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Pardis Mohammadzadeh 1 Article
Socioeconomic inequalities in metabolic syndrome and its components in a sample of Iranian Kurdish adults
Pardis Mohammadzadeh, Farhad Moradpour, Bijan Nouri, Farideh Mostafavi, Farid Najafi, Ghobad Moradi
Epidemiol Health. 2023;45:e2023083.   Published online September 3, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2023083
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Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The worldwide incidence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) has increased in recent decades. In this study, we investigated the socioeconomic inequalities associated with MetS and its components in a sample of the Iranian Kurdish population.
METHODS
We used data from 3,996 participants, aged 35 years to 70 years, from the baseline phase of the Dehgolan Prospective Cohort Study (February 2018 to March 2019). The concentration index and concentration curve were used to measure inequality and the Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition method was used to examine the contribution of various determinants to the observed socioeconomic inequality in MetS and its components.
RESULTS
The prevalence of MetS was 34.44% (95% confidence interval [CI], 32.97 to 35.93). The prevalence of MetS was 26.18% for those in the highest socioeconomic status (SES), compared with 40.51% for participants in the lowest SES. There was a significant negative concentration index for MetS (C=-0.13; 95% CI, -0.16 to -0.09), indicating a concentration of MetS among participants with a lower SES. The most prevalent component was abdominal obesity (59.14%) with a significant negative concentration index (C=-0.21; 95% CI, -0.25 to -0.18). According to decomposition analysis, age, gender, and education were the highest contributing factors to inequality in MetS and its components.
CONCLUSIONS
This study showed socioeconomic inequality in MetS. People with a low SES were more likely to have MetS. Therefore, policymakers and health managers need to develop appropriate strategies to reduce these inequalities in MetS across age groups, genders, and education levels, especially among women and the elderly.
Summary
Key Message
This study sheds light on the presence of socioeconomic inequalities in metabolic syndrome (MetS) among Iranian Kurds. Lower socioeconomic status (SES) is associated with a higher prevalence of MetS and its components. Addressing these socioeconomic factors is crucial to reduce health inequalities. Recognizing this association helps us understand the social determinants of health and design targeted interventions. Policymakers and health managers should prioritize developing strategies to reduce these inequalities in MetS across different age groups, genders, and educational levels, with a particular focus on vulnerable populations like women and the elderly.

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health