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Original Articles
Estimated trends in hospitalizations due to occupational injuries in Korea based on the Korean National Hospital Discharge In-depth Injury Survey (2006-2019)
Seong-Uk Baek, Won-Tae Lee, Min-Seok Kim, Myeong-Hun Lim, Jin-Ha Yoon
Epidemiol Health. 2023;45:e2023042.   Published online April 5, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2023042
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  • 133 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
In recent years, occupational injuries have sparked a huge social and political debate. Thus, in this study, we focused on the characteristics and trends of occupational injuries requiring hospitalization in Korea.
METHODS
The Korea National Hospital Discharge In-depth Injury Survey was designed to estimate the annual number and characteristics of all injury-related hospitalizations in Korea. The annual number of hospitalizations due to occupational injuries and the age-standardized rates (ASRs) were estimated from 2006 to 2019. The annual percentage change (APC) and average annual percentage change (AAPC) of ASRs and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using joinpoint regression. All analyses were stratified by gender.
RESULTS
In men, the APC of the ASRs of all-cause occupational injuries was -3.1% (95% CI, -4.5 to -1.7) in 2006-2015. However, a non-significant upward trend was observed after 2015 (APC, 3.3%; 95% CI, -1.6 to 8.5). In women, the APC of all-cause occupational injuries was -8.6% (95% CI, -12.1 to -5.1) in 2006-2012. However, a non-significant upward trend was observed after 2012 (APC, 2.1%; 95% CI, -0.9 to 5.2). A recent upward trend in stabbing injuries was observed after 2012 (APC, 4.7%; 95% CI, -1.8 to 11.8) in women. A non-significant overall increasing trend was also observed for occupational injuries caused by exposure to extreme temperatures (AAPC, 3.7%; 95% CI, -1.1 to 8.7) in women.
CONCLUSIONS
A recent upward trend in all-cause injury hospitalizations and hospitalizations caused by stabbing injuries was observed. Therefore, active policy interventions are required to prevent occupational injuries.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구는 퇴원환자 심층조사를 사용하여 2006년부터 2019년까지 우리나라에서 발생한 업무상 손상의 추세를 연령표준화발생률을 구함으로써 분석하였다. 남녀 모두에서 2010년대 초반 까지는 발생률이 유의하게 감소하는 추세를 보였지만, 2013-2015년 이후부터는 통계적으로 유의하지 않은 점진적 상승 추세가 관찰되었다. 이러한 연구 결과는 업무상 손상을 예방하기 위해 적극적인 정책적 개입이 필요하다는 것을 시사한다.
Key Message
This study analyzed the trends in work-related injury occurrences in South Korea from 2006 to 2019 based on a nationally representative, repeated cross-sectional dataset. Age-standardized rates were calculated and their annual trend was estimated using a JointPoint regression. While both males and females exhibited a significant decline in occupational injury rates until the early 2010s, a non-significant but gradual upward trend has been observed since 2013-2015. These findings underscore the need for active policy interventions to prevent work.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Factors Affecting Mortality and Distribution of Co-morbidities in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
    Sung-Soo Kim
    Journal of Health Informatics and Statistics.2024; 49(1): 35.     CrossRef
Factors associated with health-related quality of life in a working population in Singapore
Dhiya Mahirah, Charlotte Sauter, Thuan-Quoc Thach, Gerard Dunleavy, Nuraini Nazeha, George I. Christopoulos, Chee Kiong Soh, Josip Car
Epidemiol Health. 2020;42:e2020048.   Published online June 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2020048
  • 13,022 View
  • 231 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
This study aimed to evaluate the determinants of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among workers in Singapore.
METHODS
We analysed data from a cross-sectional study of 464 participants from 4 companies in Singapore. Physical and mental components of HRQoL were assessed using the Short-Form 36 version 2.0 survey. A generalized linear model was used to determine factors associated with the physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores of HRQoL.
RESULTS
The overall mean PCS and MCS scores were mean±standard deviation 51.6±6.7 and 50.2±7.7, respectively. The scores for subscales ranged from 62.7±14.7 for vitality to 83.5±20.0 for role limitation due to emotional problems. Ethnicity, overweight/obesity, and years working at the company were significantly associated with physical HRQoL, and age and stress at work were significantly associated with mental HRQoL. Moreover, sleep quality was significantly associated with both physical and mental HRQoL.
