Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Author index

Page Path
HOME > Browse articles > Author index
Search
Erfan Ayubi 6 Articles
Factors associated with in-hospital death in patients with nosocomial infections: a registry-based study using community data in western Iran
Salman Khazaei, Erfan Ayubi, Ensiyeh Jenabi, Saeid Bashirian, Masud Shojaeian, Leili Tapak
Epidemiol Health. 2020;42:e2020037.   Published online June 1, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2020037
  • 14,142 View
  • 271 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
Objectives
Determining the predictors of in-hospital death related to nosocomial infections is an essential part of efforts made in the overall health system to improve the delivery of health care to patients. Therefore, this study investigated the predictors of in-hospital death related to nosocomial infections.
Methods
This registry-based, longitudinal study analyzed data on 8,895 hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) in Hamadan Province, Iran from March 2017 to December 2019. The medical records of all patients who had been admitted to the hospitals were extracted from the Iranian Nosocomial Infections Surveillance Software. The effects of the type and site of infection, as well as age group, on in-hospital death were estimated using univariate and multivariable Cox regression models.
Results
In total, 4,232 (47.8%) patients with HAIs were males, and their mean age was 48.25±26.22 years. In both sexes, most nosocomial infections involved Gram-negative bacteria and the most common site of infection was the urinary tract. Older patients had a higher risk of in-hospital death (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 2.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.38 to 3.69 for males; aHR, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.29 to 4.62 for females). In both sexes, compared with urinary tract infections, an increased risk of in-hospital death was found for ventilator-associated events (VAEs) (by 95% for males and 93% for females) and bloodstream infections (BSIs) (by 67% for males and 82% for females).
Conclusion
We found that VAEs, BSIs, and fungal infections were independently and strongly associated with increased mortality.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Predictors of In-ICU Mortality Among Older Patients with Healthcare-Associated Infection: A Cohort Study
    Fereshteh Rezaie, Farahnaz Mohammadi-Shahboulaghi, Reza Fadayevatan, Mohsen Shati, Gholamreza Ghaedamini Harouni
    Journal of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Barriers to hand hygiene compliance in intensive care units to prevent the spread of healthcare-associated infections
    Gurjeet Singh, Raksha Singh, Ranga Reddy Burri
    MGM Journal of Medical Sciences.2023; 10(4): 667.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Nosocomial Infections During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
    Sima Rafiei, Zahra Nejatifar, Rana Soheylirad, Samira Raoofi, Fatemeh Pashazadeh Kan, Ahmad Ghashghaee
    Journal of Health Reports and Technology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Nosocomial Infections During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
    Sima Rafiei, Zahra Nejatifar, Rana Soheylirad, Samira Raoofi, Fatemeh Pashazadeh Kan, Ahmad Ghashghaee
    Journal of Health Reports and Technology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Impact of COVID-19 Outbreak on Nosocomial Infection Rate: A Case of Iran
    Maryam Jabarpour, Mahlagha Dehghan, Giti Afsharipour, Elham Hajipour Abaee, Parvin Mangolian Shahrbabaki, Mehdi Ahmadinejad, Mahboobeh Maazallahi, Aseer Manilal
    Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Survival rate in patients with ICU-acquired infections and its related factors in Iran’s hospitals
    MEDSKorosh Etemad, Yousef Khani, Seyed-Saeed Hashemi-Nazari, Neda Izadi, Babak Eshrati, Yadollah Mehrabi
    BMC Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Spatial modeling of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Iranian army units during 2014-2017 using a hierarchical Bayesian method and the spatial scan statistic
Erfan Ayubi, Mohammad Barati, Arasb Dabbagh Moghaddam, Ali Reza Khoshdel
Epidemiol Health. 2018;40:e2018032.   Published online July 13, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2018032
  • 13,710 View
  • 265 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
This study aimed to map the incidence of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Iranian army units (IAUs) and to identify possible spatial clusters.
METHODS
This ecological study investigated incident cases of CL between 2014 and 2017. CL data were extracted from the CL registry maintained by the deputy of health of AJA University of Medical Sciences. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of CL was computed with a Besag, York, and Mollié model. The purely spatial scan statistic was employed to detect the most likely highand low-rate clusters and to obtain the observed-to-expected (O/E) ratio for each detected cluster. The statistical significance of the clusters was assessed using the log likelihood ratio (LLR) test and Monte Carlo hypothesis testing.
RESULTS
A total of 1,144 new CL cases occurred in IAUs from 2014 to 2017, with an incidence rate of 260 per 100,000. Isfahan and Khuzestan Provinces were found to have more CL cases than expected in all studied years (SIR>1), while Kermanshah, Kerman, and Fars Provinces were observed to have been high-risk areas in only some years of the study period. The most significant CL cluster was in Kermanshah Province (O/E, 67.88; LLR, 1,200.62; p<0.001), followed by clusters in Isfahan Province (O/E, 6.02; LLR, 513.24; p<0.001) and Khuzestan Province (O/E, 2.35; LLR, 73.71; p<0.001), while low-rate clusters were located in the northeast areas, including Razavi Khorasan, North Khorasan, Semnan, and Golestan Provinces (O/E, 0.03; LLR, 95.11; p<0.001).
