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2 "Salmonella enteritidis"
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Original Articles
An Epidemiologic Investigation on the Mode of Transmission of the Lethal Salmonellosis Outbreak in Hamyang County.
Jang Rak Kim, Sang Won Lee, Hong Bin Kim, Jin Cha, Kwang Hyun Lee, Kang Woo Bae
Korean J Epidemiol. 1999;21(2):185-194.
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Abstract
An outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis epidemic involving about 200 inpatients of gastroenteritis and 1 death occurred among about 750 participants from Hamyang County who attended 4 wedding lunch parties at one buffet restaurant on April 25, 1999. There were also many patients including 1 death among about 500 participants outside Hamyang County who attended same parties. Person to person interviews made to 155 inpatients revealed that distribution of incubation periods was between 1 to 34 hours with median time, 13-14 hours. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to investigate the mode of transmission. Telephone interviews were made to party participants (except 61 inpatients who already had been interviewed personally) on symptoms and on which they had eaten among 40 served foods including water at the parties and data among 288 persons were available for the analyses. One hundred and ninety one interviewees had more than two symptoms among symptoms of diarrhea(more than 3 times), abdominal pain, and fever, which gave an attack rate of 66.3%(191/288). The relative short incubation period and high attack rate suggested the presence of higher infecting dose in this epidemic. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the probable infective foods were boiled cockle, gamju, boiled midodok, fried rices, eomook, and boiled pig's trotter. Salmonella enteritidis were identified in the specimens of boiled cockle, cooked beef, and uncooked beef. Only boiled cockle was both an epidemiological and microbiological infective food. There might be cross-contaminations between several served foods, which meant presence of many contaminated foods by Salmonella enteritidis with different stage of their multiplications. Efforts to inspect food service areas and educate foodhandlers in good personal hygiene and proper foodhandling practices should be strengthened to reduce the incidences of salmonellosis in Korea.
Summary
An Epidemiological Survey on a Salmonella enteritidis Outbreak in Kyongju, Korea.
Mee Kyung Kim, Hyun Sul Lim, Cheol Jung, Gyoung Yim Ha
Korean J Epidemiol. 1998;20(2):187-201.
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Abstract
This study was conducted to investigate the cause and magnitude of food poisoning among residents and visitors for a birthday party in a rural area of Kyongju city in september, 1996. The total subjects were 137 persons, 119 residents(53 males, 66 females), including 7 hospitalixed patients and 18 visitors(8 males, 10 females). The investigation consisted of an interview survey, a study on clinical characteristics for the patients hospitalized, bacteriological examinations of the underground water and microbiologic examinations on microbes isolated from the patients. The population at risk was 59 persons(24 males, 35 females). The attack rate was 50.0%(12 cases) for males, 48.6% for females(17 cases). The cases were distributed evenly for all age groups. The attack rates for each party-food and possible fooe groups were not significantly different. Most clinical symptoms were significantly more frequent among cases than non-ases: abdominal pain(73.1%), diarrhea(73.1%), chilliness(69.2%), fever(65.4%), anorexia(61.5%), nausea(53.8%), general weakness(50.0%) and dizziness(50.0%) were the major symptoms among the cases. The admission rate among the cases was 24.1%(1 male, 6 females). In the stool cultures, Salmonella species group D was isolated from 6 persons of 85 examinees. It was identified as Salmonella enteritidis by serological diagnosis. The samples of underground water were assessed Enon-compatible for drinking in 10 wells(83.3%) of this rural area and it was suggested that it could have been contaminated from cattle feces. There were two wells in the party house, one of them was contaminated by bacterias including E. coli. The contaminated water was stored in a water tank located on the rooftop. This water was used for dish washing and cooking. Wd concluded that the cause of this epidemic was the underground water contaminated by Salmonella enteritidis from guman carriers or domestic animal carriers.
Summary

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health