashraf Tantawy, Abduhamid Al-Yahia, Yasser Raya, Abdurrahman Al-Mohaimeed, Ahmad Settin
    Egyptian Journal of Psychiatry.2015; 36(3): 118.     CrossRef
  • Association of MTHFR C677T polymorphism with schizophrenia and its effect on episodic memory and gray matter density in patients
    Yanling Zhang, Hao Yan, Lin Tian, Fang Wang, Tianlan Lu, Lifang Wang, Jun Yan, Qi Liu, Lan Kang, Yanyan Ruan, Dai Zhang, Weihua Yue
    Behavioural Brain Research.2013; 243: 146.     CrossRef
  • Genetic Variation Throughout the Folate Metabolic Pathway Influences Negative Symptom Severity in Schizophrenia
    J. L. Roffman, D. G. Brohawn, A. Z. Nitenson, E. A. Macklin, J. W. Smoller, D. C. Goff
    Schizophrenia Bulletin.2013; 39(2): 330.     CrossRef
  • No Association of Functional Polymorphisms in Methlylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase and the Risk and Minor Physical Anomalies of Schizophrenia in Korean Population
    Su-Gyeong Kim, Joo Yun Song, Eun-Jeong Joo, Seong Hoon Jeong, Se Hyun Kim, Kyu Young Lee, Nam Young Lee, Yong Min Ahn, Yong Sik Kim, Myoung-Sun Roh
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2011; 26(10): 1356.     CrossRef
Association of Subway Driver's Depressive Symptoms and Experience of Work-Related Problems
Sun-Jin Jo, Hyeon Woo Yim, Hyoung-Ryoul Kim, Kang Sook Lee, Jong-Ik Park, Sung Man Chang
Epidemiol Health. 2010;32:e2010010.   Published online December 3, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2010010
  • 11,839 View
  • 88 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES

Subway drivers experience various types of work-related problems during their driving, and those experiences can act as risk factors for depressive symptoms. This study was conducted to investigate the association between work-related problems and subway driver's depressive symptoms.

METHODS

We recruited all of the 961 current subway drivers of a subway company located in Seoul, South Korea and conducted a survey of their socio-demographic and vocational characteristics, hospital visits as an outpatient or inpatient, and work-related problem experiences during the last year. Work-related problems included an accident resulting in death or injury, a conflict with a customer, a sudden stop from an emergency bell, or a near accident. Depressive symptoms were measured with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) instrument. The survey was performed using a self-report questionnaire from April 16 to July 13, 2007. The data of 827 drivers (86.2%) were analyzed.

RESULTS

Experience of a conflict with a passenger (p=0.011), a sudden stop from an emergency bell (p=0.001), or a near accident (p=0.001) increased the prevalence of depressive symptoms among subway drivers. A multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that a sudden stop from an emergency bell increased the risk of depressive symptoms significantly (OR=2.59, p=0.026). Near accidents were marginally associated with a higher risk for depressive symptoms (OR=1.62, p=0.062).

CONCLUSION

The experience of a sudden stop from an emergency bell increased subway driver's depressive symptoms, and near accidents may increase the risk of depressive symptoms. Therefore, interventions for the drivers who had experienced these work-related problems are needed.

