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COVID-19: Original Article
Risk of lymphadenopathy from SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in Korea: a self-controlled case series analysis
Mi-Sook Kim, Bongyoung Kim, Jeong Pil Choi, Nam-Kyong Choi, Jung Yeon Heo, Jun Yong Choi, Joongyub Lee, Sang Il Kim
Epidemiol Health. 2023;45:e2023090.   Published online October 13, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2023090
  • 5,395 View
  • 133 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
To assess the risk of lymphadenopathy following severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccination.
METHODS
A self-controlled case series design was used to determine whether the risk of lymphadenopathy was higher in the 1-day to 42-day risk interval after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination compared to the control period. In addition, subgroup analyses were conducted according to baseline characteristics, time since vaccination, and sensitivity analyses adjusted for the length of the risk interval.
RESULTS
The risk of developing lymphadenopathy in the risk interval (1-42 days) after COVID-19 vaccination compared to the control period was significantly increased, with a relative incidence (RI) of 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17 to 1.18) when the first, second, and third doses were combined. The RI was greater on the day of vaccination (1.47; 95% CI, 1.44 to 1.50). In subgroup analyses by baseline characteristics, a significantly increased risk or trend toward increased risk was observed in most subgroups except for those aged 70 years and older, with a significant increase in risk in younger individuals, those with a Charlson’s comorbidity index <5, and those who received mRNA vaccines (mRNA-1273>BNT162b2). Within the 1-day to 42-day post-dose risk period, the relative risk was highest during the 1-day to 7-day post-dose period (1.59; 95% CI, 1.57 to 1.60) compared to the control period, and then the risk declined. In the sensitivity analysis, we found that the longer the risk window, the smaller the RI.
CONCLUSIONS
SARS-CoV-2 vaccination is associated with a statistically significant increase in the risk of lymphadenopathy, and this risk was observed only with mRNA vaccines.
Summary
Korean summary
질병관리청의 코로나19 예방접종자료와 국민건강보험공단 자료를 이용하여 수행한 본 자기대조환자군 연구에서 코로나19 백신접종은 42일 내 림프절병증 발생위험을 1.17배 (95% 신뢰구간, 1.17-1.18) 증가시키는 것으로 나타났다. 이러한 위험의 증가는 mRNA 백신에 국한하여 관찰되었으며 연령이 낮을수록, 여성일수록 상대위험도가 높은 것으로 나타났다.
Key Message
This self-controlled case series study, using the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency COVID-19 vaccination database and the National Health Insurance Service database, showed an increased risk of developing lymphadenopathy following vaccination (RR 1.17; 95% CI, 1.17 to 1.18). The elevated risk of lymphadenopathy is specifically associated with mRNA platform vaccines, not viral vector vaccines, and is more pronounced in younger individuals and females.
COVID-19: Original Article
Effective vaccination strategies to control COVID-19 in Korea: a modeling study
Youngsuk Ko, Kyong Ran Peck, Yae-Jean Kim, Dong-Hyun Kim, Eunok Jung
Epidemiol Health. 2023;45:e2023084.   Published online September 7, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2023084
  • 5,431 View
  • 122 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
In Korea, as immunity levels of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the population acquired through previous infections and vaccinations have decreased, booster vaccinations have emerged as a necessary measure to control new outbreaks. The objective of this study was to identify the most suitable vaccination strategy for controlling the surge in COVID-19 cases.
METHODS
A mathematical model was developed to concurrently evaluate the immunity levels induced by vaccines and infections. This model was then employed to investigate the potential for future resurgence and the possibility of control through the use of vaccines and antivirals.
RESULTS
As of May 11, 2023, if the current epidemic trend persists without further vaccination efforts, a peak in resurgence is anticipated to occur around mid-October of the same year. Under the most favorable circumstances, the peak number of severely hospitalized patients could be reduced by 43% (n=480) compared to the scenario without vaccine intervention (n=849). Depending on outbreak trends and vaccination strategies, the best timing for vaccination in terms of minimizing this peak varies from May 2023 to August 2023.
