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Amin Doosti-Irani 6 Articles
The global prevalence of dental healthcare needs and unmet dental needs among adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Mahin Ghafari, Samira Bahadivand-Chegini, Tayebeh Nadi, Amin Doosti-Irani
Epidemiol Health. 2019;41:e2019046.   Published online October 27, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2019046
  • 10,224 View
  • 220 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Access to dental healthcare services is a major determinant of dental health in communities. This meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the global prevalence of dental needs and of unmet dental needs in adolescents.
METHODS
PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched in June 2018. The summary measures included the prevalence of met and unmet dental needs. A meta-analysis was performed using the inverse variance method to obtain pooled summary measures. Out of 41,661 retrieved articles, 57 were ultimately included.
RESULTS
The pooled prevalence of orthodontic treatment needs was 46.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 38.0 to 53.0), that of general treatment needs was 59.0% (95% CI, 42.0 to 75.0), that of periodontal treatment needs was 71.0% (95% CI, 46.0 to 96.0), and that of malocclusion treatment needs was 39.0% (95% CI, 28.0 to 50.0). The pooled prevalence of unmet dental needs was 34.0% (95% CI, 27.0 to 40.0).
CONCLUSIONS
The highest and lowest prevalence of unmet dental needs were found in Southeast Asia and Europe, respectively. The prevalence of dental needs was higher in the countries of the Americas and Europe than in other World Health Organization (WHO) regions. The prevalence of unmet dental needs was higher in Southeast Asia and Africa than in other WHO regions.
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  • Use of the sociodental approach in estimating orthodontic treatment needs in adolescent patients
    Wan Nurazreena Wan Hassan, Mohd Zambri Mohamed Makhbul, Zamros Yuzadi Mohd Yusof
    Journal of Orofacial Orthopedics / Fortschritte der Kieferorthopädie.2022; 83(4): 244.     CrossRef
  • Impacts of using orthodontic appliances on the quality of life of children and adolescents: systematic review and meta-analysis
    Maria Tereza Campos Vidigal, Caio Melo Mesquita, Murilo Navarro de Oliveira, Walbert de Andrade Vieira, Cauane Blumenberg, Gustavo G Nascimento, Matheus Melo Pithon, Luiz Renato Paranhos
    European Journal of Orthodontics.2022; 44(4): 359.     CrossRef
  • Minimal Important Difference of the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire Following Orthodontic Treatment: A Cohort Study
    Wan Nurazreena Wan Hassan, Mohd Zambri Mohamed Makhbul, Zamros Yuzadi Mohd Yusof, Siti Adibah Othman
    Children.2022; 9(4): 506.     CrossRef
  • Association between malocclusion in the mixed dentition with breastfeeding and past nonnutritive sucking habits in school-age children
    Glauber S. Belitz, Lara J. N. Furlan, Jessica K. Knorst, Luana C. Berwig, Thiago M. Ardenghi, Vilmar A. Ferrazzo, Mariana Marquezan
    The Angle Orthodontist.2022; 92(5): 669.     CrossRef
  • Changes and determinants of unmet oral health treatment need
    Eeva Torppa‐Saarinen, Mimmi Tolvanen, Satu Lahti, Anna Liisa Suominen
    Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology.2021; 49(2): 158.     CrossRef
Prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection among tuberculosis laboratory workers in Iran
Mahshid Nasehi, Abdolrazagh Hashemi-Shahraki, Amin Doosti-Irani, Saeed Sharafi, Ehsan Mostafavi
Epidemiol Health. 2017;39:e2017002.   Published online December 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2017002
  • 14,930 View
  • 358 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The risk of transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from patients to health care workers (HCWs) is a neglected problem in many countries, including Iran. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI) among TB laboratory staff in Iran, and to elucidate the risk factors associated with LTBI.
METHODS
All TB laboratory staff (689 individuals) employed in the TB laboratories of 50 Iranian universities of medical sciences and a random sample consisting of 317 low-risk HCWs were included in this cross-sectional study. Participants with tuberculin skin test indurations of 10 mm or more were considered to have an LTBI.
RESULTS
The prevalence of LTBI among TB laboratory staff and low-risk HCWs was 24.83% (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.31 to 27.74%) and 14.82% (95% CI, 11.31 to 19.20%), respectively. No active TB cases were found in either group. After adjusting for potential confounders, TB laboratory staff were more likely to have an LTBI than low-risk HCWs (prevalence odds ratio, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.35 to 3.17).
