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Original Article
Knowledge, attitudes, and behavioural risk factors regarding zoonotic infections among bushmeat hunters and traders in Nsukka, southeast Nigeria
Kingsley Uchenna Ozioko, Chris Ikem Okoye, Rose Nduka Obiezue, Raymond Awudu Agbu
Epidemiol Health. 2018;40:e2018025.   Published online June 16, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2018025
  • 12,942 View
  • 255 Download
  • 13 Web of Science
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
In light of the dramatic spread of Ebola virus in some parts of Africa and the 2014 outbreak in Nigeria, a study was conducted to evaluate bushmeat dealers’ knowledge and attitudes about zoonotic infections and the risk of transmission to humans.
METHODS
A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a community in Nsukka, southeast Nigeria. Hunters (n=34) and bushmeat traders (n=42) were interviewed. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to generate the data. The Fisher exact test was used to evaluate the significance of differences between these groups.
RESULTS
Only 11.8% of the hunters, as compared to 35.7% of the traders, had no knowledge of possible causes of zoonotic infections (p<0.05). However, 64.7% of the hunters, compared to 38.1% of the traders, were ignorant regarding the responsibility of public health personnel and veterinarians (p<0.05), and 76.5% of the hunters compared to 42.9% of the traders were ignorant regarding the existence of zoonoses in Nigeria (p<0.05). A statistically significant difference was also found between these groups regarding the risk of contracting an infection from ectoparasites (p<0.05). The attitudes of respondents towards zoonotic diseases did not differ significantly between the groups.
CONCLUSIONS
The level of awareness about zoonotic diseases was low in this area, underscoring the need for interventions.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The re-emergence and transmission of Monkeypox virus in Nigeria: the role of one health
    Seto C. Ogunleye, Olalekan C. Akinsulie, Abdullahi T. Aborode, Mercy M. Olorunshola, Damilola Gbore, Moyinoluwa Oladoye, Ridwan O. Adesola, Joy O. Gbadegoye, Boluwatife J. Olatoye, Mariam A. Lawal, Akeem B. Bakare, Oluwabori Adekanye, Ezemba C. Chinyere
    Frontiers in Public Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, perceptions, and practices around zoonotic diseases among actors in the livestock trade in the Lake Victoria crescent ecosystem in East Africa
    Hamilton Majiwa, Salome A. Bukachi, Dalmas Omia, Eric M. Fèvre
    Frontiers in Public Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Human-animal entanglements in bushmeat trading in Sierra Leone: An ethnographic assessment of a potential zoonotic interface
    Jack Jenkins, Wahab Lawundeh, Tommy Hanson, Hannah Brown, Daniel Oladimeji Oluwayelu
    PLOS ONE.2024; 19(3): e0298929.     CrossRef
  • Zoonoses in a changing world
    Jaime García-Moreno
    BioScience.2023; 73(10): 711.     CrossRef
  • A systematic mapping review of links between handling wild meat and zoonotic diseases
    Luke Tumelty, Julia E. Fa, Lauren Coad, Sagan Friant, Joseph Mbane, Cedric Thibaut Kamogne, Caleb Yengo Tata, Amy Ickowitz
    One Health.2023; 17: 100637.     CrossRef
  • Public and health professional epidemic risk perceptions in countries that are highly vulnerable to epidemics: a systematic review
    Nada Abdelmagid, Francesco Checchi, Bayard Roberts
    Infectious Diseases of Poverty.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, attitudes, and practices associated with zoonotic disease transmission risk in North Sulawesi, Indonesia
    Tina Kusumaningrum, Alice Latinne, Stephanie Martinez, Jusuf Kalengkongan, Ageng Wiyatno, Aghnianditya Kresno Dewantari, Novie Kasenda, Janno B. B. Bernadus, Ungke Anton Jaya, Chairin Nisa Ma’roef, Leilani Francisco, Emily Hagan, Maureen Miller, Khin Saw
    One Health Outlook.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence assessment of ectoparasitic arthropods among commonly consumed wildlife in Nsukka, southeast Nigeria
    Kingsley Uchenna Ozioko, Chris Ikem Okoye, Patience Obiageli Ubachukwu, Raymond Awudu Agbu, Bede Izuchukwu Ezewudo, Celestine Osita Ezea