CONCLUSIONS
Our findings suggest that if the epidemic persist, the best timing for administering vaccinations would need to be earlier than currently outlined in the Korean plan. It is imperative to continue monitoring outbreak trends, as this is key to determining the best vaccination timing in order to manage potential future surges.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구는 자연감염 혹은 백신으로 획득된 면역의 저하를 고려한 수리모델을 사용하여 COVID-19에 대한 백신 접종 전략 분석 결과를 보인다. 시뮬레이션 결과는 추가 백신 접종이 없을 경우 재유행의 정점이 800명을 넘을 것임을 나타내며, 적절한 시기에 백신을 접종하면 최대 재원 위중증환자수를 약 40%까지 줄일 수 있음을 보인다. 본 연구는 확진자 추세의 지속적인 모니터링이 백신 접종의 적정 시기를 결정하고 미래 COVID-19의 재유행을 효과적으로 관리하는 데 필요하다는 점을 강조한다.
Key Message
Our study analyzes strategies for COVID-19 through vaccination, using a mathematical model considering waning immunity from past infections and vaccinations. Results indicate that a resurgence peak would reach more than 800 without further vaccination, and suggest vaccination in proper timing can reduce the peak size of administered severe patients by up to approximately 40%. The study emphasizes the importance of ongoing monitoring of outbreak trends to manage vaccination timing and future COVID-19 surges effectively.
COVID-19: Original Article
Parental concerns about COVID-19 vaccine safety and hesitancy in Korea: implications for vaccine communication
Hye-Kyung Cho, Hyunju Lee, Young June Choe, Shinkyeong Kim, Sujin Seo, Jiwon Moon, Eun Hwa Choi, Geun-Yong Kwon, Jee Yeon Shin, Sang-Yoon Choi, Mi Jin Jeong, Myoungsoon You
Epidemiol Health. 2023;45:e2023004.   Published online December 13, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2023004
  • 5,647 View
  • 143 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Vaccination is one of the most important strategies to contain the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Vaccination in children is dependent on their parents, making it important to understand parents’ awareness and attitudes toward vaccines in order to devise strategies to raise vaccination rates in children.
METHODS
A web-based nationwide survey was conducted among Korean parents of 7-year-old to 18-year-old children in August 2021 to estimate parents’ intention to vaccinate their children against COVID-19 and identify key factors affecting parental acceptance and hesitancy through regression analysis.
RESULTS
Approximately 56.4% (575/1,019) were willing to vaccinate their children against COVID-19. Contributing factors to COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy were being a mother (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.25 to 0.52), a lower education level (aOR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.70 to 0.97), hesitancy to other childhood vaccines (aOR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.64 to 0.96), and refusal to vaccinate themselves (aOR, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.20). Having older children (aOR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.13 to 1.28), trusting the child’s doctor (aOR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.32), positive perceptions of the COVID-19 vaccine’s effectiveness (aOR, 2.60; 95% CI, 1.90 to 3.57) and perceiving the COVID-19 vaccine as low-risk (aOR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.27 to 2.24) were associated with COVID-19 vaccine acceptance. Concerns about adverse reactions were the most common cause of hesitancy.
CONCLUSIONS
Providing parents with accurate and reliable information on vaccine effectiveness and safety is important to increase COVID-19 vaccine uptake in children. Differential or targeted approaches to parents according to gender, age, and their children’s age are necessary for effective communication about vaccination in children.
Summary
Korean summary
부모에게 백신 효과와 안전성에 대한 정확하고 믿을만한 정보를 제공하는 것이 소아 코로나19 백신 접종률을 높이는데 중요하다. 자녀의 백신 접종에 대한 의사소통을 효율적으로 하기 위해서는 부모의 성별과 연령, 자녀의 연령을 고려한 차별적인 접근 방법이 필요하다.