CONCLUSIONS
These findings could help workplaces in planning strategies and initiatives for employees to maintain a worklife balance that encompasses their physical, emotional, and social well-being.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Дослідження показників якості життя, пов’язаної зі здоров’ям, у розрізі трудової діяльності та безробіття (міжнародний досвід)
    Svitlana Indyka, Nataliia Bielikova
    Physical education, sport and health culture in modern society.2023; (3(63)): 12.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of burnout among healthcare professionals in Singapore
    Kok Hian Tan, Boon Leng Lim, Zann Foo, Joo Ying Tang, Mabel Sim, Phong Teck Lee, Kok Yong Fong
    Annals of the Academy of Medicine, Singapore.2022; 51(7): 409.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with Health-Related Quality of Life among Government Employees in Putrajaya, Malaysia
    Muhamad Hasrol Mohd Ashri, Hazizi Abu Saad, Siti Nur’Asyura Adznam
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(5): 2626.     CrossRef
  • Health-related quality of life in a general population sample in Kazakhstan and its sociodemographic and occupational determinants
    Denis Vinnikov, Aizhan Raushanova, Zhanna Romanova, Zhangir Tulekov
    Health and Quality of Life Outcomes.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of Subjective Quality and Quantity of Sleep with Quality of Life among a General Population
    Kentaro Matsui, Takuya Yoshiike, Kentaro Nagao, Tomohiro Utsumi, Ayumi Tsuru, Rei Otsuki, Naoko Ayabe, Megumi Hazumi, Masahiro Suzuki, Kaori Saitoh, Sayaka Aritake-Okada, Yuichi Inoue, Kenichi Kuriyama
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(23): 12835.     CrossRef
Effects of living in the same region as one’s workplace on the total fertility rate of working women in Korea
Yeon-Yong Kim, Hee-Jin Kang, Seongjun Ha, Jong Heon Park
Epidemiol Health. 2019;41:e2019043.   Published online October 9, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2019043
  • 65,535 View
  • 156 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The lowest-low fertility status of Korea has continued for the past 17 years despite governmental efforts to encourage childbirth. As the number of working women has increased, their residence patterns have changed; however, the impact of this factor has yet to be explored. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the effects of residence patterns relative to the workplace on the total fertility rate of working women.
METHODS
Information on eligibility and healthcare utilization was obtained from the National Health Information Database between 2011 and 2015. The study participants were working women aged 15-49 years. We classified their residence relative to their workplace into 3 patterns: same municipality, same province, and different province. The total fertility rate was calculated and logistic regression was performed of childbirth according to residence pattern, adjusting for age, insurance contribution quartile, size of the workplace, year of birth, and province of residence.
RESULTS
The total fertility rates of working women from 2011 to 2015 were 1.091, 1.139, 1.048, 1.073, and 1.103, respectively. The total fertility rate by residence pattern was highest in women residing in the same municipality as their workplace. After adjustment, the odds of childbirth in women from the same municipality and the same province were 21.6% and 16.0% higher than those of women residing in a different province, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS
The total fertility rate was higher among women living near their workplace. Therefore, effective policy measures should be taken to promote the proximity of working women’s workplace and residence.
Summary
Korean summary
이 연구를 통하여 직장과 동일한 시군구에 거주하는 직장 여성의 출산율이 타 시군구 및 타 시도에 거주하는 경우보다 더 높게 나타나는 것을 확인하였다. 기존 인구사회학적 특성 위주의 출산 관련 연구에 비해 이 연구에서는 직장과 거주지의 차이의 영향을 확인하였다는 데 의의가 있다. 저출산 대책에 대한 다양한 정책적 접근이 요구되는 시점에 직장 여성의 출산율을 높이기 위하여 거주지 대책 등이 종합적으로 고려될 수 있음을 시사한다.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • HASTA GÖZÜYLE ANNE DOSTU HASTANE KRİTERLERİ
    Aysun YEŞİLTAŞ, Ş. Didem KAYA, Aydan YÜCELER, Hüseyin GÖRKEMLİ, Gülnur EREN
    Journal of Healthcare Management and Leadership.2023; (1): 1.     CrossRef
  • No One Size Fits All. Women Commercial Farm Employment and Fertility in Ethiopia: A Study of Saudi Star and MERTI Agricultural Development Farms☆
    Chalachew Getahun Desta
    Rural Sociology.2022; 87(3): 1017.     CrossRef
  • Global patterns of breast cancer incidence and mortality: A population‐based cancer registry data analysis from 2000 to 2020
    Shaoyuan Lei, Rongshou Zheng, Siwei Zhang, Shaoming Wang, Ru Chen, Kexin Sun, Hongmei Zeng, Jiachen Zhou, Wenqiang Wei
    Cancer Communications.2021; 41(11): 1183.     CrossRef
  • A Single Pediatric Surgeon Working in a Single Center: Was There a Change in the Pediatric Surgeon's Role Following 25 Years of Service in Suwon City?