CONCLUSIONS
This study showed that LTBI are an occupational health problem among TB laboratory staff in Iran. This study reinforces the need to design and implement simple, effective, and affordable TB infection control programs in TB laboratories in Iran.
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  • Prevalence and incidence of tuberculosis in health workers: A systematic review of the literature
    Eni Hilário da Silva, Ercilia Lima, Talita Raquel dos Santos, Maria Clara Padoveze
    American Journal of Infection Control.2022; 50(7): 820.     CrossRef
  • Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease in healthcare workers in a tertiary referral hospital in Bandung, Indonesia
    Lika Apriani, Susan McAllister, Katrina Sharples, Isni Nurul Aini, Hanifah Nurhasanah, Rovina Ruslami, Dick Menzies, Philip C Hill, Bachti Alisjahbana
    Journal of Infection Prevention.2022; 23(4): 155.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of modifiable risk factors of tuberculosis and their population attributable fraction in Iran: A cross-sectional study
    Kamal Sadeghi, Jalal Poorolajal, Amin Doosti-Irani, Mohammad Asghari Jafarabadi
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(8): e0271511.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in the Middle East and North Africa: A Systematic Review
    Mazin Barry, Stefano Centanni
    Pulmonary Medicine.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Meta-analysis of latent tuberculosis in healthcare workers in Iran: a retrospective review
    NazaninZahra Sepehri, Seyed Mohammad Saghanezhad, Farshad Khoddami, Amin Arasteh, Marziyeh Delirakbariazar, Azad Khaledi
    Transactions of The Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.2021; 115(9): 965.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection among health workers in Afghanistan: A cross-sectional study
    Ghulam Qader Qader, Mohammad Khaled Seddiq, Khakerah Mohammad Rashidi, Lutfullah Manzoor, Azizullah Hamim, Mir Habibullah Akhgar, Laiqullrahman Rahman, Sean Dryer, Mariah Boyd-Boffa, Aleefia Somji, Muluken Melese, Pedro Guillermo Suarez, Ramesh Kumar
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(6): e0252307.     CrossRef
  • Occupational Tuberculosis Among Laboratory Workers in South Africa: Applying a Surveillance System to Strengthen Prevention and Control
    Jennica Garnett, David Jones, Graham Chin, Jerry M. Spiegel, Annalee Yassi, Nisha Naicker
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(5): 1462.     CrossRef
  • Latent tuberculosis infection in healthcare workers in low- and middle-income countries: an updated systematic review
    Lika Apriani, Susan McAllister, Katrina Sharples, Bachti Alisjahbana, Rovina Ruslami, Philip C. Hill, Dick Menzies
    European Respiratory Journal.2019; 53(4): 1801789.     CrossRef
  • A Study of The Prevalence of Latent Tuberculosis in Household Contacts of Patients with Active Tuberculosis in Kurdistan Region of Iraq: A Brief Report
    Nawfal Hussein, Amer A Balatay , Lokman A Almizori, Hilbeen H Saifullah
    International Journal of Infection.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Is latent tuberculosis infection challenging in Iranian health care workers? A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Mohammad Hossein YektaKooshali, Farahnaz Movahedzadeh, Ali Alavi Foumani, Hoda Sabati, Alireza Jafari, HASNAIN SEYED EHTESHAM
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(10): e0223335.     CrossRef
Occupational risk factors among Iranian farmworkers: a review of the available evidence
Mahin Ghafari, Zahra Cheraghi, Amin Doosti-Irani
Epidemiol Health. 2017;39:e2017027.   Published online July 2, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2017027
  • 11,263 View
  • 243 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
Farming is one of the most important components of most economies. No comprehensive picture exists of the health status of Iranian farmers and the work-related hazards that affect them. We aimed to determine the gaps in the current knowledge regarding the occupational health of Iranian farmworkers. Electronic databases including Medline, Web of Science, Scopus, and Embase, as well as national databases including the Scientific Information Database, MagIran, and Barakat Knowledge System, were searched for articles published through March 2017. All epidemiologic studies regarding the occupational health of farmworkers in Iran were reviewed, regardless of their design, language, time of publication, and location. Of the 86 retrieved articles, 39 studies were ultimately analyzed. Most studies were conducted in Fars, Kerman, and Mazandaran provinces. According to the results of this review, chemical, physical, and biological hazards, along with work-related injuries, may be the main factors threatening the health of farmworkers. The unsafe use of pesticides was related to male infertility, eye and digestive complications, pesticide poisoning, pesticide absorption, hematological changes, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. Chemical hazards (e.g., the unsafe use of pesticides), physical hazards, injuries, and biological hazards (e.g., work-related infectious diseases) threaten the health of Iranian farmworkers. Moreover, farmworkers lack adequate knowledge about the occupational hazards they face and the relevant risk factors.
