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Association of group-level segregation with cardiovascular health in older adults: an analysis of data from the Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project
Sung-Ha Lee, Hyeok-Hee Lee, Kiho Sung, Yoosik Youm, Hyeon Chang Kim
Epidemiol Health. 2023;45:e2023041.   Published online April 4, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2023041
  • 6,158 View
  • 192 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The adverse health effects of individual-level social isolation (e.g., perceived loneliness) have been well documented in older adults. However, little is known about the impact of collective-level social isolation on health outcomes. We sought to examine the association of group-level segregation with cardiovascular health (CVH) in older adults.
METHODS
From the prospective Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project database, we identified 528 community-dwelling older adults who were aged ≥60 years or were married to those aged ≥60 years. Participants who belonged to smaller social groups separate from the major social group were defined as group-level-segregated. The CVH score was calculated as the number of ideal non-dietary CVH metrics (0-6), as modified from the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7. Using ordinal logistic regression models, we assessed cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between group-level segregation and CVH.
RESULTS
Of the 528 participants (mean age, 71.7 years; 60.0% female), 108 (20.5%) were segregated at baseline. In the crosssectional analysis, group-level segregation was significantly associated with lower odds of having a higher CVH score at baseline after adjusting for socio-demographic factors and cognitive function (odds ratio [OR], 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.43 to 0.95). Among 274 participants who completed an 8-year follow-up, group-level segregation at baseline was marginally associated with lower odds of having a higher CVH score at 8 years (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.24 to 1.02).
CONCLUSIONS
Group-level segregation was associated with worse CVH. These findings imply that the social network structure of a community may influence its members’ health status.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구는 “한국인의 사회적 삶, 건강과 노화에 대한 조사”(Korean Social Life, Health and Aging Project, KSHAP)에서 측정한 한 지역 내의 사회적 연결망 자료를 이용하여 사회적 분리와 심혈관 건강 사이의 관계를 살펴보았다. 그 결과, 사회적 분리는 비만, 고혈압, 콜레스테롤, 흡연, 음주 신체적 활동 등을 종합한 ‘라이프 심플 7’ 지표와 부정적인 관련성을 보였으며, 8년 후 추적 조사에서도 이 패턴이 유지되었다. 본 연구 결과는 사회적, 집단적 분리 현상이 신체적 건강에도 악영향을 초래할 수 있음을 시사한다.
Key Message
Using the prospective Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (KSHAP) database, we discovered that group-level segregation was significantly associated with worse cardiovascular health (CVH). Also, we observed a tendency for baseline group-level segregation to be linked to worse CVH after an 8-year follow-up period. These findings emphasize the significance of group-level segregation as a potential contributing factor in the health outcomes of older adults.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association of social isolation and loneliness with the risk of hypertension in middle aged and older adults: Findings from a national representative longitudinal survey
    Shiqi Wang, Hao Zhang, Yiling Lou, Qiqi You, Qingqing Jiang, Shiyi Cao
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2024; 349: 577.     CrossRef
Renal hyperfiltration, fatty liver index, and the hazards of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in Finnish men
Mounir Ould Setti, Ari Voutilainen, Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Epidemiol Health. 2021;43:e2021001.   Published online December 24, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2021001
  • 12,819 View
  • 369 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Renal hyperfiltration (RHF) and fatty liver are separately associated with adverse health outcomes. In this study, we investigated the mortality hazard of coexisting RHF and fatty liver.
METHODS
Middle-aged men from the Kuopio Ischaemic Disease Risk Factor Study (n=1,552) were followed up for a median of 29 years. Associations among RHF, fatty liver index (FLI) score, age, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and hypertension status were assessed using logistic regression. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality with respect to RHF and fatty liver.
RESULTS
Of the men, 5% had RHF (n=73), whereas a majority had fatty liver (n=848). RHF was associated specifically with smoking, and fatty liver was associated specifically with overweight. The all-cause mortality hazard was highest (HR, 1.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27 to 3.01) among men with RHF and fatty liver (n=33). Among men with RHF but normal FLI (n=40), the HR of all-cause mortality was 1.67 (95% CI, 1.15 to 2.42). Among men with fatty liver but a normal estimated glomerular filtration rate (n=527), the HR of all-cause mortality was 1.35 (95% CI, 1.09 to 1.66). CVD mortality hazard was associated with RHF, but not fatty liver. We detected no interaction effect between RHF and fatty liver for all-cause (synergy index, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.21 to 2.67) or CVD (synergy index, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.34 to 2.60) mortality.
CONCLUSIONS
RHF and fatty liver are independently associated with all-cause and CVD mortality
Summary
Key Message
Both prevalent, underdiagnosed, and commonly coexisting, renal hyperfiltration and fatty liver are two notable independent risk factors of all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Impact of gout on cardiovascular disease mortality: a meta-analysis
    Jielin Yuan, Zhitao Xie, Bo Pan, Jingchang Zhang
    Zeitschrift für Rheumatologie.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Sex-specific association of body mass index and fatty liver index with prevalence of renal hyperfiltration: a cross sectional study using Japanese health check-up data
    Atsushi Kitazawa, Yoshiharu Fukuda
    BMC Nephrology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Glomerular Hyperfiltration: A Marker of Fibrosis Severity in Metabolic Associated Steatotic Liver Disease in an Adult Population
    Andrea Dalbeni, Marta Garbin, Mirko Zoncapè, Sara Romeo, Filippo Cattazzo, Anna Mantovani, Annalisa Cespiati, Anna Ludovica Fracanzani, Emmanouil Tsochatzis, David Sacerdoti, Alessandro Mantovani, Rosa Lombardi
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2023; 24(21): 15837.     CrossRef
  • Fatty Liver Index Independently Predicts All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis but No Substantial Liver Disease
    Pil Gyu Park, Jung Yoon Pyo, Sung Soo Ahn, Hyun Joon Choi, Jason Jungsik Song, Yong-Beom Park, Ji Hye Huh, Sang-Won Lee
    Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health