Key Message
To improve COVID-19 vaccine uptake in children, it's crucial to provide parents with reliable and precise information about vaccine safety and effectiveness. Targeted communication strategies that consider factors such as the age of the parents and their children, as well as gender, may be necessary to effectively convey this information.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Safety of BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 vaccine in children with chronic kidney disease: a national population study from South Korea
    Young June Choe, Yo-Han Ahn, Eunsun Gwak, Eunseo Jo, Jinseob Kim, Seung-Ah Choe
    Pediatric Nephrology.2024; 39(2): 625.     CrossRef
  • Assessing the determinants of influenza and COVID-19 vaccine co-administration decisions in the elderly
    Seunghyun Lewis Kwon, So-Yeon Kim, Minju Song, Hyung-Min Lee, Seon-Hwa Ban, Mi-Soon Lee, Hyesun Jeong
    Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Descriptive cross-sectional study to evaluate perception, attitude, and practice of parents regarding COVID-19 vaccination in children 10–12 years of age—A step toward prevention of future COVID-19 outbreaks in India
    Vivek Mehta, Deep Inder, Pawan Kumar, Anupma Raheja
    Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care.2024; 13(5): 2104.     CrossRef
  • Willingness and hesitancy of parents to vaccinate against COVID-19 their children ages 6 months to 4 years with frail conditions in Italy
    Grazia Miraglia del Giudice, Giorgia Della Polla, Mario Postiglione, Italo Francesco Angelillo
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
COVID-19: Brief Communication
Dynamics of hospitalizations and in-hospital deaths from COVID-19 in northeast Brazil: a retrospective analysis based on the circulation of SARS-CoV-2 variants and vaccination coverage
Paulo Ricardo Martins-Filho, Adriano Antunes de Souza Araújo, Lucindo José Quintans-Júnior, Bárbara dos Santos Soares, Waneska de Souza Barboza, Taise Ferreira Cavalcante, Victor Santana Santos
Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022036.   Published online April 5, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2022036
  • 8,906 View
  • 341 Download
  • 12 Web of Science
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Abstract
This study investigated the dynamics of hospitalizations and in-hospital deaths from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) throughout the pandemic in northeast Brazil, the Brazilian region with the worst socioeconomic indicators. In total, 141,445 cases, 8,213 hospital admissions, and 1,644 in-hospital deaths from COVID-19 were registered from March 14, 2020 to February 5, 2022. The overall rates of hospitalization and in-hospital deaths were 5.8% and 20.0%, respectively. The hospitalization and death rates significantly decreased over time, which may have been related to progress in vaccination. During the spread of the Gamma variant (January to June 2021), most hospitalized individuals were young adults, and approximately 40% of deaths occurred in this age group. During the predominance of Delta (July to December 2021), over 75% of deaths occurred among the elderly and unvaccinated or partially vaccinated individuals. This rate decreased to 42.3% during the transmission of the Omicron variant (January to February 2022), during which 34.6% of deaths were recorded among fully vaccinated individuals (2 doses) and 23.1% among those who received full vaccination and a booster. The Omicron-driven third wave was associated with a rise in the proportion of deaths among vaccinated individuals, especially among those who had not received a booster dose.
Summary
Key Message
The Omicron-driven third wave in Brazil was associated with a rise in the proportion of deaths among vaccinated individuals, especially among those who had not received a booster dose

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Understanding SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein clusters and their impact on immunity of the population from Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil
    Diego Gomes Teixeira, João Firmino Rodrigues-Neto, Dayse Caroline Severiano da Cunha, Selma Maria Bezerra Jeronimo
    Infection, Genetics and Evolution.2024; 118: 105556.     CrossRef
  • The Effectiveness of Vaccination on the COVID-19 Epidemic in California
    Elijah Huang, Siddharth Kurkure, Yui Seo, Kristie Lau, Jose Puglisi
    American Journal of Infection Control.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Case-fatality rates and risk of death from COVID-19 and influenza A/H3N2 in Brazil: A nationwide ecological study
    Paulo Ricardo Martins-Filho, Jerocílio Maciel de Oliveira Júnior, Cliomar Alves dos Santos
    Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica.2023; 41(3): 199.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2 infection and mortality in pediatric patients with hematological malignancies and solid tumors
    João Eduardo Andrade Tavares de Aguiar, Marcos Antônio Lima Carvalho, Simone Santana Viana, Paulo Ricardo Martins-Filho, Rosana Cipolotti
    Pediatric Hematology and Oncology.2023; 40(4): 429.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Epidemiologic and Clinical COVID-19 Profiles in Children in Argentina, During Circulation of Original and Variant (Alpha, Gamma and Lambda) Strains
    Angela Gentile, María Del Valle Juárez, Lucia Romero Bollon, Valeria Aprea, Erika Matteucci, Andrea Falaschi, Martin Brizuela, Cristina Euliarte, Gabriela Gregorio, Maria Paula Della Latta, Carlota Russ, Gabriela Nidia Ensinck, Liliana Saraceni, Miriam Br
    Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal.2023; 42(2): 136.     CrossRef
  • Case-fatality rates and risk of death from COVID-19 and influenza A/H3N2 in Brazil: A nationwide ecological study
    Paulo Ricardo Martins-Filho, Jerocílio Maciel de Oliveira Júnior, Cliomar Alves dos Santos
    Enfermedades infecciosas y microbiologia clinica (English ed.).2023; 41(3): 199.     CrossRef
  • Impact of inactivated vaccines on decrease of viral RNA levels in individuals with the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron (BA.2) variant: A retrospective cohort study in Shanghai, China
    Peng Yang, Bianli Dang, Wen Kang, Xiaofeng Li, Tianping Wang, Ruijuan Li, Meijuan Peng, Yushen Liu, Linxu Wang, Yan Cheng, Suhuai Yu, Min Wei, Han Gao, Wenzhen Kang, Lei Shang
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison of the disease severity with infection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS‐CoV‐2) Delta and Omicron variants: A meta‐analysis
    Ying Qiu, Zhenghao Li, Fan Lin, Yilin Yang, Lanxuan Yang, Ting Li
    MedComm – Future Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical Characteristics and Risk Factors for Mortality in Critical COVID-19 Patients Aged 50 Years or Younger During Omicron Wave in Korea: Comparison With Patients Older Than 50 Years of Age
    Hye Jin Shi, Jinyoung Yang, Joong Sik Eom, Jae-Hoon Ko, Kyong Ran Peck, Uh Jin Kim, Sook In Jung, Seulki Kim, Hyeri Seok, Miri Hyun, Hyun Ah Kim, Bomi Kim, Eun-Jeong Joo, Hae Suk Cheong, Cheon Hoo Jun, Yu Mi Wi, Jungok Kim, Sungmin Kym, Seungjin Lim, Yoon
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection among urban cleaning and solid waste management workers during transmission of the Omicron variant in Brazil
    Paulo Ricardo Martins-Filho, Joyce Thayane da Conceição dos Santos, Márcia Santos Rezende, Fernanda Oliveira de Carvalho, Érica Santos dos Reis, Waneska de Souza Barboza, Taise Ferreira Cavalcante, Cliomar Alves dos Santos, Lucindo José Quintans-Júnior,
    Epidemiology and Health.2023; 45: e2023025.     CrossRef
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    Taimoor Ahmad, Mujahid Abdullah, Abdul Mueed, Faisal Sultan, Ayesha Khan, Adnan Ahmad Khan, Huzaifa Ahmad Cheema
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(12): e0281326.     CrossRef
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    Moises Thiago de Souza Freitas, Ludmila Oliveira Carvalho Sena, Kiyoshi Ferreira Fukutani, Cliomar Alves dos Santos, Francisco das Chagas Barros Neto, Julienne Sousa Ribeiro, Erica Santos dos Reis, Valdir de Queiroz Balbino, Sérgio de Sá Paiva Leitão, Mar
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  • Clinical symptom profile of hospitalized COVID-19 Brazilian patients according to SARS-CoV-2 variants
    Natália Satchiko Hojo-Souza, Vander Luis de Souza Freitas, Daniel Ludovico Guidoni, Fernanda Sumika Hojo de Souza
    Epidemiology and Health.2023; 45: e2023079.     CrossRef
Perspective
Measles susceptibility of marriage migrant women in Korea
Sooyeon Kim, Sun A Kim, Hanbich Hong, Seong Ryeong Choi, Hae-Young Na, Sung Un Shin, Kyung-Hwa Park, Sook In Jung, Min-Ho Shin, Sun-Seog Kweon, Seung Ji Kang
Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022031.   Published online March 12, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2022031
  • 7,132 View
  • 365 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Abstract
International migrants could be considered a risk group susceptible to vaccine-preventable diseases. We conducted a measles seroprevalence study among 419 marriage migrant women living in Sinan-gun and Wando-gun, South Jeolla Province, located in the southwestern part of Korea. The overall seroimmunity was 92.8%. The seroimmunity varied considerably according to the country of origin and increased with age. Our current analysis could be valuable in the context of discussions concerning vaccination policies for immigrants in Korea.