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  • Characteristics of Grape Shelf Eye Injuries at Vineyards in Japan
    Wataru Kikushima, Yoichi Sakurada, Kenji Kashiwagi
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2022; 11(23): 7079.     CrossRef
  • The Increase in Frequency of Protective Behavior against Pesticide Poisoning in Narail, Bangladesh through Use of an Easy Paper Checklist; an Interventional Study
    Yurie Kobashi, Syed Emdadul Haque, Yoshitaka Nishikawa, Tomohiro Morita, Hiroshi Nagami, Kayako Sakisaka, Sanzida Mubassara, Masaharu Tsubokura
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(17): 9349.     CrossRef
  • A Survey on General Health Status of Paddy Field Workers in Mazandaran Province using the GHQ-28 Questionnaire
    Mohsen Sharifirad, Alireza poursaeed, Farhad Lashgarara, Seyed Mehdi Mirdamadi
    journal of ilam university of medical sciences.2021; 29(3): 72.     CrossRef
Comparison of the tuberculin skin test and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test in detecting latent tuberculosis in health care workers in Iran
Ehsan Mostafavi, Mahshid Nasehi, Abdolrazagh Hashemi Shahraki, Saber Esmaeili, Ebrahim Ghaderi, Saeed Sharafi, Amin Doosti-Irani
Epidemiol Health. 2016;38:e2016032.   Published online July 24, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2016032
  • 12,894 View
  • 212 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The tuberculin skin test (TST) and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test (QFT) are used to identify latent tuberculosis infections (LTBIs). The aim of this study was to determine the agreement between these two tests among health care workers in Iran.
METHODS
This cross-sectional study included 177 tuberculosis (TB) laboratory staff and 67 non-TB staff. TST indurations of 10 mm or more were considered positive. The Student’s t-test and the chi-square test were used to compare the mean score and proportion of variables between the TB laboratory staff and the non-TB laboratory staff. Kappa statistics were used to evaluate the agreement between these tests, and logistic regression was used to assess the risk factors associated with positive results for each test.
RESULTS
The prevalence of LTBIs according to both the QFT and the TST was 17% (95% confidence interval [CI], 12% to 21%) and 16% (95% CI, 11% to 21%), respectively. The agreement between the QFT and the TST was 77.46%, with a kappa of 0.19 (95% CI, 0.04 to 0.34).
CONCLUSIONS
Although the prevalence of LTBI based on the QFT and the TST was not significantly different, the kappa statistic was low between these two tests for the detection of LTBIs.
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  • Meta-analysis of latent tuberculosis in healthcare workers in Iran: a retrospective review
    NazaninZahra Sepehri, Seyed Mohammad Saghanezhad, Farshad Khoddami, Amin Arasteh, Marziyeh Delirakbariazar, Azad Khaledi
    Transactions of The Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.2021; 115(9): 965.     CrossRef
  • Risk of Occupational Latent Tuberculosis Infection among Health Personnel Measured by Interferon-Gamma Release Assays in Low Incidence Countries—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Claudia Peters, Agnessa Kozak, Albert Nienhaus, Anja Schablon
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(2): 581.     CrossRef
  • Latent tuberculosis infection in healthcare workers in low- and middle-income countries: an updated systematic review
    Lika Apriani, Susan McAllister, Katrina Sharples, Bachti Alisjahbana, Rovina Ruslami, Philip C. Hill, Dick Menzies
    European Respiratory Journal.2019; 53(4): 1801789.     CrossRef
  • Latent Tuberculosis Infection among Healthcare Workers in Duhok Province: From Screening to Prophylactic Treatment
    Hind Bahzad Almufty, Ibtesam Salih Abdulrahman, Muayad Aghali Merza
    Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease.2019; 4(2): 85.     CrossRef
  • Is latent tuberculosis infection challenging in Iranian health care workers? A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Mohammad Hossein YektaKooshali, Farahnaz Movahedzadeh, Ali Alavi Foumani, Hoda Sabati, Alireza Jafari, HASNAIN SEYED EHTESHAM
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(10): e0223335.     CrossRef
  • Interferon-gamma release assay for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection: A latent-class analysis
    Tan N. Doan, Damon P. Eisen, Morgan T. Rose, Andrew Slack, Grace Stearnes, Emma S. McBryde, Lei Gao
    PLOS ONE.2017; 12(11): e0188631.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection among tuberculosis laboratory workers in Iran
    Mahshid Nasehi, Abdolrazagh Hashemi-Shahraki, Amin Doosti-Irani, Saeed Sharafi, Ehsan Mostafavi
    Epidemiology and Health.2016; 39: e2017002.     CrossRef
Do the tuberculin skin test and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold in-tube test agree in detecting latent tuberculosis among high-risk contacts? A systematic review and meta-analysis
Erfan Ayubi, Amin Doosti-Irani, Ehsan Mostafavi
Epidemiol Health. 2015;37:e2015043.   Published online October 3, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2015043
  • 15,350 View
  • 201 Download
  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The QuantiFERON-TB Gold in-tube test (QFT-GIT) and the tuberculin skin test (TST) are used to diagnose latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). However, conclusive evidence regarding the agreement of these two tests among high risk contacts is lacking. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to estimate the agreement between the TST and the QFT-GIT using kappa statistics.
