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Ehsan Mostafavi 8 Articles
Prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection among tuberculosis laboratory workers in Iran
Mahshid Nasehi, Abdolrazagh Hashemi-Shahraki, Amin Doosti-Irani, Saeed Sharafi, Ehsan Mostafavi
Epidemiol Health. 2017;39:e2017002.   Published online December 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2017002
  • 14,931 View
  • 358 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The risk of transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from patients to health care workers (HCWs) is a neglected problem in many countries, including Iran. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI) among TB laboratory staff in Iran, and to elucidate the risk factors associated with LTBI.
METHODS
All TB laboratory staff (689 individuals) employed in the TB laboratories of 50 Iranian universities of medical sciences and a random sample consisting of 317 low-risk HCWs were included in this cross-sectional study. Participants with tuberculin skin test indurations of 10 mm or more were considered to have an LTBI.
RESULTS
The prevalence of LTBI among TB laboratory staff and low-risk HCWs was 24.83% (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.31 to 27.74%) and 14.82% (95% CI, 11.31 to 19.20%), respectively. No active TB cases were found in either group. After adjusting for potential confounders, TB laboratory staff were more likely to have an LTBI than low-risk HCWs (prevalence odds ratio, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.35 to 3.17).
CONCLUSIONS
This study showed that LTBI are an occupational health problem among TB laboratory staff in Iran. This study reinforces the need to design and implement simple, effective, and affordable TB infection control programs in TB laboratories in Iran.
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  • Prevalence and incidence of tuberculosis in health workers: A systematic review of the literature
    Eni Hilário da Silva, Ercilia Lima, Talita Raquel dos Santos, Maria Clara Padoveze
    American Journal of Infection Control.2022; 50(7): 820.     CrossRef
  • Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease in healthcare workers in a tertiary referral hospital in Bandung, Indonesia
    Lika Apriani, Susan McAllister, Katrina Sharples, Isni Nurul Aini, Hanifah Nurhasanah, Rovina Ruslami, Dick Menzies, Philip C Hill, Bachti Alisjahbana
    Journal of Infection Prevention.2022; 23(4): 155.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of modifiable risk factors of tuberculosis and their population attributable fraction in Iran: A cross-sectional study
    Kamal Sadeghi, Jalal Poorolajal, Amin Doosti-Irani, Mohammad Asghari Jafarabadi
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(8): e0271511.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in the Middle East and North Africa: A Systematic Review
    Mazin Barry, Stefano Centanni
    Pulmonary Medicine.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Meta-analysis of latent tuberculosis in healthcare workers in Iran: a retrospective review
    NazaninZahra Sepehri, Seyed Mohammad Saghanezhad, Farshad Khoddami, Amin Arasteh, Marziyeh Delirakbariazar, Azad Khaledi
    Transactions of The Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.2021; 115(9): 965.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection among health workers in Afghanistan: A cross-sectional study
    Ghulam Qader Qader, Mohammad Khaled Seddiq, Khakerah Mohammad Rashidi, Lutfullah Manzoor, Azizullah Hamim, Mir Habibullah Akhgar, Laiqullrahman Rahman, Sean Dryer, Mariah Boyd-Boffa, Aleefia Somji, Muluken Melese, Pedro Guillermo Suarez, Ramesh Kumar
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(6): e0252307.     CrossRef
  • Occupational Tuberculosis Among Laboratory Workers in South Africa: Applying a Surveillance System to Strengthen Prevention and Control
    Jennica Garnett, David Jones, Graham Chin, Jerry M. Spiegel, Annalee Yassi, Nisha Naicker
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(5): 1462.     CrossRef
  • Latent tuberculosis infection in healthcare workers in low- and middle-income countries: an updated systematic review
    Lika Apriani, Susan McAllister, Katrina Sharples, Bachti Alisjahbana, Rovina Ruslami, Philip C. Hill, Dick Menzies
    European Respiratory Journal.2019; 53(4): 1801789.     CrossRef
  • A Study of The Prevalence of Latent Tuberculosis in Household Contacts of Patients with Active Tuberculosis in Kurdistan Region of Iraq: A Brief Report
    Nawfal Hussein, Amer A Balatay , Lokman A Almizori, Hilbeen H Saifullah
    International Journal of Infection.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Is latent tuberculosis infection challenging in Iranian health care workers? A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Mohammad Hossein YektaKooshali, Farahnaz Movahedzadeh, Ali Alavi Foumani, Hoda Sabati, Alireza Jafari, HASNAIN SEYED EHTESHAM
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(10): e0223335.     CrossRef
Comparison of the tuberculin skin test and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test in detecting latent tuberculosis in health care workers in Iran
Ehsan Mostafavi, Mahshid Nasehi, Abdolrazagh Hashemi Shahraki, Saber Esmaeili, Ebrahim Ghaderi, Saeed Sharafi, Amin Doosti-Irani
Epidemiol Health. 2016;38:e2016032.   Published online July 24, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2016032
  • 12,896 View
  • 212 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The tuberculin skin test (TST) and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test (QFT) are used to identify latent tuberculosis infections (LTBIs). The aim of this study was to determine the agreement between these two tests among health care workers in Iran.