Summary
Korean summary
전라남도 신안군과 완도군에 거주하는 결혼이주여성 419명을 대상으로 홍역항체 양성률을 조사하였다. 전체적 항체양성률은 92.8% 로 높았으나, 나이로 나누어 분석하였을 때, 30세 미만에서는 83.1% 로 30세 이상의 95.5% 에 비해 통계적으로 유의미하게 낮았다. 출신국가에 따른 분석에서는 캄보디아 출신의 경우 30세 미만에서 항체 양성률이 40.0 % 에 불과하여, 타국가 들에 비해 통계적으로 유의미하게 낮았다.
Key Message
To prevent measles resurgence, continuous monitoring of immunity in communities, including foreign-born populations who may have different serostatus, is essential.
COVID-19: Original Article
The age-standardized incidence, mortality, and case fatality rates of COVID-19 in 79 countries: a cross-sectional comparison and their correlations with associated factors
Dongui Hong, Sohyae Lee, Yoon-Jung Choi, Sungji Moon, Yoonyoung Jang, Yoon-Min Cho, Hyojung Lee, Sukhong Min, Hyeree Park, Seokyung Hahn, Ji-Yeob Choi, Aesun Shin, Daehee Kang
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021061.   Published online September 8, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2021061
  • 21,491 View
  • 366 Download
  • 11 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, crude incidence and mortality rates have been widely reported; however, age-standardized rates are more suitable for comparisons. In this study, we estimated and compared the age-standardized incidence, mortality, and case fatality rates (CFRs) among countries and investigated the relationship between these rates and factors associated with healthcare resources: gross domestic product per capita, number of hospital beds per population, and number of doctors per population.
METHODS
The incidence, mortality, and CFRs of 79 countries were age-standardized using the World Health Organization standard population. The rates for persons 60 years or older were also calculated. The relationships among the rates were analysed using trend lines and coefficients of determination (R<sup>2</sup>). Pearson correlation coefficients between the rates and the healthcare resource-related factors were calculated.
RESULTS
The countries with the highest age-standardized incidence, mortality, and CFRs were Czechia (14,253 cases/100,000), Mexico (182 deaths/100,000), and Mexico (6.7%), respectively. The R<sup>2</sup> between the incidence and mortality rates was 0.852 for all ages and 0.945 for those 60 years or older. The healthcare resources-related factors were associated positively with incidence rates and negatively with CFRs, with weaker correlations among the elderly.
CONCLUSIONS
Compared to age-standardized rates, crude rates showed greater variation among countries. Medical resources may be important in preventing COVID-19-related deaths; however, considering the small variation in fatality among the elderly, preventive measures such as vaccination are more important, especially for the elderly population, to minimize the mortality rates.
Summary
Korean summary
국가별 발생률, 사망률, 치명률을 WHO 표준 인구로 연령표준화하였고, 의료자원과 관계된 지표와의 상관관계를 파악하였다. 2021년 4월 6일 기준, 연령표준화 발생률, 사망률, 치명률이 가장 높은 나라는 각각 체코 (10만명당 14,253명), 멕시코 (10만명당 182명), 멕시코 (6.7%)이며, 60세 이상 노인은 사망률과 치명률이 더 높은 것으로 나타났다. 1인당GDP, 인구당 의사 수, 인구당 병상 수는 발생률과 양의 상관관계가, 치명률과는 음의 상관관계가 있었고 노인에게서는 상관관계가 약하게 나타났다. 코로나바이러스감염증-19로 인한 피해를 최소화하기 위해서 의료자원의 투입과 더불어 노인의 감염예방이 중요할 것이다.