    Bulletin of the National Research Centre.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Pre- and post-Ebola outbreak trends in wild meat trade in West Africa
    Stephan M. Funk, Julia E. Fa, Stephanie N. Ajong, Edem A. Eniang, Daniele Dendi, Massimiliano Di Vittorio, Fabio Petrozzi, NioKing Amadi, Godfrey C. Akani, Luca Luiselli
    Biological Conservation.2021; 255: 109024.     CrossRef
  • Reemergence of Human Monkeypox and Declining Population Immunity in the Context of Urbanization, Nigeria, 2017–2020
    Phi-Yen Nguyen, Whenayon Simeon Ajisegiri, Valentina Costantino, Abrar A. Chughtai, C. Raina MacIntyre
    Emerging Infectious Diseases.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Reemergence of Human Monkeypox and Declining Population Immunity in the Context of Urbanization, Nigeria, 2017–2020
    Phi-Yen Nguyen, Whenayon Simeon Ajisegiri, Valentina Costantino, Abrar A. Chughtai, C. Raina MacIntyre
    Emerging Infectious Diseases.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Bushmeat, wet markets, and the risks of pandemics: Exploring the nexus through systematic review of scientific disclosures
    Colin Scott Peros, Rajarshi Dasgupta, Pankaj Kumar, Brian Alan Johnson
    Environmental Science & Policy.2021; 124: 1.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of the Level of Awareness about the Transmission of Echinococcosis and Toxocariasis between Pet Owners and Non-Pet Owners in Greece
    Christina Kantarakia, Maria E. Tsoumani, Antonis Galanos, Alexander G. Mathioudakis, Eleni Giannoulaki, Apostolos Beloukas, Chrysa Voyiatzaki
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(15): 5292.     CrossRef
Review
Zika: what we do and do not know based on the experiences of Brazil
Cristina Possas
Epidemiol Health. 2016;38:e2016023.   Published online May 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2016023
  • 19,070 View
  • 381 Download
  • 18 Web of Science
  • 22 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Zika virus, which was first discovered in 1947, has become a global threat to human health as it is rapidly spreading through Latin America, the Caribbean, the US and Asia, after causing a large outbreak in the Northeast region of Brazil in 2015. There is ample evidence to support that Zika virus is associated with neurological complications such as microcephaly. The review aims to provide an overview on the complex issues involved in the emergence of Zika virus’s neurological disorders and to discuss possible explanations of Zika virus introduction and dissemination in Brazil. We also suggest national and global strategies to adequately respond to the Zika virus emergence.
METHODS
We provide an analytical evaluation of the main issues related to the Zika outbreak in Brazil, based on available scientific literature, including government documents, and on epidemiological information from national surveillance databases.
RESULTS
The studies on the clinical manifestations of the Zika virus infection coupled with the epidemiological surveillance information in Brazil have provided significant evidence that the Zika virus is associated with neurological disorders such as microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Based on phylogenetic and molecular analysis, the hypothesis regarding the introduction of Zika virus in the country is that it took place following international events in 2013 and 2014, when many foreign visitors could have brought Zika virus into Brazil. The immunologically naïve status of populations in the Americas, previous infection with dengue virus, and the increased activity of Aedes aegypti might be the contributing factors for such an outbreak in Brazil. The Zika virus emergence emphasized the importance of cross-disciplinary perspective. Besides the scientific-based vector control strategies, it is important to understand the nature of the evolutionary processes involved in the viral evolution in complex ecosystems and to have social and anthropological knowledge on the conditions related to the spread of the disease in order to properly respond to the spread of the Zika virus.