METHODS
According to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses guidelines, scientific databases including PubMed, Scopus, and Ovid were searched using a targeted search strategy to identify relevant studies published as of June 2015. Two researchers reviewed the eligibility of studies and extracted data from them. The pooled kappa estimate was determined using a random effect model. Subgroup analysis, Egger’s test and sensitivity analysis were also performed.
RESULTS
A total of 6,744 articles were retrieved in the initial search, of which 24 studies had data suitable for meta-analysis. The pooled kappa coefficient and prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted kappa were 0.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34 to 0.45) and 0.45 (95% CI, 0.38 to 0.49), respectively. The results of the subgroup analysis found that age group, quality of the study, location, and the TST cutoff point affected heterogeneity for the kappa estimate. No publication bias was found (Begg’s test, p=0.53; Egger’s test, p=0.32).
CONCLUSIONS
The agreement between the QFT-GIT and the TST in diagnosing LTBI among high-risk contacts was found to range from fair to moderate.
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  • A prevalence study in Guadalajara, Mexico, comparing tuberculin skin test and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube
    Arturo Plascencia Hernández, Rodrigo M. González Sánchez, Iván I. Hernández Cañaveral, Antonio Luévanos Velázquez, Pedro A. Martínez Arce, Alexander González Díaz, Manuel Sandoval Díaz, Yaxsier de Armas Rodríguez, Edilberto González Ochoa, Héctor Raúl Pér
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(3): e0264982.     CrossRef
  • Meta-analysis of latent tuberculosis in healthcare workers in Iran: a retrospective review
    NazaninZahra Sepehri, Seyed Mohammad Saghanezhad, Farshad Khoddami, Amin Arasteh, Marziyeh Delirakbariazar, Azad Khaledi
    Transactions of The Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.2021; 115(9): 965.     CrossRef
  • Comparative efficacy and safety of wenxin granule combined with antiarrhythmic drugs for atrial fibrillation
    Shuqing Shi, Yuguang Chu, Qiulei Jia, Yuanhui Hu
    Medicine.2021; 100(3): e24434.     CrossRef
  • Comparative Results of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube and QuantiFERON-TB Gold Plus Assays for Detection of Tuberculosis Infection in Clinical Samples
    Dongju Won, Jung Yong Park, Hyon-Suk Kim, Younhee Park, Geoffrey A. Land
    Journal of Clinical Microbiology.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of interventions for reducing TB incidence in countries with low TB incidence: a systematic review of reviews
    Simon M. Collin, Fatima Wurie, Morris C. Muzyamba, Gerard de Vries, Knut Lönnroth, Giovanni Battista Migliori, Ibrahim Abubakar, Sarah R. Anderson, Dominik Zenner
    European Respiratory Review.2019; 28(152): 180107.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Latent Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection (LTBI) in Saudi Arabia; Population based survey
    Hanan H. Balkhy, Kamel El Beltagy, Aiman El-Saed, Badr Aljasir, Abdulhakeem Althaqafi, Adel F. Alothman, Mohammad Alshalaan, Hamdan Al-Jahdali
    International Journal of Infectious Diseases.2017; 60: 11.     CrossRef
  • Positive Tuberculin Skin Test Among Health Care Workers: Prevalence and Risk Factors in Teaching Hospitals of a Highly Endemic Region for Tuberculosis, Zahedan, Iran
    Masoud Salehi, Batool Sharifi Mood, Maliheh Metanat
    International Journal of Infection.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Author’s Reply to Sani et al.: “Effects of Exercise Training in Hypoxia Versus Normoxia on Vascular Health: Comments on Clinical Importance”—Facing Common Misconceptions Concerning Meta-Analysis in Biomedical Research
    David Montero
    Sports Medicine.2016; 46(11): 1769.     CrossRef
  • Detection of latent tuberculosis infection among migrant farmworkers along the US-Mexico border
    E. Oren, M. H. Fiero, E. Barrett, B. Anderson, M. Nuῆez, F. Gonzalez-Salazar
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
Risk factors for amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulcer in southwest Iran: a matched case-control study
Mohammad Kogani, Mohammad Ali Mansournia, Amin Doosti-Irani, Kourosh Holakouie-Naieni
Epidemiol Health. 2015;37:e2015044.   Published online October 5, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2015044
  • 15,594 View
  • 244 Download
  • 13 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Amputation is a multifactorial complication in diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors associated with amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulcers.