    Jeong Hong, Joohyun Sim
    Advances in Pediatric Surgery.2020; 26(1): 1.     CrossRef
Cohort Profile
Health Effects of Underground Workspaces cohort: study design and baseline characteristics
Gerard Dunleavy, Thirunavukkarasu Sathish, Nuraini Nazeha, Michael Soljak, Nanthini Visvalingam, Ram Bajpai, Hui Shan Yap, Adam C. Roberts, Thuan Quoc Thach, André Comiran Tonon, Chee Kiong Soh, Georgios Christopoulos, Kei Long Cheung, Hein de Vries, Josip Car
Epidemiol Health. 2019;41:e2019025.   Published online August 16, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2019025
  • 15,655 View
  • 194 Download
  • 14 Web of Science
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
The development of underground workspaces is a strategic effort towards healthy urban growth in cities with ever-increasing land scarcity. Despite the growth in underground workspaces, there is limited information regarding the impact of this environment on workers’ health. The Health Effects of Underground Workspaces (HEUW) study is a cohort study that was set up to examine the health effects of working in underground workspaces. In this paper, we describe the rationale for the study, study design, data collection, and baseline characteristics of participants. The HEUW study recruited 464 participants at baseline, of whom 424 (91.4%) were followed-up at 3 months and 334 (72.0%) at 12 months from baseline. We used standardized and validated questionnaires to collect information on socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics, medical history, family history of chronic diseases, sleep quality, health-related quality of life, chronotype, psychological distress, occupational factors, and comfort levels with indoor environmental quality parameters. Clinical and anthropometric parameters including blood pressure, spirometry, height, weight, and waist and hip circumference were also measured. Biochemical tests of participants’ blood and urine samples were conducted to measure levels of glucose, lipids, and melatonin. We also conducted objective measurements of individuals’ workplace environment, assessing air quality, light intensity, temperature, thermal comfort, and bacterial and fungal counts. The findings this study will help to identify modifiable lifestyle and environmental parameters that are negatively affecting workers’ health. The findings may be used to guide the development of more health-promoting workspaces that attempt to negate any potential deleterious health effects from working in underground workspaces.
