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6 "Hamid Soori"
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Original Articles
Impact of secondhand smoke exposure in former smokers on their subsequent risk of coronary heart disease: evidence from the population-based cohort of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study
Masoumeh Sadeghi, Maryam S. Daneshpour, Soheila Khodakarim, Amir Abbas Momenan, Mahdi Akbarzadeh, Hamid Soori
Epidemiol Health. 2020;42:e2020009.   Published online March 8, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2020009
  • 12,906 View
  • 154 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Cigarette smoking is an established, strong, and modifiable risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). However, little research has investigated CHD risk in former smokers who continue to be exposed to others’ cigarette smoke (former & secondhand smokers).
METHODS
In the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study, a prospective population-based cohort (n=20,069) was followed up for a median period of 14.6 years. A subset of 8,050 participants of 30 years of age and older was analyzed, with first CHD events as the study outcome. Participants were categorized as never, former, current, secondhand, and former & secondhand smokers. Data on smoking intensity (cigarette/d) were also collected. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was applied to estimate the risk of CHD, taking into account the main potential confounders.
RESULTS
The mean age of participants was 46.10 ±11.38 years, and they experienced 1,118 first CHD events (with most CHD cases in former smokers) during the follow-up period. The risk of CHD was highest in current smokers, followed in order by former & secondhand, former, and secondhand smokers (hazard ratio [HR], 1.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.65 to 2.39; HR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15 to 2.08; HR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.72; HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.51, respectively), compared to never smokers. The risk of CHD increased with smoking intensity, which has been proposed as a preferable measure of smoking, indicating a dose-response pattern.
CONCLUSIONS
The elevated risk of CHD in former & secondhand smokers was a noteworthy finding, with possible implications for health policy; however, further research is needed.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Health effects associated with exposure to secondhand smoke: a Burden of Proof study
    Luisa S. Flor, Jason A. Anderson, Noah Ahmad, Aleksandr Aravkin, Sinclair Carr, Xiaochen Dai, Gabriela F. Gil, Simon I. Hay, Matthew J. Malloy, Susan A. McLaughlin, Erin C. Mullany, Christopher J. L. Murray, Erin M. O’Connell, Chukwuma Okereke, Reed J. D.
    Nature Medicine.2024; 30(1): 149.     CrossRef
  • Predictive Value of Cardiovascular Health Score for Health Outcomes in Patients with PCI: Comparison between Life’s Simple 7 and Life’s Essential 8
    Xueqin Gao, Xinrui Ma, Ping Lin, Yini Wang, Zhenjuan Zhao, Rui Zhang, Bo Yu, Yanhua Hao
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2023; 20(4): 3084.     CrossRef
  • A gender specific risk assessment of coronary heart disease based on physical examination data
    Hui Yang, Ya-Mei Luo, Cai-Yi Ma, Tian-Yu Zhang, Tao Zhou, Xiao-Lei Ren, Xiao-Lin He, Ke-Jun Deng, Dan Yan, Hua Tang, Hao Lin
    npj Digital Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The predictive accuracy of coronary heart disease risk prediction models in rural Northwestern China
    Jiangwei Qiu, Zhenqi Chang, Kai Wang, Kexin Chen, Qingan Wang, Jiaxing Zhang, Juan Li, Chan Yang, Yi Zhao, Yuhong Zhang
    Preventive Medicine Reports.2023; 36: 102503.     CrossRef
  • Risk factors for incident cardiovascular events among adults in low- and middle-income countries: A systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies
    Mulugeta Molla Birhanu, Sojib Bin Zaman, Amanda G. Thrift, Roger G. Evans, Ayse Zengin
    Preventive Medicine.2022; 158: 107036.     CrossRef
  • Burden of current and past smoking across 28 European countries in 2017: A cross-sectional analysis
    Ayaka Teshima, Anthony Laverty, Filippos Filippidis
    Tobacco Induced Diseases.2022; 20(June): 1.     CrossRef
  • Role of Air Pollution and rs10830963 Polymorphism on the Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes: Tehran Cardiometabolic Genetic Study
    Fatemeh Jabbari, Anoushiravan Mohseni Bandpei, Maryam S. Daneshpour, Abbas Shahsavani, Seyed Saeed Hashemi Nazari, Hassanali Faraji Sabokbar, Amir abbas Momenan, Fereidoun Azizi
    Journal of Diabetes Research.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
Associations between dietary risk factors and ischemic stroke: a comparison of regression methods using data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis
Seyed Saeed Hashemi Nazari, Yaser Mokhayeri, Mohammad Ali Mansournia, Soheila Khodakarim, Hamid Soori
Epidemiol Health. 2018;40:e2018021.   Published online May 21, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2018021
  • 12,859 View
  • 264 Download
  • 11 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
We analyzed dietary patterns using reduced rank regression (RRR), and assessed how well the scores extracted by RRR predicted stroke in comparison to the scores produced by partial least squares and principal component regression models.