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  • Research on the Evaluation Method of the Railroad Drivers’ Safety Psychology
    创 高
    Advances in Psychology.2022; 12(02): 352.     CrossRef
  • Relationships of social support, coping styles, perceived stress, and quality of life: The difference between metro drivers and station attendants in Xi’an, China
    Bo Liu, Xiaoyang Xin, Quan Xu, Yue Han, Ying Li, Xuqun You
    Current Psychology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Posttraumatic stress reactions of underground drivers after suicides by jumping to arriving trains; feasibility of an early stepped care outpatient intervention
    Giancarlo Giupponi, Heike Thoma, Dorian Lamis, Alberto Forte, Maurizio Pompili, Hans-Peter Kapfhammer
    Journal of Trauma & Dissociation.2019; 20(5): 495.     CrossRef
  • Factors associated with suicide ideation among subway drivers in Korea
    Junsu Byun, Hyoung-Ryoul Kim, Hye-Eun Lee, Se-Eun Kim, Jongin Lee
    Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Sickness absence of LU train drivers after track incidents
    S. Chavda
    Occupational Medicine.2016; 66(7): 571.     CrossRef
  • Systematic Review of the Impact of Suicides and Other Critical Incidents on Railway Personnel
    Cécile Bardon, Brian L. Mishara
    Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior.2015; 45(6): 720.     CrossRef
  • The association between psychiatric disorders and work-related problems among subway drivers in Korea
    Se-eun Kim, Hyoung-Ryoul Kim, Jong-Ik Park, Hae Woo Lee, Jongin Lee, Junsu Byun, Hyeon Woo Yim
    Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comments on Jo and Colleagues' Paper (2010) "Association of Subway Driver's Depressive Symptoms and Experience of Work-Related Problems"
    Jae-Min Kim
    Epidemiology and Health.2011; 33: e2011002.     CrossRef
The Associations between Social Support, Health-Related Behaviors, Socioeconomic Status and Depression in Medical Students
Yoolwon Jeong, Jin Young Kim, Jae Seon Ryu, Ko eun Lee, Eun Hee Ha, Hyesook Park
Epidemiol Health. 2010;32:e2010009.   Published online November 24, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2010009
  • 14,709 View
  • 137 Download
  • 26 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES

The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of depression in medical students and to evaluate whether interpersonal social support, health-related behaviors, and socio-economic factors were associated with depression in medical students.

METHODS

The subjects in this study were 120 medical students in Seoul, Korea who were surveyed in September, 2008. The subjects were all women and over the age of 20. Their age, body mass index (BMI), quality of sleep, diet, household income, smoking, alcohol consumption, exercise levels, and self-reported health status were surveyed. The degree of perceived social support was measured using the interpersonal support evaluation list (ISEL). Depression was evaluated using the center for epidemiology studies depression scale (CES-D).

RESULTS

The mean CES-D score was 14.1±8.6 and 37.1% of the participants appeared to suffer from depression. Low levels of perceived interpersonal support increased the risk of depression by more than 10 times and having higher household income did not necessarily decrease the risk of depression.

CONCLUSION

Medical students have a relatively high level of depression. Efforts should be made to encourage social support in order to promote mental health in medical students.

