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Original article Interactions between vitamin B2, the MTRR rs1801394 and MTR rs1805087 genetic polymorphisms, and colorectal cancer risk in a Korean population
Madhawa Gunathilake1orcid , Minji Kim1orcid , Jeonghee Lee1orcid , Jae Hwan Oh2orcid , Hee Jin Chang2orcid , Dae Kyung Sohn2orcid , Aesun Shin3orcid , Jeongseon Kim1orcid
Epidemiol Health 2024;e2024037
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2024037 [Accepted]
Published online: March 11, 2024
1Department of Cancer Biomedical Science, National Cancer Center Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, Korea
2Center for Colorectal Cancer, National Cancer Center Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, Korea
3Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Jongno-gu, Seoul, Korea
Corresponding author:  Jeongseon Kim,
Email: jskim@ncc.re.kr
Received: 14 November 2023   • Revised: 14 February 2024   • Accepted: 18 February 2024
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OBJECTIVES
We explored whether the association between vitamin B2 and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk could be modified by the MTRR rs1801394 and MTR rs1805087 genetic polymorphisms and examined whether the interaction effects are sex-specific.
METHODS
We performed a case‒control study involving 1,420 CRC patients and 2,840 controls from the Korea National Cancer Center. Dietary vitamin B2 intake was assessed using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, and the association with CRC was evaluated. Genotyping was performed using an Illumina MEGA-Expanded Array. For gene-nutrient interaction analysis, pre-matched (1,081 patients and 2,025 controls) and matched (1,081 patients and 1,081 controls) subsets were included. Unconditional and conditional logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
RESULTS
A higher intake of vitamin B2 was associated with a significantly lower CRC risk (OR=0.65; 95% CI, 0.51-0.82; p<0.001). Carriers of at least 1 minor allele of MTRR rs1801394 showed a significantly higher CRC risk (OR=1.43; 95% CI, 1.12-1.83). Men homozygous for the major allele (A) of MTRR rs1801394 and who had a higher intake of vitamin B2 had a significantly lower CRC risk (OR=0.31; 95% CI, 0.18-0.54; p-interaction=0.02). In MTR rs1805087, men homozygous for the major allele (A) and who had a higher vitamin B2 intake had a significantly lower CRC risk (OR=0.38; 95% CI, 0.25-0.60; p-interaction<0.001).
CONCLUSIONS
The MTRR rs1801394 and MTR rs1805087 genetic polymorphisms may modify the association between vitamin B2 and CRC risk, particularly in men. However, further studies are warranted to confirm these interaction results.


Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health