CONCLUSIONS
The experiences of Brazil have demonstrated the significance of multi-disciplinary approach in response to new and resurgent arboviral diseases and provided important lessons that could be applied to other developing countries.
Summary

Citations

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  • Exploiting cellulose-based hydrogels for sustainable, intelligent wearables in pandemic preparedness and control
    Kindness A. Uyanga, Wanxin Li, Walid A. Daoud
    European Polymer Journal.2024; 212: 113041.     CrossRef
  • Ações educativas de enfrentamento ao Aedes Aegypti: revisão integrativa
    Ítala Keane Rodrigues Dias, Rosa Maria Grangeiro Martins, Cicera Luciana da Silva Sobreira, Rhavena Maria Gomes Sousa Rocha, Maria do Socorro Vieira Lopes
    Ciência & Saúde Coletiva.2022; 27(1): 231.     CrossRef
  • Survival and Replication of Zika Virus in Diapause Eggs of Aedes Albopictus From Beijing, China
    Qianghui Zhang, Yuting Jiang, Chaojie Li, Jian Gao, Teng Zhao, Hengduan Zhang, Chunxiao Li, Dan Xing, Yande Dong, Tongyan Zhao, Xiaoxia Guo
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Decline in head circumference growth and associated factors in congenital Zika syndrome
    Eliana Harumi Morioka Takahasi, Maria Teresa Seabra Soares de Britto e Alves, Marizélia Rodrigues Costa Ribeiro, Alcione Miranda dos Santos, Marcos Adriano Garcia Campos, Vanda Maria Ferreira Simões, Gláucio Andrade Amaral, Patrícia da Silva Sousa, Demócr
    Cadernos de Saúde Pública.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Entry of dengue virus serotypes and their geographic distribution in Brazilian federative units: a systematic review
    Juliana Maria Trindade Bezerra, Selma Costa de Sousa, Pedro Luiz Tauil, Mariângela Carneiro, David Soeiro Barbosa
    Revista Brasileira de Epidemiologia.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 and Future Disease X in Circular Economy Transition: Redesigning Pandemic Preparedness to Prevent a Global Disaster
    Cristina Possas, Ernesto T. A. Marques, João Baptista Risi, Akira Homma
    Circular Economy and Sustainability.2021; 1(4): 1463.     CrossRef
  • The Politics of Disease Epidemics: a Comparative Analysis of the SARS, Zika, and Ebola Outbreaks
    Lydia Kapiriri, Alison Ross
    Global Social Welfare.2020; 7(1): 33.     CrossRef
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  • Establishment of an Alphavirus-Specific Neutralization Assay to Distinguish Infections with Different Members of the Semliki Forest Complex
    Lisa Henss, Constanze Yue, Joshua Kandler, Helen M. Faddy, Graham Simmons, Marcus Panning, Lia Laura Lewis-Ximenez, Sally A. Baylis, Barbara S. Schnierle
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  • Diagnostic Value of Platelet and Leukocyte Counts in the Differential Diagnosis of Fever in the Returning Traveler
    Elisa Rubio, Izaskun Alejo-Cancho, Cristian Aylagas, Daniel Camprubí, Roser Ferré, Ma Rosa Albarracín, Verónica Gonzalo, Josep Barrachina, Míriam José Álvarez-Martínez, Maria Eugenia Valls, Jordi Mas, Jordi Vila, Irene Losada, Miguel J. Martínez, Climent
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    Atchara Phumee, Rome Buathong, Rungfar Boonserm, Proawpilart Intayot, Nucharat Aungsananta, Akanitt Jittmittraphap, Yutthana Joyjinda, Supaporn Wacharapluesadee, Padet Siriyasatien
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    Sylvie Janssens, Michael Schotsaert, Rahul Karnik, Vinod Balasubramaniam, Marion Dejosez, Alexander Meissner, Adolfo García-Sastre, Thomas P. Zwaka, Jack A. Gilbert
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  • Zika puzzle in Brazil: peculiar conditions of viral introduction and dissemination - A Review
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