Summary
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Key Message

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Prevalence of Depression Among Undergraduate Medical Students in India: A Systemic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Gitashree Dutta, Navin Rajendran, Tarun Kumar, Shoban B Varthya, Vinoth Rajendran
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Negative Life Events, Social Ties, and Depressive Symptoms for Older Adults in China
    Hangqing Ruan, Ke Shen, Feinian Chen
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Background factors associated with academic motivation for attending medical school immediately after admission in Japan: A single‐center study
    Takashi Watari, Nobuhiro Nagai, Kaori Kono, Kazumichi Onigata
    Journal of General and Family Medicine.2022; 23(3): 164.     CrossRef
  • Correlation between Positive Orientation and Control of Anger, Anxiety and Depression in Nursing Students in Poland, Spain and Slovakia during the COVID-19 Pandemic
    Ewa Kupcewicz, Marzena Mikla, Helena Kadučáková, Elżbieta Grochans, Maria Dolores Roldán Valcarcel, Anna Maria Cybulska
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(4): 2482.     CrossRef
  • Ego-resiliency moderates the risk of depression and social anxiety symptoms on suicidal ideation in medical students
    Eun Hyun Seo, Hae-Jung Yang, Seung-Gon Kim, Hyung-Jun Yoon
    Annals of General Psychiatry.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Depression in medical students: prevalence, dynamics and comorbidity
    V.V. Ruzhenkova, I.S. Khamskaya, Yu.N. Gomelak
    Zhurnal nevrologii i psikhiatrii im. S.S. Korsakova.2022; 122(6): 7.     CrossRef
  • The moderating effect of social resources on the link between study-related stressors and depressive symptoms among medical students in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany – a cross-sectional study
    Nora Kappner, Jessica Lang, Anne Berthold, Petra Maria Gaum
    BMC Psychiatry.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and Correlates of Likely Major Depressive Disorder among Medical Students in Alberta, Canada
    Sumeet Dhanoa, Folajinmi Oluwasina, Reham Shalaby, Esther Kim, Belinda Agyapong, Marianne Hrabok, Ejemai Eboreime, Maryana Kravtsenyuk, Alicia Yang, Izu Nwachukwu, Chantal Moreau, Adam Abba-Aji, Daniel Li, Vincent I. O. Agyapong
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(18): 11496.     CrossRef
  • Medical students’ crisis-induced stress and the association with social support
    Vera M. A. Broks, Karen M. Stegers-Jager, Jeroen van der Waal, Walter W. van den Broek, Andrea M. Woltman, Muhammad A. Z. Mughal
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(12): e0278577.     CrossRef
  • Social Support, Health Literacy and Depressive Symptoms among Medical Students: An Analysis of Mediating Effects
    Yaqin Zhong, Elizabeth Schroeder, Yuexia Gao, Xiaojun Guo, Yuanyuan Gu
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(2): 633.     CrossRef
  • Resilience and sense of coherence in first year medical students - a cross-sectional study
    Lena Luibl, Julia Traversari, Friedrich Paulsen, Michael Scholz, Pascal Burger
    BMC Medical Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of depression, anxiety, and stress among medical students of one private medical college
    ShaikRiyaz Ameer
    MRIMS Journal of Health Sciences.2021; 9(1): 16.     CrossRef
  • Association Between Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Depressive Symptoms in Chinese Resident Physicians
    Qing Chang, Yang Xia, Song Bai, Xi Zhang, Yashu Liu, Da Yao, Xinrui Xu, Yuhong Zhao
    Frontiers in Psychiatry.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Ahmed Waqas, Aqsa Iftikhar, Zahra Malik, Kapil Kiran Aedma, Hafsa Meraj, Sadiq Naveed
    Global Psychiatry.2019; 2(2): 211.     CrossRef
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    Thao Thi Thu Nguyen, Ngoc Thi Minh Nguyen, Manh Van Pham, Han Van Pham, Hiroyuki Nakamura, Cesario Bianchi
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    Mohammad G. Sehlo, Faten N. Al-Zaben, Doaa A. Khalifa, Abdullah K. Agabawi, Mishal S. Akel, Ismail A. Nemri, Lujain K. Abd Al-Wassie
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    Maja Racic, Radica Todorovic, Nedeljka Ivkovic, Srdjan Masic, Bojan Joksimovic, Milan Kulic
    Slovenian Journal of Public Health.2017; 56(4): 251.     CrossRef
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    Meng Shi, Li Liu, Zi Yue Wang, Lie Wang
    BMC Psychiatry.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Hong-Kyeung Chang, So-Jin Lee, Chul-Soo Park, Bong-Jo Kim, Cheol-Soon Lee, Boseok Cha, Dongyun Lee, Ji-Yeong Seo
    Sleep Medicine and Psychophysiology.2015; 22(2): 64.     CrossRef
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    AnjaliN Shete, KD Garkal
    CHRISMED Journal of Health and Research.2015; 2(2): 119.     CrossRef
  • Depressive symptoms in medical students: prevalence and related factors
    Bomi Kim, Hyerin Roh
    Korean Journal of Medical Education.2014; 26(1): 53.     CrossRef
  • Depressive symptoms in outpatients with heart failure: Importance of inflammatory biomarkers, disease severity and personality
    Corline Brouwers, Nina Kupper, Aline J. Pelle, Balász M. Szabó, Bert L.W.J.J.M. Westerhuis, Johan Denollet
    Psychology & Health.2014; 29(5): 564.     CrossRef
  • STUDY OF DEPRESSION AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS OF DIFFERENT PATHIES IN NANDED CITY, MAHARASHTRA.
    Sahu P. C, Inamdar I. F, Mohammed Ubaidulla, Saleem Tambe, Gadekar R.D, Sonkar V. K., Doibale M. K.
    Journal of Evolution of Medical and Dental sciences.2013; 2(22): 3978.     CrossRef
  • Quality of Life of Medical Students during Clinical Clerkship
    Nho-Eun Kim, Sung-Min Cho
    Korean Journal of Medical Education.2012; 24(4): 353.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Depression and Suicidal Thoughts amongst University Students in Poznan, Poland, Preliminary Report
    Ewa Mojs, Katarzyna Warchol-Biederman, Wlodzimierz Samborski
    Psychology.2012; 03(02): 132.     CrossRef
  • Correlations between Psychological Symptoms and Social Relationships among Medical Undergraduates in Anhui Province of China
    Liang Sun, Li-Na Sun, Ye-Huan Sun, Lin-Sheng Yang, Hong-Yan Wu, Dong-Dong Zhang, Hong-Yuan Cao, Ying Sun
    The International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine.2011; 42(1): 29.     CrossRef
Condom Use and Prevalence of Genital Chlamydia trachomatis Among the Korean Female Sex Workers
Joongyub Lee, Sun-Young Jung, Dong Seok Kwon, Minsoo Jung, Byung-Joo Park
Epidemiol Health. 2010;32:e2010008.   Published online August 13, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2010008
  • 18,844 View
  • 107 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES

Since 2004, availability of resources for preventing sexually transmitted diseases in Korean female sex workers (FSWs) has decreased because of strict application of a law against prostitution. This study is to evaluate the condom use and prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis among FSWs in Korea.

METHODS

We performed a cross-sectional study of FSWs from 15 major sex work sites in Korea from June to November 2008, using convenience sampling. Self-administered questionnaires and urine samples were collected after all participants' written informed consent. Urine samples were analyzed with PCR at a single central laboratory.

RESULTS

Among 1,086 FSWs who consented to study participation, data from 999 FSWs were appropriate for analysis. C. trachomatis prevalence was 12.8% (95% CI: 10.7-14.9%). Younger age increased risk for C. trachomatis. Whereas majority of FSWs (71.0%) answered high self confidence in condom negotiation, the proportion of FSWs who always used condoms last month was only 23.7%. However, practicing regular condom use showed significant protection against chlamydia infection, not self confidence in condom negotiation.

CONCLUSION

In Korea, FSWs were not practicing enough self-protection at work with a high prevalence of C. trachomatis. Education for constant practice of protection against sexually transmitted diseases is needed, especially for younger FSWs.

Summary
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Citations

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  • Sex Worker Health Outcomes in High-Income Countries of Varied Regulatory Environments: A Systematic Review
    Jessica McCann, Gemma Crawford, Jonathan Hallett
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(8): 3956.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and associated factors of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae among female commercial sex workers in Hawassa City, Southern Ethiopia
    Alelign Tadele, Siraj Hussen, Techalew Shimelis
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Risk factors of sexually transmitted infections among female sex workers in Republic of Korea
    Minsoo Jung
    Infectious Diseases of Poverty.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Preventing sexually transmitted and blood borne infections (STBBIs) among sex workers: a critical review of the evidence on determinants and interventions in high-income countries
    Elena Argento, Shira Goldenberg, Kate Shannon
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Jun-Qing Wu, Yu-Yan Li, Jing-Chao Ren, Na Li, Yin Zhou, Rui Zhao, Yu-Feng Zhang
    Asian Pacific Journal of Reproduction.2012; 1(1): 48.     CrossRef
Association between Alcohol Intake and Abdominal Obesity among the Korean Population
Mikyung Ryu, Heejin Kimm, Jaeseong Jo, Sun Ju Lee, Sun Ha Jee
Epidemiol Health. 2010;32:e2010007.   Published online May 19, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2010007
  • 13,529 View
  • 110 Download
  • 13 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES

Although abdominal obesity has been reported to be highly related with alcohol intake, the results are still inconclusive. Therefore, this study was conducted to explore the association between alcohol and abdominal obesity among the Korean population.

METHODS

This study included 8,603 participants (men: 5,195, women: 3,408) aged 30 to 87 who visited the health promotion centers in Seoul for routine health examinations from April, 2006 to June, 2007. Abdominal obesity was defined as WC ≥90 cm for men and ≥85 cm for women in accordance with the Korean Society for the Study of Obesity. For ever drinkers, total alcohol consumption in grams was classified into four groups (group 1, non-drinkers; group 2, 1-10 g of alcohol per day; group 3, 11-20 g of alcohol per day; and group 4, over 20 g of alcohol per day).

RESULTS

The mean age of the study population was 45.4 yr old (men) and 45.3 yr (women). The average waist circumference was 85.3 cm in men and 75.3 cm in women. A high alcohol intake was associated with high waist circumference in both genders. In multivariate analysis, the group of men and women drinkers consuming >20 g in a day had a large waist circumference compared with men and women non-drinkers.

