Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Author index

Page Path
HOME > Browse articles > Author index
Search
Yue He 1 Article
Association of the dietary inflammatory index with phenotypic age in the United States adults
Mengzi Sun, Jiaxin Fang, Wenhui Gao, Yue He, Yanan Ma, Lina Jin
Epidemiol Health. 2023;45:e2023051.   Published online May 4, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2023051
  • 4,285 View
  • 217 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
One of the underlying mechanisms of aging is chronic inflammation, which has been closely associated with daily diet. Phenotypic age (PhenoAge) has been used as an index to track the aging process before diseases show clinical symptoms. The present study aimed to explore the association between the dietary inflammatory index (DII) and PhenoAge.
METHODS
In total, 9,275 adults aged 20 years old and over in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were involved in this study. Dietary patterns were classified as pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory according to the DII. PhenoAge was regarded as a continuous variable, and linear regression was used to explore its association with dietary inflammation. Stratified analyses by sex, age, race, physical exercise, smoking status, drinking status, and body mass index were used to test the sensitivity of these associations.
RESULTS
The median value of PhenoAge was 38.60 years and 39.76 years for the participants with anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory diets, respectively. A pro-inflammatory diet was positively associated with PhenoAge (β=0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.31 to 1.14), compared with participants who had an anti-inflammatory diet. There was an interaction between dietary inflammation and age for PhenoAge (p<sub>interaction</sub><0.001). The strength of the association between a pro-inflammatory diet and PhenoAge was stronger as age increased.
CONCLUSIONS
A pro-inflammatory diet was associated with a higher PhenoAge, and the association was strongest in the elderly. We recommended reducing dietary inflammation to delay phenotypic aging, especially for the elderly.
Summary
Key Message
One of the underlying mechanisms of aging is chronic inflammation, which has been closely associated with daily diet, and phenotypic age (PhenoAge) has been used as an index to track the aging process before diseases show clinical symptoms. The present study found that a pro-inflammatory diet was associated with a higher PhenoAge, and the association was strongest in the elderly. We recommended reducing dietary inflammation to delay phenotypic aging, especially for the elderly.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The association between methylmalonic acid, a biomarker of mitochondria dysfunction, and phenotypic age acceleration: A population-based study
    Bing Cao, Yu Xue, Dan Liu
    Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics.2024; 117: 105176.     CrossRef
  • Association of pro-inflammatory diet with increased risk of gallstone disease: a cross-sectional study of NHANES January 2017–March 2020
    Jinnian Cheng, Qian Zhuang, Weiyi Wang, Ji Li, Lu Zhou, Ying Xu, Haiqin Zhang, Zixu Zhang, Fengli Zhou, Daming Yang, Yimin Chu, Haixia Peng
    Frontiers in Nutrition.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health