METHODS
This cross-sectional study included 177 tuberculosis (TB) laboratory staff and 67 non-TB staff. TST indurations of 10 mm or more were considered positive. The Student’s t-test and the chi-square test were used to compare the mean score and proportion of variables between the TB laboratory staff and the non-TB laboratory staff. Kappa statistics were used to evaluate the agreement between these tests, and logistic regression was used to assess the risk factors associated with positive results for each test.
RESULTS
The prevalence of LTBIs according to both the QFT and the TST was 17% (95% confidence interval [CI], 12% to 21%) and 16% (95% CI, 11% to 21%), respectively. The agreement between the QFT and the TST was 77.46%, with a kappa of 0.19 (95% CI, 0.04 to 0.34).
CONCLUSIONS
Although the prevalence of LTBI based on the QFT and the TST was not significantly different, the kappa statistic was low between these two tests for the detection of LTBIs.
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  • Meta-analysis of latent tuberculosis in healthcare workers in Iran: a retrospective review
    NazaninZahra Sepehri, Seyed Mohammad Saghanezhad, Farshad Khoddami, Amin Arasteh, Marziyeh Delirakbariazar, Azad Khaledi
    Transactions of The Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.2021; 115(9): 965.     CrossRef
  • Risk of Occupational Latent Tuberculosis Infection among Health Personnel Measured by Interferon-Gamma Release Assays in Low Incidence Countries—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Claudia Peters, Agnessa Kozak, Albert Nienhaus, Anja Schablon
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(2): 581.     CrossRef
  • Latent tuberculosis infection in healthcare workers in low- and middle-income countries: an updated systematic review
    Lika Apriani, Susan McAllister, Katrina Sharples, Bachti Alisjahbana, Rovina Ruslami, Philip C. Hill, Dick Menzies
    European Respiratory Journal.2019; 53(4): 1801789.     CrossRef
  • Latent Tuberculosis Infection among Healthcare Workers in Duhok Province: From Screening to Prophylactic Treatment
    Hind Bahzad Almufty, Ibtesam Salih Abdulrahman, Muayad Aghali Merza
    Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease.2019; 4(2): 85.     CrossRef
  • Is latent tuberculosis infection challenging in Iranian health care workers? A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Mohammad Hossein YektaKooshali, Farahnaz Movahedzadeh, Ali Alavi Foumani, Hoda Sabati, Alireza Jafari, HASNAIN SEYED EHTESHAM
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(10): e0223335.     CrossRef
  • Interferon-gamma release assay for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection: A latent-class analysis
    Tan N. Doan, Damon P. Eisen, Morgan T. Rose, Andrew Slack, Grace Stearnes, Emma S. McBryde, Lei Gao
    PLOS ONE.2017; 12(11): e0188631.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection among tuberculosis laboratory workers in Iran
    Mahshid Nasehi, Abdolrazagh Hashemi-Shahraki, Amin Doosti-Irani, Saeed Sharafi, Ehsan Mostafavi
    Epidemiology and Health.2016; 39: e2017002.     CrossRef
Plague in Iran: its history and current status
Abdolrazagh Hashemi Shahraki, Elizabeth Carniel, Ehsan Mostafavi
Epidemiol Health. 2016;38:e2016033.   Published online July 24, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2016033
  • 15,935 View
  • 281 Download
  • 21 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Plague remains a public health concern worldwide, particularly in old foci. Multiple epidemics of this disease have been recorded throughout the history of Iran. Despite the long-standing history of human plague in Iran, it remains difficult to obtain an accurate overview of the history and current status of plague in Iran.