CONCLUSION

This study showed that a high alcohol intake was related to high waist circumference. Such association remained independently even after adjustment for smoking, which is strongly related to abdominal obesity.

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Citations

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    Jin-Won Kwon, Hyun Joo Lee, Min Kyung Hyun, Ji Eun Choi, Jong Hee Kim, Na Rae Lee, Jin Seub Hwang, Eun Ju Lee
    World Neurosurgery.2013; 79(3-4): 499.     CrossRef
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    Mina Hamano, Yoshihiro Kamada, Shinichi Kiso, Kunimaro Furuta, Takashi Kizu, Norihiro Chatani, Mayumi Egawa, Takayo Takemura, Hisao Ezaki, Yuichi Yoshida, Kenji Watabe, Toshimitsu Hamasaki, Miyuki Umeda, Aiko Furubayashi, Kazuo Kinoshita, Osamu Kishida, T
    Hepatology Research.2013; 43(3): 238.     CrossRef
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    C. Dumesnil, L. Dauchet, J.B. Ruidavets, A. Bingham, D. Arveiler, J. Ferrières, P. Ducimetière, B. Haas, V. Bongard, A. Wagner, P. Amouyel, J. Dallongeville
    Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism.2013; 62(2): 91.     CrossRef
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    Eun Ju Lee, Hyun Joo Lee, Min Kyung Hyun, Ji Eun Choi, Jong Hee Kim, Na Rae Lee, Jin Seub Hwang, Jin-Won Kwon
    Journal of Neurosurgery.2012; 117(1): 53.     CrossRef
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    Rebecca Kanter, Benjamin Caballero
    Advances in Nutrition.2012; 3(4): 491.     CrossRef
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Case Report
In-Flight Transmission of Novel Influenza A (H1N1)
Joon Hyung Kim, Dong-Han Lee, Sang-Sook Shin, Chun Kang, Jin Seok Kim, Byung Yool Jun, Jong-Koo Lee
Epidemiol Health. 2010;32:e2010006.   Published online May 31, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2010006
  • 12,479 View
  • 99 Download
  • 13 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract

The Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed two patients, who had taken the same plane from Los Angeles to Seoul, with novel influenza A (H1N1). Through contact tracing, we concluded that the second patient was infected during the flight.

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    Eliyathamby A. Selvanathan, Maneka Jayasinghe, Saroja Selvanathan
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    Michel Bielecki, Dipti Patel, Jochen Hinkelbein, Matthieu Komorowski, John Kester, Shahul Ebrahim, Alfonso J. Rodriguez-Morales, Ziad A. Memish, Patricia Schlagenhauf
    Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease.2021; 39: 101915.     CrossRef
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    Jinjun Zhang, Fei Qin, Xinyan Qin, Jianren Li, Sijia Tian, Jing Lou, Xuqin Kang, Huixin Lian, Shengmei Niu, Wenzhong Zhang, Yuguo Chen
    Annals of Medicine.2021; 53(1): 1569.     CrossRef
  • Reprint of: Air travel and COVID-19 prevention in the pandemic and peri-pandemic period: A narrative review
    Michel Bielecki, Dipti Patel, Jochen Hinkelbein, Matthieu Komorowski, John Kester, Shahul Ebrahim, Alfonso J. Rodriguez-Morales, Ziad A. Memish, Patricia Schlagenhauf
    Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease.2020; 38: 101939.     CrossRef
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    Howard Weiss, Vicki Stover Hertzberg, Chris Dupont, Josh L. Espinoza, Shawn Levy, Karen Nelson, Sharon Norris
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    H. Lei, J. W. Tang, Y. Li
    Epidemiology and Infection.2018; 146(13): 1731.     CrossRef
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    M. Goeijenbier, P. van Genderen, B. J. Ward, A. Wilder-Smith, R. Steffen, A. D. M. E. Osterhaus
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    Vicki Stover Hertzberg, Howard Weiss
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    Katrin Leitmeyer, Cornelia Adlhoch
    Epidemiology.2016; 27(5): 743.     CrossRef
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    Robert Steffen
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    Anna Vilella, Beatriz Serrano, Maria A. Marcos, Anna Serradesanferm, Josep Mensa, Edward Hayes, Andres Anton, Jose Rios, Tomas Pumarola, Antoni Trilla
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Original Articles
Comparison of Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome Between Korean Emigrants and Host Country Residents in Japan and China-The Korean Emigrant Study
Myung-Hee Shin, Mi Kyung Kim, Zhong Min Li, Hyun-Kyung Oh, Soo Ryang Kim, Miyuki Taniguchi, Jinnv Fang
Epidemiol Health. 2010;32:e2010005.   Published online May 7, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2010005
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Abstract
OBJECTIVES

This study aims to compare the prevalence of metabolic syndrome between Korean emigrants (KEs) and their host country residents in Japan and China.