METHODS
Dietary data at baseline were used to extract dietary patterns using the 3 methods, along with 4 response variables: body mass index, fibrinogen, interleukin-6, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The analyses were based on 5,468 males and females aged 45-84 years who had no clinical cardiovascular disease, using data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.
RESULTS
The primary factor derived by RRR was positively associated with stroke incidence in both models. The first model was adjusted for sex and race and the second model was adjusted for the variables in model 1 as well as smoking, physical activity, family and sibling history of stroke, the use of any lipid-lowering medication, the use of any anti-hypertensive medication, hypertension, and history of myocardial infarction (model 1: hazard ratio [HR], 7.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.66 to 33.69; p for trend=0.01; model 2: HR, 6.83; 95% CI, 1.51 to 30.87 for quintile 5 compared with the reference category; p for trend=0.02).
CONCLUSIONS
Based primarily on RRR, we identified that a dietary pattern high in fats and oils, poultry, non-diet soda, processed meat, tomatoes, legumes, chicken, tuna and egg salad, and fried potatoes and low in dark-yellow and cruciferous vegetables may increase the incidence of ischemic stroke.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparison of data-driven identified hypertension-protective dietary patterns among Chinese adults: based on a nationwide study
    Yuxiang Yang, Wei Piao, Shuya Cai, Kun Huang, Changzheng Yuan, Xue Cheng, Ling Zhang, Yuge Li, Liyun Zhao, Dongmei Yu
    European Journal of Nutrition.2023; 62(7): 2805.     CrossRef
  • Associations between dietary patterns and cardiovascular disease risk in Canadian adults: a comparison of partial least squares, reduced rank regression, and the simplified dietary pattern technique
    Svilena V Lazarova, Mahsa Jessri
    The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.2022; 116(2): 362.     CrossRef
  • Association Between Dietary Quality Indices and Atherosclerosis Risk: A Case-Control Study
    Mahsa Samadani, Anahita Mansoori, Habib Haybar, Fatemeh Haidari, Majid Mohammadshahi
    Nutrition and Metabolic Insights.2022; 15: 117863882211119.     CrossRef
  • Visceral adiposity-related dietary patterns and the risk of cardiovascular disease in Iranian adults: A population-based cohort study
    Nazanin Moslehi, Fatemeh Rahimi Sakak, Maryam Mahdavi, Parvin Mirmiran, Fereidoun Azizi
    Frontiers in Nutrition.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Dietary patterns derived by reduced rank regression and non-communicable disease risk
    Carmen Piernas, Min Gao, Susan A. Jebb
    Proceedings of the Nutrition Society.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Dietary patterns related to cardiovascular disease based on reduced rank regression analysis of healthy middle-aged Koreans: data from the community-based Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES) cohort
    Hye Ah Lee, Hyoin An, EunJin Lee
    The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.2020; 111(6): 1159.     CrossRef
  • Interaction between an ATP-Binding Cassette A1 (ABCA1) Variant and Egg Consumption for the Risk of Ischemic Stroke and Carotid Atherosclerosis: a Family-Based Study in the Chinese Population
    Jing Song, Xia Jiang, Yaying Cao, Juan Juan, Tao Wu, Yonghua Hu
    Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis.2019; 26(9): 835.     CrossRef
Decomposing Gender Disparity in Total Physical Activity among Iranian Adults
Ebrahim Rahimi, Seyed Saeed Hashemi-Nazari, Koorosh Etemad, Hamid Soori
Epidemiol Health. 2017;39:e2017044.   Published online October 16, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2017044
  • 11,866 View
  • 200 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
While gender differences in physical activity (PA) have been reported, their origin is not well understood. The present study aimed to identify factors contributing to this disparity.