METHODS
In this review, available data and reports on cases and outbreaks of human plague in the past and present in Iran and in neighboring countries were collected, and information was compiled regarding when, where, and how many cases occurred.
RESULTS
This paper considers the history of plague in Persia (the predecessor of today’s Iran) and has a brief review of plague in countries in the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region, including a range of countries in the Middle East and North Africa.
CONCLUSIONS
Since Iran has experienced outbreaks of plague for several centuries, neighboring countries have reported the disease in recent years, the disease can be silent for decades, and the circulation of Yersinia pestis has been reported among rodents and dogs in western Iran, more attention should be paid to disease monitoring in areas with previously reported human cases and in high-risk regions with previous epizootic and enzootic activity.
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  • Plagued by a cryptic clock: insight and issues from the global phylogeny of Yersinia pestis
    Katherine Eaton, Leo Featherstone, Sebastian Duchene, Ann G. Carmichael, Nükhet Varlık, G. Brian Golding, Edward C. Holmes, Hendrik N. Poinar
    Communications Biology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Serological evidence of Yersinia pestis infection in rodents and carnivores in Northwestern Iran
    Saber Esmaeili, Parisa Esmaeili, Ahmad Mahmoudi, Ahmad Ghasemi, Ali Mohammadi, Amin Bagheri, Aria Sohrabi, Farshid Rezaei, Hamed Hanifi, Amir Hesam Neamati, Mohammad Mehdi Gouya, Ehsan Mostafavi, Vladimir L. Motin
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2023; 17(1): e0011021.     CrossRef
  • Diversity of bacterial pathogens and their antimicrobial resistance profile among commensal rodents in Qatar
    Md Mazharul Islam, Elmoubashar Farag, Mohammad Mahmudul Hassan, Khalid A. Enan, K. V. Mohammad Sabeel, Maryam Mohammed Alhaddad, Maria K. Smatti, Abdulla Mohammad Al-Marri, Abdul Azia Al-Zeyara, Hamad Al-Romaihi, Hadi M. Yassine, Ali A. Sultan, Devendra B
    Veterinary Research Communications.2022; 46(2): 487.     CrossRef
  • Vector-borne diseases in Iran: epidemiology and key challenges
    Najmeh Parhizgari, Norair Piazak, Ehsan Mostafavi
    Future Microbiology.2021; 16(1): 51.     CrossRef
  • Rodent Ectoparasites in the Middle East: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Md Mazharul Islam, Elmoubashar Farag, Khalid Eltom, Mohammad Mahmudul Hassan, Devendra Bansal, Francis Schaffner, Jolyon M. Medlock, Hamad Al-Romaihi, Zilungile Mkhize-Kwitshana
    Pathogens.2021; 10(2): 139.     CrossRef
  • Modeling COVID-19 in Cape Verde Islands - An application of SIR model
    Adilson da Silva
    Computational and Mathematical Biophysics.2021; 9(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Cross-sectional seasonal prevalence and relative risk of ectoparasitic infestations of rodents in North Sinai, Egypt
    Doaa S. Farid, Nahla H. Sallam, Ahmed M. Salah Eldein, Essam S. Soliman
    Veterinary World.2021; : 2996.     CrossRef
  • El médico (2013): Medicina en la Edad Media
    Emilio Pintor Holguín, Nieves Martínez Alsina, Maria Josefa Gutiérrez Cisneros, Benjamín Herreros Ruiz-Valdepeñas
    Revista de Medicina y Cine.2021; 17(2): 93.     CrossRef
  • Wild Rodents and Their Ectoparasites in an Enzootic Plague Focus, Western Iran
    Ali Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi Sedaghat, Mohammad Reza Abai, Jamshid Darvish, Iraj Mobedi, Ahmad Mahmoudi, Ehsan Mostafavi
    Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases.2020; 20(5): 334.     CrossRef
  • Zoonotic implications of camel diseases in Iran
    Roya Mohammadpour, Mohsen Champour, Fateh Tuteja, Ehsan Mostafavi
    Veterinary Medicine and Science.2020; 6(3): 359.     CrossRef
  • Ancient familial Mediterranean fever mutations in human pyrin and resistance to Yersinia pestis
