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Cohort Profile
Cohort profile: Singapore’s nationally representative Retirement and Health Study with 5 waves over 10 years
Reuben Ng, Yi Wen Tan, Kelvin Bryan Tan
Epidemiol Health. 2022;44:e2022030.   Published online February 21, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2022030
  • 7,072 View
  • 258 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Abstract
The Retirement and Health Study (RHS) is Singapore’s largest nationally representative cohort with over 15,000 participants (aged 45-85 years) followed across five timepoints in 10 years (2014-2024). Accounting for sample weights, the sample represents 1.2 million Singaporeans and permanent residents of a total population of 5.5 million. The RHS sought consent to link survey responses to relevant administrative data, enabling the cross-validation of self-reports with national databases. There are 10 sections in the RHS with over 400 questions, 50% of which are on respondents’ physical and mental health, healthcare utilization and insurance; the remaining 50% are about employment history, retirement adequacy, wealth, and household expenditure. The RHS was set up to provide microdata to compliment administrative data for whole-of-government policy making given that Singapore will reach super-aged status by 2026. Sample findings include a need for older adults to balance between immediate financial needs and investments regarding their pension funds. Also, 86% of older adults preferred to transit into partial retirement by reducing workloads. On the health front, existing studies utilising the RHS have revealed latent classes of disabilities, and that intentions to seek employment can mitigate disability developments. Another study reported that physical disability and social isolation was projected to increase, with ethnic disparities in social functioning. Overall, the RHS will be used for evidenced-informed policy agenda setting and evaluation across domains of health, finance, retirement adequacy, social and family development.
Summary
Key Message
The Retirement and Health Study (RHS) is Singapore’s largest nationally representative cohort with over 15,000 participants (aged 45-85 years) followed across five timepoints in 10 years (2014-2024). Sample findings include a need for older adults to balance between immediate financial needs and investments regarding their pension funds. Overall, the RHS will be used for evidenced-informed policy agenda setting and evaluation across domains of health, finance, retirement adequacy, social and family development.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Health District at Queenstown: Catalyst for translational research
    David Michael Allen, Emi Kiyota, John Eu Li Wong
    Annals of the Academy of Medicine, Singapore.2024; 53(4): 264.     CrossRef
  • Not Too Old for TikTok: How Older Adults Are Reframing Aging
    Reuben Ng, Nicole Indran, Barbara J Bowers
    The Gerontologist.2022; 62(8): 1207.     CrossRef
  • A playbook for effective age advocacy on Twitter
    Reuben Ng, Nicole Indran, Luyao Liu
    Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.2022; 70(8): 2363.     CrossRef
  • Ageism on Twitter during the COVID‐19 pandemic
    Reuben Ng, Nicole Indran, Luyao Liu
    Journal of Social Issues.2022; 78(4): 842.     CrossRef
  • Media attention toward COVID-19 across 18 countries: The influence of cultural values and pandemic severity
    Reuben Ng, Yi Wen Tan, Miguel A. Andrade-Navarro
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(12): e0271961.     CrossRef
Original Article
Life and health satisfaction in the adult population of Iran
Rajabali Daroudi, Arash Rashidian, Hojjat Zeraati, Alireza Oliyaeemanesh, Ali Akbari Sari
Epidemiol Health. 2016;38:e2016047.   Published online November 3, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2016047
  • 14,441 View
  • 187 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Increasing interest has emerged in the use of subjective well-being as a development indicator and for the evaluation of public policies. The aim of this study was to assess life and health satisfaction and their determinants in the adult population of Iran.
METHODS
We conducted a survey of a sample of 3,150 adults at least 18 years of age in Tehran, the capital of Iran. The subjects were selected using a stratified random sampling method, and they were interviewed face-to-face at their usual residence by trained interviewers. Life satisfaction was used as a measure of subjective well-being. We used ordinary least square regression models to assess the associations of life and health satisfaction with socio-demographic variables.
RESULTS
On a 0-10 scale, the mean (standard deviation) scores for life and health satisfaction were 6.93 (2.54) and 7.18 (1.97), respectively. The average score for life satisfaction in females was 0.52 points higher than in males. A U-shaped relationship was found between age and life satisfaction, with respondents 35 to 44 years of age having the lowest average level of life satisfaction. Satisfaction with life and health among divorced respondents was significantly lower than among never-married and married participants. The scores for life satisfaction in respondents who rated their health status as poor were 3.83 points lower than in those who rated their health status as excellent.
CONCLUSIONS
The majority of the population of Tehran was satisfied with their life and health. Self-rated health status had the greatest impact on life satisfaction.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Predictors of Life Satisfaction: A Nationwide Investigation in Iran
    Nasim Salehi, Mohsen Joshanloo, Scott Lamont, Dean Whitehead, Tushar Singh
    Health & Social Care in the Community.2024; 2024: 1.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Group Logotherapy Training on Self-Esteem, Communication Skills, and Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) in Older Adults
    Ali Soroush, Arash Ziapour, Jaffar Abbas, Iran Jahanbin, Bahare Andayeshgar, Farideh Moradi, Sahar Najafi, Elham Cheraghpouran
    Ageing International.2022; 47(4): 758.     CrossRef
  • Personal satisfaction: A concept analysis
    Rnda I. Ashgar
    Nursing Forum.2022; 57(3): 446.     CrossRef
  • Life satisfaction and its influencing factors of middle-aged and elderly stroke patients in China: a national cross-sectional survey
    Ying Liu, Jieyu Liu, Shangcheng Zhou, Xingying Xu, Yu Cheng, Ying Yi, Guanyang Zou
    BMJ Open.2022; 12(8): e059663.     CrossRef
  • What Makes Indonesians Satisfied With Their Health? A Multilevel Analysis
    Susanti Susanti, Adi Cilik Pierewan, Kismiantini Kismiantini, Sofjan Aripin
    SAGE Open.2022; 12(3): 215824402211217.     CrossRef
  • Relationships Between Personal Satisfaction, Cardiovascular Disease Risk, and Health Promoting Behavior Among Arab American Middle-Aged Women
    Rnda I. Ashgar
    Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing.2021; 36(3): 273.     CrossRef
  • The U Shape of Happiness Across the Life Course: Expanding the Discussion
    Nancy L. Galambos, Harvey J. Krahn, Matthew D. Johnson, Margie E. Lachman
    Perspectives on Psychological Science.2020; 15(4): 898.     CrossRef
  • Poor quality of life as a predictor of survival among thalassemia patients in Iran
    Shahab Rezaeian
    Epidemiology and Health.2017; 39: e2017013.     CrossRef

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