METHODS
This was a population-based cross-sectional study based on the 2011 surveillance of risk factors of non-communicable diseases that was conducted among Iranian adults. Multi-staged sampling was performed to obtain the required study sample. The primary outcome was gender differences in the prevalence of sufficient physical activity (SPA). Total physical activity (TPA) was calculated as metabolic equivalents (MET) per minute during a typical week, as recommended by the World Health Organization. On this basis, achieving 600 MET-min/wk or more was defined as SPA. The nonlinear Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition technique was used to explain the disparity.
RESULTS
The predicted gap was 19.50%. About one-third of the gap was due to differences in the level of observable covariates. Among them, work status contributed the most (29.61%). A substantial portion of the gap remained unexplained by such differences, of which about 40.41% was related to unobservable variables. The differential effects of standard of living, ethnicity, and smoking status made the largest contribution, accounting for 37.36, 35.47, and 28.50%, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS
Interventions to reduce the gender gap in PA should focus on increasing TPA among housewives and women with chronic diseases, as well as those with a higher standard of living. In addition, it is essential to explore the impact of ethnicity and smoking status on women’s TPA in order to promote health.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Perioperative Exercise Intention and Influencing Factors: A Multi-Centered Cross-Sectional Study
    Feng Lv, Yuxi Zhang, Su Min, Ping Li, Lihua Peng, Li Ren, Jian Yu, Bin Wang, Yiwei Shen, Shanshan Tong, Juying Jin, Xi Luo, Jing Chen, Yingrui Chen, Yuanyuan Li, Jin Chen, Xing Zeng, Fuquan Luo, Qiuju Xiong, Lei Zou, Yuanyuan Guo, Jun Cao, Qibin Chen, Bin
    Frontiers in Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Health-Related Quality of Life and Physical Activity in a Community Setting
    Marta Gil-Lacruz, Ana Isabel Gil-Lacruz, Paola Domingo-Torrecilla, Miguel Angel Cañete-Lairla
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(14): 7301.     CrossRef
  • A detailed explanation and graphical representation of the Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition method with its application in health inequalities
    Ebrahim Rahimi, Seyed Saeed Hashemi Nazari
    Emerging Themes in Epidemiology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
The association between physical activity and atrial fibrillation applying the Heaviside function in survival analysis: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis
Yaser Mokhayeri, Seyed Saeed Hashemi-Nazari, Mohammad Ali Mansournia, Hamid Soori, Soheila Khodakarim
Epidemiol Health. 2017;39:e2017024.   Published online June 18, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2017024
  • 12,806 View
  • 202 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Although the effect of physical activity (PA) on the incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) has been studied, contradictory results have been reported. Such discrepancies may reflect the different effects of various types of PA upon AF, as well as gender interactions. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the associations of PA types (total, moderate/vigorous, and intentional), as well as walking pace, with AF risk in men and women.
METHODS
Using the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis Typical Week Physical Activity Survey, 3 PA measures and walking pace were calculated among 6,487 men and women aged 45-84 years. The incidence of AF over approximately 11 years of followup was ascertained. The association of each PA measure and walking pace with AF incidence was estimated using multivariable Cox proportional hazard models. An extended Cox model with Heaviside functions (hv) of time was used to estimate the effects of time-varying covariates.