    Yong Hwan Park, Elaine F. Remmers, Wonyong Lee, Amanda K. Ombrello, Lawton K. Chung, Zhao Shilei, Deborah L. Stone, Maya I. Ivanov, Nicole A. Loeven, Karyl S. Barron, Patrycja Hoffmann, Michele Nehrebecky, Yeliz Z. Akkaya-Ulum, Erdal Sag, Banu Balci-Peyni
    Nature Immunology.2020; 21(8): 857.     CrossRef
  • Spatial modeling, risk mapping, change detection, and outbreak trend analysis of coronavirus (COVID-19) in Iran (days between February 19 and June 14, 2020)
    Hamid Reza Pourghasemi, Soheila Pouyan, Bahram Heidari, Zakariya Farajzadeh, Seyed Rashid Fallah Shamsi, Sedigheh Babaei, Rasoul Khosravi, Mohammad Etemadi, Gholamabbas Ghanbarian, Ahmad Farhadi, Roja Safaeian, Zahra Heidari, Mohammad Hassan Tarazkar, Joh
    International Journal of Infectious Diseases.2020; 98: 90.     CrossRef
  • The Life and Career of Dr. Rasoul Pournaki, Eminent Researcher of Pasteur Institute of Iran
    Roya Mohammadpour, Ehsan Mostafavi
    Journal of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.2020; 8(2): 45.     CrossRef
  • A genomic and historical synthesis of plague in 18th century Eurasia
    Meriam Guellil, Oliver Kersten, Amine Namouchi, Stefania Luciani, Isolina Marota, Caroline A. Arcini, Elisabeth Iregren, Robert A. Lindemann, Gunnar Warfvinge, Lela Bakanidze, Lia Bitadze, Mauro Rubini, Paola Zaio, Monica Zaio, Damiano Neri, N. C. Stenset
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.2020; 117(45): 28328.     CrossRef
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    Md Mazharul Islam, Elmoubashar Farag, Mohammad Mahmudul Hassan, Devendra Bansal, Salah Al Awaidy, Abdinasir Abubakar, Hamad Al-Romaihi, Zilungile Mkhize-Kwitshana
    Animals.2020; 10(12): 2342.     CrossRef
  • Molecular Survey of Tularemia and Plague in Small Mammals From Iran
    Ehsan Mostafavi, Ahmad Ghasemi, Mahdi Rohani, Leila Molaeipoor, Saber Esmaeili, Zeinolabedin Mohammadi, Ahmad Mahmoudi, Mansour Aliabadian, Anders Johansson
    Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Historical Report of Plague Outbreak in Northwestern Iran, 1966
    Roya Mohammadpour, Ehsan Mostafavi
    Journal of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases .2018; 6(1): 20.     CrossRef
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    Monica H. Green
    Afriques.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Mousa khosravani
    Journal of Parasitic Diseases.2018; 42(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • A Field Study of Plague and Tularemia in Rodents, Western Iran
    Ehsan Mostafavi, Abdolrazagh Hashemi Shahraki, Alireza Japoni-Nejad, Saber Esmaeili, Jamshid Darvish, Mohammad Mehdi Sedaghat, Ali Mohammadi, Zeinolabedin Mohammadi, Ahmad Mahmoudi, Behzad Pourhossein, Ahmad Ghasemi, Miklós Gyuranecz, Elisabeth Carniel
    Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases.2017; 17(4): 247.     CrossRef
  • Upsurge of Rodents’ Population in a Rural Area of Northeastern Iran Raised Concerns about Rodent-borne Diseases
    Ahmad Ghasemi, Saber Esmaeili, Abdolrazagh Hashemi Shahraki, Hamed Hanifi, Zeinolabedin Mohammadi, Ahmad Mahmoudi, Mahdi Rohani, Ehsan Mostafavi
    Journal of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases .2017; 5(1): 21.     CrossRef
An epidemiological comparative study on diagnosis of rodent leptospirosis in Mazandaran Province, northern Iran
Behzad Esfandiari, Mohammad Reza Pourshafie, Mohammad Mehdi Gouya, Pejvak Khaki, Ehsan Mostafavi, Jamshid Darvish, Soheila Moradi Bidhendi, Hamed Hanifi, Hossein Nahrevanian
Epidemiol Health. 2015;37:e2015012.   Published online February 23, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2015012
  • 15,678 View
  • 165 Download
  • 11 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Leptospirosis is a zoonosis caused by leptospires, in which transmission occurs through contact with contaminated biological fluids from infected animals. Rodents can act as a source of infection for humans and animals. The disease has a global distribution, mainly in humid, tropical and sub-tropical regions. The aim of this study was to compare culture assays, the microscopic agglutination test (MAT), polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and nested PCR (n-PCR), for the diagnosis of leptospirosis in rodents in Mazandaran Province, northern Iran.