Key Message
The incidence, mortality, and case fatality rates of 79 countries were age-standardized using the WHO standard population. The correlations between the rates and the healthcare resource-related factors were investigated. As of April 6, 2021, the countries with the highest age-standardized incidence, mortality, and case fatality rates were Czechia (14,253 cases/100,000), Mexico (182 deaths/100,000), and Mexico (6.7%), respectively; the mortality and case fatality rates were higher among the elderly. GDP per capita, number of hospital beds per population, and number of doctors per population were associated positively with incidence rate, and negatively with case fatality rates: the correlations were weaker among the elderly. To minimize the burden caused by COVID-19, preventing the elderly from infection is important as well as supply of medical resources.

Citations

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Original Articles
Recent increase in pertussis incidence in Korea: an age-period-cohort analysis
Chanhee Kim, Seonju Yi, Sung-il Cho
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021053.   Published online August 18, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2021053
  • 9,538 View
  • 181 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Pertussis or whooping cough—one of the most contagious diseases—is caused by the Gram-negative bacterium <i>Bordetella pertussis</i>. Despite a high vaccination rate, Korea recently experienced a resurgence of pertussis. This study explores patterns and possible explanations for this resurgence through an age-period-cohort analysis.
METHODS
Using secondary data from the infectious disease portal of the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency and the Korea Statistical Information Service of Statistics Korea, this study analyzed the incidence of pertussis in Korea to determine which factors contributed to the recent increase using an age-period-cohort model.
RESULTS
Analysis of the age effect indicated that the age group most vulnerable to pertussis was 0-year to 2-year-olds. Analysis of the period effect showed a sharp increase in the incidence rate after 2016. Analysis of the cohort effect showed a significant decrease in incidence beginning with the 1955 birth cohort, with the risk increasing again with the 2000s birth cohort.
CONCLUSIONS
Previous studies have suggested 3 main possible explanations for our results. First, the increased incidence rate can be attributed to contact rates. Second, the rate of immunity through natural exposure has decreased due to the low number of circulating pathogens, in turn affecting the trend of infection. Lastly, variations in pathogens may have also contributed to the increase in incidence. Given that the most significant increase in incidence was observed among infants younger than 1 year old, sufficient maternal immunity must be prioritized to provide passive immunity to newborns via the placenta.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구는 연령-기간-코호트 모델을 활용하여 예방접종률이 높은 국가들의 백일해 재출현에 기여하는 요인에 무엇이 있는지 살펴보았다. 연령에 따른 사회적 접촉률(contact rate)의 변화, 자연노출에 의한 면역 강화(natural boosting) 기회의 감소, 그리고 백일해 병원체의 변이가 백일해 재출현의 원인일 수 있다. 분석 결과 영아 집단에서 백일해 발병률이 가장 급격한 증가가 관찰되었으며, 이는 모성면역의 확보가 중요하다는 점을 시사한다.
Key Message
This study examined factors contribute to the re-emergence of pertussis in countries with high vaccination rates using the age-period-cohort model. Changes in social contact rates according to age, reduction in immune boosting opportunities by natural exposure, and variations in pertussis pathogens may be the cause of re-emergence. As a result of the analysis, the sharpest increase in the incidence of pertussis in the infant group was observed, suggesting that securing maternal immunity is important.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Epidemiological Characteristics of Notifiable Respiratory Infectious Diseases in Mainland China from 2010 to 2018
    Lele Deng, Yajun Han, Jinlong Wang, Haican Liu, Guilian Li, Dayan Wang, Guangxue He
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2023; 20(5): 3946.     CrossRef
  • Incidence and Healthcare Burden of Pertussis among Older Adults with and without Pre-Existing Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma in South Korea