RESULTS
During 11 years of follow-up (49,557 person-years), 242 new AF cases occurred. The incidence rate of AF was 48.83 per 10,000 person-years. The proportional hazard (PH) assumption for total PA among women was not met; hence, we used the hv to calculate the hazard ratio. Total PA in women in the hv2 analysis was negatively associated with AF in all 3 models, although for hv1 no significant association was observed. The PH assumption for walking pace among men was not met, and none of the hv showed a statistically significant association between walking pace and AF in men.
CONCLUSIONS
These results suggest that PA is inversely associated with AF in women.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Weekly physical activity and incident atrial fibrillation in females – A dose-response meta-analysis
    Ioannis Anagnostopoulos, Maria Kousta, Charalampos Kossyvakis, Eleni Lakka, Dimitrios Vrachatis, Spyridon Deftereos, Vassilios P. Vassilikos, Georgios Giannopoulos
    International Journal of Cardiology.2023; 370: 191.     CrossRef
  • Self-Reported Walking Pace and Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases: A Two-Sample Mendelian Randomization Study
    Lu Chen, Xingang Sun, Yuxian He, Liangrong Zheng
    Frontiers in Genetics.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Sex-Specific Exposure–Effect Relationship Between Physical Activity and Incident Atrial Fibrillation in the General Population: A Dose–Response Meta-Analysis of 16 Prospective Studies
    Qin Wan, Yue Zhou, Wengen Zhu, Xiao Liu
    Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Estimation of the population attributable fraction of road-related injuries due to speeding and passing in Iran
Fatemeh Khosravi Shadmani, Hamid Soori, Kamyar Mansori, Manoochehr Karami, Erfan Ayubi, Salman Khazaei
Epidemiol Health. 2016;38:e2016038.   Published online August 29, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2016038
  • 15,436 View
  • 282 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Speeding and passing are considered to be the main human factors resulting in road traffic injuries (RTIs). This study aimed to estimate the population attributeable fraction (PAF) of speeding and passing in RTIs in rural Iran during 2012.
METHODS
The contribution of speeding and passing to RTI-related morbidity and mortality was estimated using the PAF method. The prevalence of speeding and passing was obtained from the national traffic police data registry. A logistic regression model was used to measure the association between the above risk factors and RTIs.
RESULTS
Speeding accounted for 20.96% and 16.61% of rural road-related deaths and injuries, respectively. The corresponding values for passing were 13.50% and 13.44%, respectively. Jointly, the PAF of these factors was 31.63% for road-related deaths and 27.81% for injuries.
CONCLUSIONS
This study illustrates the importance of controlling speeding and passing as a high-priority aspect of public-health approaches to RTIs in Iran. It is recommended that laws restricting speeding and passing be enforced more strictly.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Human Risk Factors for Severity of Injuries in Urban and Suburban Traffic Accidents in Southern Iran: An Insight from Police Data
    Meisam Abolvardi, Nader Sharifi, Karamatollah Rahmanian, Vahid Rahmanian
    International Journal of High Risk Behaviors and Addiction.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of the effect of fixed speed cameras on speeding behavior among Iranian taxi drivers through telematics monitoring
    Hamed Tavolinejad, Mohammad-Reza Malekpour, Nazila Rezaei, Ayyoob Jafari, Naser Ahmadi, Ali Nematollahi, Elham Abdolhamidi, Elmira Foroutan Mehr, Milad Hasan, Farshad Farzadfar
    Traffic Injury Prevention.2021; 22(7): 559.     CrossRef
  • Spousal violence against women and its association with sociodemographic factors and husbands’ controlling behaviour: the findings of Myanmar Demographic and Health Survey (2015–2016)
    Tayzar Tun, Per-Olof Ostergren
    Global Health Action.2020; 13(1): 1844975.     CrossRef
  • Time Series Analysis of Mortalities Resulting from Car Accidents in the Injured Individuals Hospitalized in Shiraz Shahid Rajaee Hospital During 2010 - 2016
    Haleh Ghaem, Mahmoud Hajipour, Hamid Reza Tababataee, Mahnaz Yadollahi, Fatemeh Izanloo
    Trauma Monthly.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
Adjusting for reverse causation to estimate the effect of obesity on mortality after incident heart failure in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study
Maryam Shakiba, Hamid Soori, Mohammad Ali Mansournia, Seyed Saeed Hashemi Nazari, Yahya Salimi
Epidemiol Health. 2016;38:e2016025.   Published online June 4, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2016025
  • 15,761 View
  • 243 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The lower mortality rate of obese patients with heart failure (HF) has been partly attributed to reverse causation bias due to weight loss caused by disease. Using data about weight both before and after HF, this study aimed to adjust for reverse causation and examine the association of obesity both before and after HF with mortality.
