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Epidemiol Health > Accepted Articles
Epidemiology and Health 2022;e2022050.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2022050    [Accepted] Published online May 30, 2022.
Relationship between metabolic syndrome and its components with bladder cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis in cohort studies
Mozhgan Ahmadinezhad1  , Maedeh Arshadi1  , Elahe Hesari1  , Maedeh Sharafoddin1  , Hosein Azizi2  , Farzad Khodamoradi3 
1Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
2Research Center of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
3Department of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran
Correspondence  Farzad Khodamoradi ,Email: f_khodamoradi@yahoo.com
Received: Feb 5, 2022  Accepted after revision: May 30, 2022
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:
Previous meta-analysis study entitled “the association between metabolic syndrome and bladder cancer susceptibility and prognosis: an updated comprehensive evidence synthesis of 95 observational studies involving 97,795,299 subjects”, focused on all observational studies, but in this meta-analysis study, we focused on cohort studies to obtain more accurate and stronger evidence to evaluate the association between metabolic syndrome and its component with bladder cancer in cohort studies.
METHODS:
PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, and Web of Science were searched to identify studies on the association between metabolic syndrome and its component with bladder cancer from January 1, 2000, through May 23, 2021. The pooled relative risk (RR) and the 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to measure this relationship by assuming a random effects meta-analytic model. Quality appraisal was undertaken using the Newcastle - Ottawa Critical Appraisal Tool.
RESULTS:
A total of 56 studies were included. Our study revealed that there was a statistically significant relationship between metabolic syndrome and bladder cancer 1.09 [95% CI: 1.02, 1.17] and there was evidence of moderate heterogeneity among these studies. Also, our findings indicated a statistically significant relationship between diabetes1.23 [95% CI: 1.16, 1.31] and hypertension1.07 [95% CI: 1.01, 1.13] with bladder cancer, but no association was found between obesity and overweight and bladder cancer. We found no evidence of publication bias.
CONCLUSIONS:
Our analysis demonstrated a statistically significant relationship between metabolic syndrome and the risk of bladder cancer. Diabetes and hypertension had a relationship with the risk of bladder cancer.
Keywords: bladder cancer; meta-analysis; metabolic syndrome; metabolic syndrome components; cohort


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