METHODS
One hundred fifty-one rodents were trapped alive at 10 locations, and their urine and kidney samples were collected and used for the isolation of live Leptospira. The infecting serovars were identified and the antibody titres were measured by MAT, using a panel of 20 strains of live Leptospira species as antigens. The presence of leptospiral DNA was evaluated in urine and kidney samples using PCR and n-PCR.
RESULTS
No live leptospires were isolated from the kidney and urine samples of the rodents. Different detection rates of leptospirosis were observed with MAT (21.2%), PCR (11.3%), and n-PCR (3.3%). The dominant strain was Leptospira serjoehardjo (34.4%, p=0.28), although other serotypes were also found. The prevalence of positive leptospirosis tests in rodents was 15.9, 2.6, and 2.6% among Rattus norvegicus, R. rattus, and Apodemus sylvaticus, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS
Leptospirosis was prevalent in rodents in Mazandaran Province, northern Iran. MAT was able to detect leptospires more frequently than culture or PCR. The kidney was a more suitable site for identifying leptospiral DNA by n-PCR than urine. Culture was not found to be an appropriate technique for clinical diagnosis.
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  • Seroepidemiology of leptospirosis in livestock and workers of high-risk occupation in Kurdistan, Iran
    Shadi Aghamohammad, Arian Hajijafari Anaraki, Maryam Rahravani, Mojtaba Rastin, Reza Atashin Sadaf, Meysam Moravedji, Mahdi Rohani
    Comparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.2022; 82: 101758.     CrossRef
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    Elena Harran, Christo Hilan, Zouheira Djelouadji, Florence Ayral
    Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease.2022; 7(10): 260.     CrossRef
  • Rodent Species Diversity and Occurrence of Leishmania in Northeastern Iran
    Seyed Farzad Motevalli-Haghi, Ghorban Mohammad Ozbaki, Nasibeh Hosseini-Vasoukolaei, Seyed Hassan Nikookar, Omid Dehghan, Jamshid Yazdani-Charati, Roohollah Siahsarvie, Reza Dehbandi, Mahmoud Fazeli-Dinan, Ahmadali Enayati
    Polish Journal of Ecology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Zoey May Pheng Soo, Naveed Ahmed Khan, Ruqaiyyah Siddiqui
    Acta Tropica.2020; 201: 105183.     CrossRef
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    Azar Shokri, Sadaf Sabzevari, Seyed Ahmad Hashemi
    Parasite Epidemiology and Control.2020; 9: e00144.     CrossRef
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    Journal of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.2020; 8(3): 98.     CrossRef
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    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2018; 12(4): e0006256.     CrossRef
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    Christiane Denys, François Bonhomme, Boris Kryštufek, Marjan Mashkour, Jean Denis Vigne, Roohollah Siahsarvie
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Tularemia, a re-emerging infectious disease in Iran and neighboring countrie
Afsaneh Zargar, Max Maurin, Ehsan Mostafavi
Epidemiol Health. 2015;37:e2015011.   Published online February 22, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2015011
  • 17,735 View
  • 191 Download
  • 22 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Tularemia is a zoonotic disease transmitted by direct contact with infected animals and through arthropod bites, inhalation of contaminated aerosols, ingestion of contaminated meat or water, and skin contact with any infected material. It is widespread throughout the northern hemisphere, including Iran and its neighbors to the north, northeast, and northwest.