METHODS
Using the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, 308 patients with data available from before and after the incidence of HF were included. Pre-morbid and post-morbid obesity were defined based on body mass index measurements at least three months before and after incident HF. The associations of pre-morbid and post-morbid obesity and weight change with survival after HF were evaluated using a Cox proportional hazard model.
RESULTS
Pre-morbid obesity was associated with higher mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04 to 2.49) but post-morbid obesity was associated with increased survival (HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.88). Adjusting for weight change due to disease as a confounder of the obesity-mortality relationship resulted in the absence of any significant associations between post-morbid obesity and mortality.
CONCLUSIONS
This study demonstrated that controlling for reverse causality by adjusting for the confounder of weight change may remove or reverse the protective effect of obesity on mortality among patients with incident HF.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Prevalence and clinical characteristics of diabetic cardiomyopathy in patients with acute heart failure
    Kenichi Matsushita, Kazumasa Harada, Takashi Kohno, Hiroki Nakano, Daisuke Kitano, Junya Matsuda, Makoto Takei, Hideaki Yoshino, Takeshi Yamamoto, Ken Nagao, Morimasa Takayama
    Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases.2024; 34(5): 1325.     CrossRef
  • Impact of body mass index on cardiac adrenergic derangement in heart failure patients: a 123I-mIBG imaging study
    Klara Komici, Leonardo Bencivenga, Stefania Paolillo, Paola Gargiulo, Roberto Formisano, Roberta Assante, Carmela Nappi, Fabio Marsico, Adriana D’Antonio, Giovanni De Simini, Antonio Cittadini, Dino Franco Vitale, Alberto Cuocolo, Pasquale Perrone Filardi
    European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.2020; 47(7): 1713.     CrossRef
  • Impact of prior bariatric surgery on outcomes of hospitalized patients with heart failure: a population-based study
    Hedong Han, Tiantian Zhu, Yibin Guo, Yiming Ruan, Eyal Herzog, Jia He
    Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases.2019; 15(3): 469.     CrossRef
  • Body mass index and all-cause mortality in patients with atrial fibrillation: insights from the China atrial fibrillation registry study
    Lu Wang, Xin Du, Jian-Zeng Dong, Wen-Na Liu, Ying-Chun Zhou, Song-Nan Li, Xue-Yuan Guo, Chen-Xi Jiang, Rong-Hui Yu, Cai-Hua Sang, Ri-Bo Tang, De-Yong Long, Nian Liu, Rong Bai, Laurent Macle, Chang-Sheng Ma
    Clinical Research in Cardiology.2019; 108(12): 1371.     CrossRef
  • The Effects of Reverse Causality and Selective Attrition on the Relationship Between Body Mass Index and Mortality in Postmenopausal Women
    Hailey R Banack, Jennifer W Bea, Jay S Kaufman, Andrew Stokes, Candyce H Kroenke, Marcia L Stefanick, Shirley A Beresford, Chloe E Bird, Lorena Garcia, Robert Wallace, Robert A Wild, Bette Caan, Jean Wactawski-Wende
    American Journal of Epidemiology.2019; 188(10): 1838.     CrossRef

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health