    Jing Chen, Ju-Young Shin, Hyungwoo Kim, Ju Hwan Kim, Ahhyung Choi, Hee Jin Cheong, Yeon-Mok Oh, Adrienne Guignard, Sumitra Shantakumar
    COPD: Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.2023; 20(1): 126.     CrossRef
  • Pre-Pandemic Distribution of Bacterial Species in Nasopharyngeal Swab Specimens from Pediatric and Adult Patients Detected via RT-PCR Using the Allplex Respiratory Panel
    Dong-Hyun Lee, Young-Jin Choi, Jieun Kim, Eunhee Han, Mi-Hyun Bae
    Life.2023; 13(9): 1840.     CrossRef
  • Bacterial Etiology in Subacute Cough
    Ji-Yong Moon, Hyun Lee, Min-Hye Kim, Woo-Jung Song, Sang Min Lee, Sae-Hoon Kim, Sang-Heon Kim, Byung-Jae Lee, Ho Joo Yoon, Sang Hoon Kim
    Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Research.2023; 15(5): 673.     CrossRef
  • Post-Marketing Surveillance of Tetravalent Diphtheria-Tetanus-Acellular Pertussis and Inactivated Poliovirus (DTaP-IPV) Vaccine in South Korea, 2009 to 2015
    Young June Choe, Emmanuel Vidor, Christine Manson
    Infectious Diseases and Therapy.2022; 11(4): 1479.     CrossRef
  • ARIMA and ARIMA-ERNN models for prediction of pertussis incidence in mainland China from 2004 to 2021
    Meng Wang, Jinhua Pan, Xinghui Li, Mengying Li, Zhixi Liu, Qi Zhao, Linyun Luo, Haiping Chen, Sirui Chen, Feng Jiang, Liping Zhang, Weibing Wang, Ying Wang
    BMC Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Whole-Cell and Acellular Pertussis Vaccines in the Context of Long-Term Herd Immunity
    Ewa Szwejser-Zawislak, Mieszko M. Wilk, Piotr Piszczek, Justyna Krawczyk, Daria Wilczyńska, Daniela Hozbor
    Vaccines.2022; 11(1): 1.     CrossRef
Dynamics of the COVID-19 epidemic in the post-vaccination period in Korea: a rapid assessment
Kyung-Duk Min, Sangwoo Tak
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021040.   Published online May 27, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2021040
  • 12,170 View
  • 409 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has had a tremendous impact on public health and socioeconomic conditions globally. Although non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) such as social distancing effectively reduced the incidence of COVID-19, especially in Korea, demand for vaccination has increased to minimize the social costs of NPIs. This study estimated the potential benefits of COVID-19 vaccination in Korea.
METHODS
A mathematical model with vaccinated–susceptible–latent–infectious–recovered compartments was used to simulate the COVID-19 epidemic. The compartments were stratified into age groups of 0-19 years, 20-59 years, and 60 years or older. Based on the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency national vaccination plan for the second quarter of 2021, announced on March 15, we developed vaccination scenarios (with 150,000 dose/d and 100% compliance as the main scenario). Comparing scenarios without vaccination or with higher/lower vaccination rates and compliance, we estimated the numbers of COVID-19 cases that will be prevented by vaccination.
RESULTS
The results projected 203,135 cases within a year after April 2021 without vaccination, which would be reduced to 71,248 (64.9% decrease) by vaccination. Supposing a vaccination rate of 150,000 dose/d and 100% compliance, social distancing interventions for those aged 20 or more can be retracted after January 1, 2022.
CONCLUSIONS
We expect COVID-19 vaccination to be effective in Korea. Health authorities should minimize delays in vaccination and vaccine avoidance to maximize the effectiveness of vaccination and end social distancing early.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구에서 국내 백신 접종 시작이후의 코로나19 유행 추이를 수학적 모형을 통하여 예측하였다. 연구 결과, 백신 접종이 전혀 진행되지 않을 경우, 2021년 4월부터 1년간 203,135 건의 확진 사례가 보고될 것으로 예측되었으나, 하루 15만 도즈의 접종이 진행될 경우 같은 기간의 확진자 수를 64.9% 감소시킬 수 있을 것으로 나타났으며, 20세 이상을 대상으로한 사회적 거리두기 정책은 2022년 1월에 중지될 수 있을 것으로 예상되었다.
Key Message
A mathematical model with vaccinated–susceptible–latent–infectious–recovered compartments was used to simulate the COVID-19 epidemic in Korea. The results projected 203,135 cases within a year after April 2021 without vaccination, which would be reduced to 71,248 (64.9% decrease) by vaccination (150,000 doses per day and 100% compliance). Supposing a vaccination rate of 150,000 doses per day and 100% compliance, social distancing intervention for those aged 20 or more can be retracted after January 1, 2022.