METHODS
In this paper, the epidemiology of tularemia as a re-emerging infectious disease in the world with a focus on Iran and the neighboring countries is reviewed.
RESULTS
In Iran, positive serological tests were first reported in 1973, in wildlife and domestic livestock in the northwestern and southeastern parts of the country. The first human case was reported in 1980 in the southwest of Iran, and recent studies conducted among at-risk populations in the western, southeastern, and southwestern parts of Iran revealed seroprevalences of 14.4, 6.52, and 6%, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS
Several factors may explain the absence of reported tularemia cases in Iran since 1980. Tularemia may be underdiagnosed in Iran because Francisella tularensis subspecies holarctica is likely to be the major etiological agent and usually causes mild to moderately severe disease. Furthermore, tularemia is not a disease extensively studied in the medical educational system in Iran, and empirical therapy may be effective in many cases. Finally, it should be noted that laboratories capable of diagnosing tularemia have only been established in the last few years. Since both recent and older studies have consistently found tularemia antibodies in humans and animals, the surveillance of this disease should receive more attention. In particular, it would be worthwhile for clinical researchers to confirm tularemia cases more often by isolating F. tularensis from infected humans and animals.
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  • The monitoring of Francisella tularensis in surface water of East Azerbaijan province, Iran
    Shadi Aghamohammad, Hossein Ahangari Cohan, Ahmad Ghasemi, Ehsan Mostafavi, Mahdi Rohani
    Comparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.2022; 81: 101744.     CrossRef
  • Five Years of Surveillance for Tularemia Serovar B (Francisella tularensis holarctica) (Olsufjev) (Thiotrichales: Francisellaceae) Including Two Human Cases at an Endemic Site in San Mateo County, California
    Tara M Roth, Arielle Crews, Angie Nakano, Janet Foley
    Journal of Medical Entomology.2022; 59(5): 1787.     CrossRef
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    Derya Karataş Yeni, Fatih Büyük, Asma Ashraf, M. Salah ud Din Shah
    Folia Microbiologica.2021; 66(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Francisella tularensis survey among ranchers and livestock in western Iran
    Hossein Ahangari Cohan, Mahmoud Jamshidian, Mahdi Rohani, Meysam Moravedji, Ehsan Mostafavi
    Comparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.2021; 74: 101598.     CrossRef
  • Francisella tularensis human infections in a village of northwest Iran
    Saber Esmaeili, Mahdi Rohani, Ahmad Ghasemi, Mohammad Mehdi Gouya, Simin Khayatzadeh, Ahmad Mahmoudi, Hossein Ahangari Cohan, Anders Johansson, Max Maurin, Ehsan Mostafavi
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Stephen J. Kassinger, Monique L. van Hoek
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Parisa Soltan-Alinejad, Aboozar Soltani
    Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease.2021; 43: 102108.     CrossRef
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    Fareed Ahmad, Amjad Farooq, Muhammad Usman Ghani Khan, Muhammad Zubair Shabbir, Masood Rabbani, Irshad Hussain
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    Ali Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi Sedaghat, Mohammad Reza Abai, Jamshid Darvish, Iraj Mobedi, Ahmad Mahmoudi, Ehsan Mostafavi
    Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases.2020; 20(5): 334.     CrossRef
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    Zakaria Abdellahoum, Max Maurin, Idir Bitam
    Microorganisms.2020; 9(1): 26.     CrossRef
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    Vahid Kazemi-Moghaddam, Rouhullah Dehghani, Mostafa Hadei, Samaneh Dehqan, Mohammad Mehdi Sedaghat, Milad Latifi, Shamim Alavi-Moghaddam
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    BMC Infectious Diseases.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Comparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.2019; 66: 101322.     CrossRef
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    Journal of Parasitic Diseases.2018; 42(1): 1.     CrossRef
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    Ehsan Mostafavi, Ahmad Ghasemi, Mahdi Rohani, Leila Molaeipoor, Saber Esmaeili, Zeinolabedin Mohammadi, Ahmad Mahmoudi, Mansour Aliabadian, Anders Johansson
    Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Field Study of Plague and Tularemia in Rodents, Western Iran
    Ehsan Mostafavi, Abdolrazagh Hashemi Shahraki, Alireza Japoni-Nejad, Saber Esmaeili, Jamshid Darvish, Mohammad Mehdi Sedaghat, Ali Mohammadi, Zeinolabedin Mohammadi, Ahmad Mahmoudi, Behzad Pourhossein, Ahmad Ghasemi, Miklós Gyuranecz, Elisabeth Carniel
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    Reza Ranjbar, Payam Behzadi, Caterina Mammina