Summary

Citations

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  • Integrated lighting ergonomics: A review on the association between non-visual effects of light and ergonomics in the enclosed cabins
    Zhiming Gou, Bingchen Gou, Wenyi Liao, Yuxue Bao, Yongqi Deng
    Building and Environment.2023; 243: 110616.     CrossRef
  • Effects of fun-seeking and external locus of control on smoking behaviour: a cross-sectional analysis on a cohort of working men in Singapore
    Kar Fye Alvin Lee, Eun Hee Lee, Adam Charles Roberts, Josip Car, Chee Kiong Soh, Georgios Christopoulos
    BMJ Open.2022; 12(10): e061318.     CrossRef
  • A Comparative Study of International and Asian Criteria for Overweight or Obesity at Workplaces in Singapore
    Nuraini Nazeha, Thirunavukkarasu Sathish, Michael Soljak, Gerard Dunleavy, Nanthini Visvalingam, Ushashree Divakar, Ram Chandra Bajpai, Chee Kiong Soh, George Christopoulos, Josip Car
    Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health.2021; 33(4): 404.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of and factors associated with poor sleep quality and short sleep in a working population in Singapore
    Nanthini Visvalingam, Thirunavukkarasu Sathish, Michael Soljak, Ai-Ping Chua, Gerard Dunleavy, Ushashree Divakar, Nuraini Nazeha, Ram Bajpai, Chee Kiong Soh, Kwok Kian Woon, Georgios Christopoulos, Josip Car
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  • Activity Tracker–Based Metrics as Digital Markers of Cardiometabolic Health: Cross-Sectional Study
    Yuri Rykov, Thuan-Quoc Thach, Gerard Dunleavy, Adam Charles Roberts, George Christopoulos, Chee Kiong Soh, Josip Car
    JMIR mHealth and uHealth.2020; 8(1): e16409.     CrossRef
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    Gerard Dunleavy, Ram Bajpai, André Comiran Tonon, Kei Long Cheung, Thuan-Quoc Thach, Yuri Rykov, Chee-Kiong Soh, Hein de Vries, Josip Car, Georgios Christopoulos
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    Vinita Venugopal, Adam Charles Roberts, Kian-Woon Kwok, George I. Christopoulos, Chee-Kiong Soh
    Ergonomics.2020; 63(11): 1337.     CrossRef
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    Ying Su, Adam C. Roberts, Hui Shan Yap, Josip Car, Kian Woon Kwok, Chee-Kiong Soh, George I. Christopoulos
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    Thuan-Quoc Thach, Dhiya Mahirah, Gerard Dunleavy, Nuraini Nazeha, Yichi Zhang, Christina En Hui Tan, Adam Charles Roberts, George Christopoulos, Chee Kiong Soh, Josip Car
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    Gerard Dunleavy, André Comiran Tonon, Ai Ping Chua, Yichi Zhang, Kei Long Cheung, Thuan-Quoc Thach, Yuri Rykov, Chee-Kiong Soh, Georgios Christopoulos, Hein de Vries, Josip Car
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    Thirunavukkarasu Sathish, Gerard Dunleavy, Michael Soljak, Nanthini Visvalingam, Nuraini Nazeha, Ushashree Divakar, Ram Bajpai, Thuan-Quoc Thach, Kei Cheung, Hein Vries, Chee-Kiong Soh, Georgios Christopoulos, Josip Car
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    Dunleavy, Bajpai, Tonon, Chua, Cheung, Soh, Christopoulos, Vries, Car
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2019; 16(23): 4590.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency and Its Associated Work-Related Factors among Indoor Workers in a Multi-Ethnic Southeast Asian Country
    Ushashree Divakar, Thirunavukkarasu Sathish, Michael Soljak, Ram Bajpai, Gerard Dunleavy, Nanthini Visvalingam, Nuraini Nazeha, Chee Kiong Soh, Georgios Christopoulos, Josip Car
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2019; 17(1): 164.     CrossRef
Original Article
The Effect of Work Department, Income and Job Status on the Workplace Injury Rates in One Car Manufacturing Factory.
Mi A Son
Korean J Epidemiol. 2001;23(2):52-63.
  • 4,937 View
  • 12 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
PURPOSE
There has been little research into socio-economic factors and work condition s as risk factors for workplace injuries in Korea. Separating work from social class is difficult as the social division of labour is at the origin of social class (1). The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship of working conditions and socio-economic factors with workplace injury rates.
METHODS
Three year-follow up data sets for workplace injury data analysis for retrospective cohort study were obtained linking the total workforce and workplace injuries between 1995 and 1997. The Proportional Hazards Model (Cox regression) is used to estimate the hazard ratios for workplace injury by different possible risk factors: work department, income, job status, age and tenure.
RESULTS
The press, body and engine departments have higher hazard rates for severe injuries; the press, engine, and supporting departments for lower-back pain; and the assembly line (with wider confidence interval) and supporting departments for Herniated Intervertebral Discs. Lower waged workers have higher rates of workplace injuries, especially for lower-back pain. Workers with low job status have higher rates than foremen or supervisors. Thus, socio-economic factors and work department contribute independently to workplace injury rates.
CONCLUSIONS
Even though this study could not fully investigate the relationship between socio-economic factors and working conditions, the working conditions as well as socioeconomic factors need to be considered as risk factors of workplace injuries in the workplace.
Summary

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health