Citations

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  • Predictive models for health outcomes due to SARS-CoV-2, including the effect of vaccination: a systematic review
    Oscar Espinosa, Laura Mora, Cristian Sanabria, Antonio Ramos, Duván Rincón, Valeria Bejarano, Jhonathan Rodríguez, Nicolás Barrera, Carlos Álvarez-Moreno, Jorge Cortés, Carlos Saavedra, Adriana Robayo, Oscar H. Franco
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    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Hyojung Lee, Changyong Han, Jooyi Jung, Sunmi Lee
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Systematic Review
Prevalence of high-risk HPV genotypes in sub-Saharan Africa according to HIV status: a 20-year systematic review
Jude Ogechukwu Okoye, Chukwudi Amaechi Ofodile, Oluwaseun Kelechi Adeleke, Okechi Obioma
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021039.   Published online May 25, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2021039
  • 13,976 View
  • 369 Download
  • 21 Web of Science
  • 20 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
This review assessed the rate of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among women living in sub-Saharan Africa. It also determined the prevalence of high-risk HPV (hrHPV) among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive (HIV+) and seronegative (HIV-) women in sub-Saharan Africa, pre-2010 and post-2010.
METHODS
In this systematic review, Google Scholar, PubMed Central, and Embase were searched to identify cohort and case-control studies that investigated the relationship between HIV and HPV infection. The database searches yielded 17 studies published between 1999 and 2018.
RESULTS
In the general population, the prevalence of any HPV/multiple HPV infections was higher among HIV+ (53.6/22.6%) than among HIV- women (26.5/7.3%) with odds ratios of 3.22 and 3.71, respectively (95% confidence interval, 3.00 to 3.42 and 2.39 to 5.75, p< 0.001). The prevalent HPV genotypes among HIV+ and HIV- women diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer (ICC) were HPV-16/18 and HPV-45. The prevalence of HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-45 was lower in 1999-2010 (3.8, 1.7, and 0.8%, respectively) than in 2011-2018 (19.1, 6.0, and 3.6%, respectively). Among women diagnosed with ICC, HIV+ women had a higher prevalence of HPV-56, HPV-31, and HPV-51 (7.3, 5.3, and 3.3%, respectively) than HIV- women (1.3, 2.2, and 0.4%, p< 0.001, p= 0.050, and p= 0.013, respectively).
CONCLUSIONS
The prevalence of HPV infection, multiple HPV infections, and non-vaccine HPV types were higher among HIV+ women than among HIV- women in sub-Saharan Africa. Although HIV infection influences the distribution of HPV types, this study suggests that cervical cancer incidence in sub-Saharan Africa is primarily driven by the prevalence of vaccine hrHPVs, especially HPV-16 and HPV-18.
Summary
Key Message
Despite increasing awareness of Human papillomavirus (HPV) among women and availability of HPV vaccines, mounting evidence shows that the age-standardized incidence rate of cervical cancer is increasing in sub-Saharan Africa. This review revealed the influences of some viruses on the trends of the disease between 1999-2010 and 2011-2018.

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COVID-19: Perspective
COVID-19 herd immunity in the absence of a vaccine: an irresponsible approach
Jade Khalife, Derrick VanGennep
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021012.   Published online February 3, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2021012
  • 11,919 View
  • 374 Download
  • 11 Web of Science
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Abstract
As severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) continues to spread rapidly throughout the human population, the concept of “herd immunity” has attracted the attention of both decision-makers and the general public. In the absence of a vaccine, this entails that a large proportion of the population will be infected to develop immunity that would limit the severity and/or extent of subsequent outbreaks. We argue that adopting such an approach should be avoided for several reasons. There are significant uncertainties about whether achieving herd immunity is possible. If possible, achieving herd immunity would impose a large burden on society. There are gaps in protection, making it difficult to shield the vulnerable. It would defeat the purpose of avoiding harm caused by the virus. Lastly, dozens of countries are showing that containment is possible.
Summary
Key Message
Pursuing herd immunity without a vaccine involves numerous uncertainties, is costly in terms of lives and disease, is ineffective, and - being unethical and uncompassionate - is not compatible with human dignity and development.

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