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Sei Jin Chang 4 Articles
Distribution and Correlates of Obesity in a Korean Rural People.
Jong Ku Park, Sang Baek Koh, Myung Gun Kang, Jin Baek Kim, Sook Jung Hyun, Ju Hee Hong, Jun Ho Park, Sei Jin Chang
Korean J Epidemiol. 2004;26(2):8-19.
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Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of present study was to assess the distribution and correlates of obesity in a Korean rural people using both body mass index(BMI) and body fat percent.
METHODS
A total of 1,243 participants were recruited using a two-staged stratified sampling. A structured questionnaire was used to ask their sociodemographics (gender, age, marital status, educational background, and etc.) and health-related behaviors (smoking, drinking, and regular exercise etc.). The data of weight-for height, and body fat percent were also collected by physical examination. For the estimation and analysis of correlates of obesity, we used BMI(>or=25kg/m2) and body fat percent(male>or=25%, female>or=30) as a cut-point of obesity. All analyses were stratified to three age groups(>20, 20-39, 40>or=).
RESULTS
The prevalence of obesity in this study was higher than that in previous studies. This study showed that 32.6% (male: 33.7%, female: 31.7%) of participants according to BMI, and 45.6% (male: 43.8%, female: 47.4%) of them according to body fat percent were obese group. Logistic regression analysis showed that, in the criteria of BMI, while obesity was associated with female and low educational background under the age of 40, prevalence of obesity was higher in non smokers over the age of 40. In case of body fat percent crteria, single(unmarried, divorced, separated, widowed) were more likely to be obese in male aged 20 to 39 years. In the group aged 40 years and over, risk of obesity was higher in female than in male.
CONCLUSION
This result suggests that obesity is common in Korean rural areas, especially among adolescents and female aged 40 years or over, and the risk factors for obesity were different by age. It is required that health management program focusing on obesity and its adverse outcomes should be developed in a community setting.
Summary
Korean summary
Key Message
The Effects of Psychosocial Factors in the Stress Process.
Sei Jin Chang
Korean J Epidemiol. 2002;24(2):148-163.
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Abstract
For the past three decades, considerable attentions have been paid to the search for stressors, stress outcomes and stress modifiers that may reduce the impact of exposure to environmental stressors. Especially medical sociologists and psychologists in medical parts, had an intellectual contribution to the development of stress research. They have presented an excellent opportunity to examine how deeply well-being is affected by the socially structured arrangements of people's lives and by the continuous experiences that result from these arrangements. The predominant concern has been with the role of coping resources, especially social support, coping and so on. The majority of studies report modest but significant positive association between life event levels and physical and mental symtomatology. In particular, the importance of considering psychosocial factors that may modify the effects of stressors on the risk factors for diseases or onset of illness has been emphasized increasingly. Clearly, stress is a complex process in which social, psychological and physiological environments simultaneously affect well-being. This study was performed to document the effect of psychosocial factors such social support, coping, personality traits which had been well known as stress modifiers in the stress process.
Summary
Korean summary
Key Message
Correlates of blood pressure during childhood
Jong Ku Park, Bong Suk Cha, Myung Keyn Lee, Gap Jun Yoon, Sei Jin Chang
Korean J Epidemiol. 1989;11(2):232-245.
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Abstract
Blood pressure of 3,833 school children aged 6 to 14 years has been measured in April to June 1989 at Wonju county, Kangwon, Korea. The objectives of this study were to identify the distribution of blood pressure in school children, and the factors related to that. The mean blood pressure increased by age in both sexes but are higher in female. Systolic blood pressure was highest in blood group O and lowest in blood group B. Blood pressures were correlated positively with age, Quetelet index, Kaup index, height, weight, sitting height, arm circumference, triceps skinfold thickness, air temperature, altitude, pulse rate, serum total protein, albumin, globulin, uric aicd, glucose, and triglyceride, and negatively with LDL-cholesterol. Most of the correlation coefficients were higher with systolic blood pressure than with diastolic blood pressure. In multiple regression analysis, 43.6% of the variation in systolic blood pressure was explained with weight, pulse rate, age, arm circumference, height, and triceps skinfold thickness and 32.3% of that in diastolic blood pressure was explained with weight, age, pulse rate, and triceps skinfold thickness.
Summary
Korean summary
Key Message
Factors affecting the blood pressure in children
Jong Ku Park, Myung Keyn Lee, Sei Jin Chang, Bong Suk Cha
Korean J Epidemiol. 1988;10(2):239-245.
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Abstract
Blood pressure of 1,306 school children aged 6 to 12 years has been measured in May to June 1988 at Wonsung county, Kangwon, Korea. The objectives of this study were to identify the distribution of blood pressure in school children, and the factors related to that. The general patterns of distributions of blood pressures were similar to that of other countries. However, the mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure by age were lower than that of U.S. children especially in the younger age groups. There is a progressive rise of blood pressure of approximately 2.0 mmHg systolic pressure and diastolic pressure per year of age for male and 2.4 mmHg systolic and 1.5 mmHg diastolic pressure for female. The older aged, the taller, the weightier, those with higher Kaup index, and females showed the higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures. In multiple regression analysis, 24.2% of the variation in systolic blood pressure was explained with weight, temperature, pulse rate, and measuring time and 16.8% of that in diastolic blood pressure was explained with weight, pulse rate, and age.
Summary
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Key Message

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health