METHODS

The Korean Emigrant Study (KES) is a cohort study initiated in 2005 to elucidate the effect of genetic susceptibility and environmental change on hypertension, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Equal numbers of KEs and host country residents, aged 30 or over, were recruited from three regions; Kobe-Osaka in Japan (total number=965), Yanbian in China (n=1,019), and Changchun in China (n=949).

RESULTS

The age-adjusted prevalences of metabolic syndrome among KEs in Kobe-Osaka were significantly higher than those among Japanese (in men 24.0% vs. 15.6%, p=0.04, in women 8.4% vs. 2.7%, p=0.01), while the age-adjusted prevalences among KEs in Changchun were similar to those among Chinese (in men 11.7% vs. 16.1%, p=0.37, in women 28.3% vs. 30.1%, p=0.91). The age-adjusted prevalences were generally higher in Yanbian than other regions, and KEs had higher prevalence than Chinese in men but not in women (in men 37.9% vs. 28.3%, p=0.03, women 46.0% vs. 50.6%, p=0.44). The components with significant ethnic differences in prevalence were high blood pressure and abdominal obesity in Japan, and triglyceride in China. The most influential component in diagnosing metabolic syndrome was abdominal obesity in men and triglyceride in women.

CONCLUSION

The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was higher in KEs than in host country residents in Japan but not in China. Abdominal obesity and triglyceride are both discriminating and influential components in metabolic syndrome.

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  • New Common and Rare Variants Influencing Metabolic Syndrome and Its Individual Components in a Korean Population
    Ho-Sun Lee, Yongkang Kim, Taesung Park
    Scientific Reports.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Yeonjung Kim, Bok-Ghee Han
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    Hyeonkyeong Lee, Sunghye Cho, Yune Kyong Kim, Jung Hee Kim
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    Soo Ki Kim, Myung-Hee Shin, Kayo Sugimoto, Soo Ryang Kim, Susumu Imoto, Ke Ih Kim, Miyuki Taniguchi, Hyun-Kyung Oh, Yoshihiko Yano, Yoshitake Hayashi, Masatoshi Kudo
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Relations of Pulse Wave Velocity to Waist Circumference Independent of Hip Circumference
Min Jung Ko, Mi Kyung Kim, Jinho Shin, Bo Youl Choi
Epidemiol Health. 2010;32:e2010004.   Published online May 3, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2010004
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Abstract
OBJECTIVES

Little is known about the effect of waist circumference (WC) on brachial artery pulse wave velocity (baPWV) independent of hip circumference (HC). Therefore, this study aimed to dissociate specific effect of WC on baPWV independent of HC.

METHODS

Of 1,053 rural residents (2004-2005), 777 subjects with no known history of coronary artery diseases or diabetes mellitus over 40 yr were included. To reduce collinearity, we assessed the independent effect of WC with HC on PWV by residual method (WC [RM]).

RESULTS

In women, most correlation coefficients were significant between measures of abdominal obesity and baPWV, with the highest (0.32) in waist to hip ratio (WHR), whereas no significance was found in men. All mean values of baPWV among the abdominally obese were higher than those of normal group in women, which were in the order of WHR, WC (RM), and WC. Adjusted OR with 95% CI for baPWV was significantly elevated by increase of WC (RM) upto 4.8 (95% CI: 2.1-11.2), and as 4.3 by WHR (95% CI: 1.6-11.4).

CONCLUSION

Considering the difficulty in biologically interpreting WHR, WC (RM) may be a useful indicator of abdominal obesity among females in that it reflects the risk of pulse wave velocity.