METHODS
This matched case-control study was conducted based on new cases of amputation from March 2012 to November 2014. We selected new cases who had undergone amputation, and the control group was chosen from the cities or areas where the cases resided. Each case was matched with two controls based on the duration of diabetes and location. Conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate the associations between potential risk factors and amputation.
RESULTS
A total of 131 cases were compared with 262 controls. The results of the adjusted model showed that sex (odds ratio [OR], 8.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.68 to 27.91), fewer than two hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) tests per year (OR, 13.97; 95% CI, 4.97 to 39.26), unsuitable shoes (OR, 5.50; 95% CI, 2.20 to 13.77), smoking (OR, 3.44; 95% CI, 1.45 to 8.13), and body mass index (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.41) were associated with amputation in diabetic patients.
CONCLUSIONS
The most important factors associated with amputation were females, irregular monitoring of HbA1c levels, improper footwear, and smoking. Developing educational programs and working to ensure a higher quality of care for diabetic patients are necessary steps to address these issues.
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  • Knowledge and practice of diabetic foot care and the prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers among diabetic patients of selected hospitals in the Volta Region, Ghana
    Lawrence Sena Tuglo, Felix Kwasi Nyande, Percival Delali Agordoh, Eunice Berko Nartey, Zhongqin Pan, Lydia Logosu, Atsu Eyram Dei‐Hlorlewu, Desire Koku Haligah, Linda Osafo, Simon Taful, Minjie Chu
    International Wound Journal.2022; 19(3): 601.     CrossRef
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    Enyew Getaneh Mekonen, Tizita Gebeyehu Demssie
    BMC Endocrine Disorders.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Ana Maria Murillo Salamanca, Alejandra María Alvarado-García
    Revista Cuidarte.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Lawrence Sena Tuglo
    International Wound Journal.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Rodrigo Sousa Macedo, Lucas Sousa Macedo, Marcos Hideyo Sakaki, Rafael Barban Sposeto, Rafael Trevisan Ortiz, Marcos de Andrade Corsato, Alexandre Leme Godoy-Santos, Túlio Diniz Fernandes
    Journal of Wound Care.2021; 30(6): 498.     CrossRef
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    Gurpreet Singh, Shubham Gupta, Arnab Chanda
    Journal of Biomechanics.2021; 127: 110699.     CrossRef
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    Shubham Gupta, Gurpreet Singh, Arnab Chanda
    Biomedical Physics & Engineering Express.2021; 7(6): 065020.     CrossRef
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    Yasmine Samir Galal, Walaa Ahmed Khairy, Ahmed Taha, Tarek Tawfik Amin
    Risk Management and Healthcare Policy.2021; Volume 14: 3817.     CrossRef
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    Jianwei Niu, Jing Liu, Yanling Zheng, Linghua Ran, Zhigang Chang
    Human Factors and Ergonomics in Manufacturing & Service Industries.2020; 30(4): 303.     CrossRef
  • Foot care knowledge, attitudes and practices among patients with diabetic foot and amputation in St. Kitts and Nevis
    Gracelyn Hanley, Piao‐Yi Chiou, Chieh‐Yu Liu, Hui‐Mei Chen, Stefani Pfeiffer
    International Wound Journal.2020; 17(5): 1142.     CrossRef
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    Sifiso Mtshali, Ozayr Mahomed, Manal S. Fawzy
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(10): e0240588.     CrossRef
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    Zeinab M. Hassan
    International Journal of Nursing Practice.2017; 23: e12546.     CrossRef
  • Differences in foot self-care and lifestyle between men and women with diabetes mellitus
    Mariana Angela Rossaneis, Maria do Carmo Fernandez Lourenço Haddad, Thaís Aidar de Freitas Mathias, Sonia Silva Marcon
    Revista Latino-Americana de Enfermagem.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health