    The Open Microbiology Journal.2016; 10(1): 176.     CrossRef
Major infectious diseases affecting the Afghan immigrant population of Iran: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Behzad Pourhossein, Amin Doosti Irani, Ehsan Mostafavi
Epidemiol Health. 2015;37:e2015002.   Published online January 7, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2015002
  • 17,665 View
  • 211 Download
  • 18 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
As Afghans make up the largest group of foreign nationals in Iran, the aim of this study was to assess the proportion of Afghan immigrants among those afflicted by the most prevalent infectious diseases in Iran.
METHODS
National and international online scientific databases were searched through November 2013. The reference lists of included studies were also searched. All descriptive studies concerning the most common infectious diseases in Iran, including tuberculosis, multiple-drug-resistant tuberculosis, malaria, cholera, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, leishmaniasis, and hepatitis B were retrieved. The nationality of patients was not considered. The selection of studies and data extraction was performed separately by two authors. Results were reported using a random effect model with a 95% confidence interval (CI).
RESULTS
The overall proportion of Afghan immigrants with the aforementioned infectious diseases was 29% (95% CI, 21 to 37). According to a stratified analysis, the proportion of Afghan immigrants afflicted with tuberculosis was (29%), multiple-drug-resistant tuberculosis (56%), malaria (40%), cholera (8%), Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (25%), leishmaniasis (7%), and hepatitis B (14%).
CONCLUSIONS
It is highly recommended to monitor the health status of the Afghan immigrants when entering Iran, to reduce the spread of communicable diseases, which are viewed as serious in international health regulations.
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  • Health condition of Afghan refugees residing in Iran in comparison to Germany: a systematic review of empirical studies
    Parisa Rahimitabar, Alexander Kraemer, Kayvan Bozorgmehr, Fatemeh Ebrahimi, Amirhossein Takian
    International Journal for Equity in Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Perceived Vulnerability to Disease, Knowledge and Preventive Behavior Related to COVID-19 in Farsi and Arabic Speaking Refugees
    Schahryar Kananian, Samar Al-Sari, Ulrich Stangier
    Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health.2022; 24(5): 1245.     CrossRef
  • Health Status of Afghan Refugees in Europe: Policy and Practice Implications for an Optimised Healthcare
    Michael Matsangos, Laoura Ziaka, Artistomenis K. Exadaktylos, Jolanta Klukowska-Rötzler, Mairi Ziaka
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(15): 9157.     CrossRef
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    Soheila Asali, Abbasali Raz, Habibollah Turki, Ladan Mafakher, Elham Razmjou, Shahram Solaymani-Mohammadi
    Infection, Genetics and Evolution.2021; 89: 104710.     CrossRef
  • Vector-borne diseases in Iran: epidemiology and key challenges
    Najmeh Parhizgari, Norair Piazak, Ehsan Mostafavi
    Future Microbiology.2021; 16(1): 51.     CrossRef
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    Nayyereh Choubdar, Fateh Karimian, Mona Koosha, Jalil Nejati, Mohammad Ali Oshaghi
    Parasites & Vectors.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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  • “It is good, but I can’t afford it …” potential barriers to adequate prenatal care among Afghan women in Iran: a qualitative study in South Tehran
    Omid Dadras, Ziba Taghizade, Fateme Dadras, Leyla Alizade, Seyedahmad Seyedalinaghi, Masako Ono-Kihara, Masahiro Kihara, Takeo Nakayama
    BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Eisa Nazar, Hossein Baghishani, Hassan Doosti, Vahid Ghavami, Ehsan Aryan, Mahshid Nasehi, Saeid Sharafi, Habibollah Esmaily, Jamshid Yazdani Charati
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Do the tuberculin skin test and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold in-tube test agree in detecting latent tuberculosis among high-risk contacts? A systematic review and meta-analysis
Erfan Ayubi, Amin Doosti-Irani, Ehsan Mostafavi
Epidemiol Health. 2015;37:e2015043.   Published online October 3, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2015043
  • 15,351 View
  • 201 Download
  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The QuantiFERON-TB Gold in-tube test (QFT-GIT) and the tuberculin skin test (TST) are used to diagnose latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). However, conclusive evidence regarding the agreement of these two tests among high risk contacts is lacking. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to estimate the agreement between the TST and the QFT-GIT using kappa statistics.