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    Sahar Sobhani, Saba Vakili, Dina Javid Jam, Reihaneh Aryan, Majid Khadem‐Rezaiyan, Saeid Eslami, Maryam Alinezhad‐Namaghi
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Cardiovascular Risk Factors for Incident Hypertension in the Prehypertensive Population
Soo Jeong Kim, Jakyoung Lee, Sun Ha Jee, Chung Mo Nam, Kihong Chun, Il Soo Park, Soon Young Lee
Epidemiol Health. 2010;32:e2010003.   Published online May 1, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2010003
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  • 16 Citations
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Abstract
OBJECTIVES

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of changes in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors on progression from prehypertension (PreHTN) to hypertension (HTN) using an 8-yr prospective Korean Cancer Prevention Study (KCPS) by the National Health Insurance Corporation (NHIC) in Korea.

METHODS

A total of 16,229 subjects, aged 30 to 54, with new onset preHTN at baseline (1994-1996) in a biennial national medical exam were selected and followed up till 2004 at 2-yr intervals. All subjects underwent a biennial health examination including biochemical measurements and behavior. The log-rank test was performed to assess the relationship between changes in CVD risk factors and progression to HTN. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to identify factors influencing progression to HTN.

RESULTS

With regards the progression rate in men, ex-smokers (42.9%), abstainers (37.5%), and regular exercisers (37.6%) showed a slower progression rate than continuous smokers (49.5%) and continuous drinkers (50.9%). In women, those who participated in regular exercise (22.6%) had a lower rate of progression than continuous non-exercisers (36.1%). According to the results of the Cox proportional hazard model, improvements in smoking (hazard ratio [HR], 0.756), drinking (HR, 0.669), regular exercise (HR, 0.653), body mass index (HR, 0.715), and total cholesterol (HR, 0.788) played a protective role in progression to HTN in men, while in women, participating in regular exercise (HR, 0.534) was beneficial.

CONCLUSION

Improvements in CVD-related behaviors diminished the progression rate of HTN. This study suggests that individuals with PreHTN should be targeted for specific health behavioral intervention to prevent the progression of HTN.

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Brief Communication
A Fatal Case of Disseminated Tuberculosis Coincident with Measles-Rubella Vaccination
Hae-Kwan Cheong, Byung-Guk Yang, Young Mo Sohn, Il-Hoon Kwon, Jun Chul Kim, Hangmi Kim, Jung Ran Kim
Epidemiol Health. 2010;32:e2010002.   Published online April 26, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2010002
  • 12,401 View
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Abstract

The authors report a fatal case of disseminated tuberculosis in a 14-yr-old girl, which developed immediately after a measles-rubella (MR) vaccination. Despite a markedly accelerated clinical course which led to death within two weeks, the authors could not identify any possible cause of the tuberculosis aggravation in this case, with the exception of the MR vaccination. The possible role that MR vaccination had on the clinical course of tuberculosis in this case is discussed.

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Original Article
Green Tea Consumption and Stomach Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis
Hyunseok Kang, Sun Young Rha, Kyung Won Oh, Chung Mo Nam
Epidemiol Health. 2010;32:e2010001.   Published online April 26, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2010001
  • 14,374 View
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  • 26 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES

Green tea has been suggested to have a chemopreventive effect against various cancers including stomach cancer. The aim of this study is to elucidate the relationship between green tea consumption and stomach cancer risk by meta-analysis.

METHODS

Eighteen observational studies were identified using MEDLINE, THE COCHRANE LIBRARY, RISS, and a manual search. Summary relative risks/odds ratios (RR/ORs) for the highest versus non/lowest green tea consumption levels were calculated on the basis of fixed and random effect models. Subgroup analyses were used to examine heterogeneity across the studies.

RESULTS

The combined results indicate a reduced risk of stomach cancer with intake of green tea (RR/OR=0.86, 95% CI=0.74-1.00). Subgroup analysis with six studies that reported differences between the highest and lowest consumption levels equal to or greater than five cups/day revealed a statistically significant protective effect (RR/OR=0.68, 95% CI=0.53-0.87).

CONCLUSION

Green tea appears to play a protective role against the development of stomach cancer. The results also suggest that a higher level of green tea consumption might be needed for a clear preventive effect to appear. This conclusion, however, should be interpreted with caution because various biases can affect the results of a meta-analysis.

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Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health