METHODS
According to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses guidelines, scientific databases including PubMed, Scopus, and Ovid were searched using a targeted search strategy to identify relevant studies published as of June 2015. Two researchers reviewed the eligibility of studies and extracted data from them. The pooled kappa estimate was determined using a random effect model. Subgroup analysis, Egger’s test and sensitivity analysis were also performed.
RESULTS
A total of 6,744 articles were retrieved in the initial search, of which 24 studies had data suitable for meta-analysis. The pooled kappa coefficient and prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted kappa were 0.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34 to 0.45) and 0.45 (95% CI, 0.38 to 0.49), respectively. The results of the subgroup analysis found that age group, quality of the study, location, and the TST cutoff point affected heterogeneity for the kappa estimate. No publication bias was found (Begg’s test, p=0.53; Egger’s test, p=0.32).
CONCLUSIONS
The agreement between the QFT-GIT and the TST in diagnosing LTBI among high-risk contacts was found to range from fair to moderate.
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Tularemia and plague survey in rodents in an earthquake zone in southeastern Iran
Behzad Pourhossein, Saber Esmaeili, Miklós Gyuranecz, Ehsan Mostafavi
Epidemiol Health. 2015;37:e2015050.   Published online November 17, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2015050
  • 11,738 View
  • 118 Download
  • 17 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Earthquakes are one the most common natural disasters that lead to increased mortality and morbidity from transmissible diseases, partially because the rodents displaced by an earthquake can lead to an increased rate of disease transmission. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of plague and tularemia in rodents in the earthquake zones in southeastern Iran.
METHODS
In April 2013, a research team was dispatched to explore the possible presence of diseases in rodents displaced by a recent earthquake magnitude 7.7 around the cities of Khash and Saravan in Sistan and Baluchestan Province. Rodents were trapped near and in the earthquake zone, in a location where an outbreak of tularemia was reported in 2007. Rodent serums were tested for a serological survey using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
RESULTS
In the 13 areas that were studied, nine rodents were caught over a total of 200 trap-days. Fortyeight fleas and 10 ticks were obtained from the rodents. The ticks were from the Hyalomma genus and the fleas were from the Xenopsylla genus. All the trapped rodents were Tatera indica. Serological results were negative for plague, but the serum agglutination test was positive for tularemia in one of the rodents. Tatera indica has never been previously documented to be involved in the transmission of tularemia.
CONCLUSIONS
No evidence of the plague cycle was found in the rodents of the area, but evidence was found of tularemia infection in rodents, as demonstrated by a positive serological test for tularemia in one rodent.
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  • Seroepidemiological study of Q fever, brucellosis and tularemia in butchers and slaughterhouses workers in Lorestan, western of Iran
    Saber Esmaeili, Fahimeh Bagheri Amiri, Hamid Mokhayeri, Mohammad Hassan Kayedi, Max Maurin, Mahdi Rohani, Ehsan Mostafavi
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Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health