CONCLUSIONS
This study identified high-risk areas for CL. These findings have public health implications and should be considered when planning control interventions among IAUs.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • High-risk spatiotemporal patterns of cutaneous leishmaniasis: a nationwide study in Iran from 2011 to 2020
    Neda Firouraghi, Robert Bergquist, Munazza Fatima, Alireza Mohammadi, Davidson H. Hamer, Mohammad Reza Shirzadi, Behzad Kiani
    Infectious Diseases of Poverty.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Spatio-temporal visualisation of cutaneous leishmaniasis in an endemic, urban area in Iran
    Neda Firouraghi, Alireza Mohammadi, Davidson H Hamer, Robert Bergquist, Sayyed Mostafa Mostafavi, Ali Shamsoddini, Amene Raouf-Rahmati, Mahmoud Fakhar, Elham Moghaddas, Behzad Kiani
    Acta Tropica.2022; 225: 106181.     CrossRef
  • Spatial patterning of occupational stress and its related factors in Iranian critical care nurses using a hierarchical Bayesian technique
    Morteza Kazemi, Kiavash Hushmandi, Amir Vahedian-Azimi, Majid Moayyed, Leila Karimi, Mohammad Ali Sheikh Beig Goharrizi, Mahmood Salesi, Karim Parastouei, Mehdi Raei
    Work.2022; 72(4): 1409.     CrossRef
  • Socio-Economic Characteristics of Urban Tuberculosis Areas in Petaling, Selangor: A Current Spatial Exploratory Scenario
    N.N.N Mohd Zaini, A.R. Abdul Rasam, C.B. Ahmad
    IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science.2022; 1067(1): 012041.     CrossRef
  • Cutaneous leishmaniasis based on climate regions in Iran (1998-2021): A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Mehri Rejali, Nadia Mohammadi Dashtaki, Afshin Ebrahimi, Asieh Heidari, MohammadReza Maracy
    Advanced Biomedical Research.2022; 11(1): 120.     CrossRef
  • Molecular Study of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Species among Soldiers with Dermal Ulcers in Zahedan, Iran
    Sina Sekandarpour, Minoo Shaddel, Zahra Sadat Asadi
    Military Caring Sciences.2021; 7(4): 310.     CrossRef
  • Sensitivity of disease cluster detection to spatial scales: an analysis with the spatial scan statistic method
    Meifang Li, Xun Shi, Xia Li, Wenjun Ma, Jianfeng He, Tao Liu
    International Journal of Geographical Information Science.2019; 33(11): 2125.     CrossRef
Geographic distribution of the incidence of colorectal cancer in Iran: a population-based study
Fatemeh Khosravi Shadmani, Erfan Ayubi, Salman Khazaei, Mohadeseh Sani, Shiva Mansouri Hanis, Somayeh Khazaei, Mokhtar Soheylizad, Kamyar Mansori
Epidemiol Health. 2017;39:e2017020.   Published online May 17, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2017020
  • 16,943 View
  • 285 Download
  • 29 Web of Science
  • 26 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the world. The aim of this study was to investigate the provincial distribution of the incidence of CRC across Iran.
METHODS
This epidemiologic study used data from the National Cancer Registry of Iran and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention of the Ministry of Health and Medical Education of Iran. The average annual age-standardized rate (ASR) for the incidence of CRC was calculated for each province.
RESULTS
We found that adenocarcinoma (not otherwise specified) was the most common histological subtype of CRC in males and females, accounting for 81.91 and 81.95% of CRC cases, respectively. Signet ring cell carcinoma was the least prevalent subtype of CRC in males and females and accounted for 1.5 and 0.94% of CRC cases, respectively. In patients aged 45 years or older, there was a steady upward trend in the incidence of CRC, and the highest ASR of CRC incidence among both males and females was in the age group of 80-84 years, with an ASR of 144.69 per 100,000 person-years for males and 119.18 per 100,000 person-years for females. The highest incidence rates of CRC in Iran were found in the central, northern, and western provinces. Provinces in the southeast of Iran had the lowest incidence rates of CRC.
CONCLUSIONS
Wide geographical variation was found in the incidence of CRC across the 31 provinces of Iran. These variations must be considered for prevention and control programs for CRC, as well as for resource allocation purposes.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Determinants of survival and recurrence in patients with stage I colorectal cancer
    Alimohammad Bananzadeh, Mahshid Bahadori, Mohammad Mohammadianpanah, Faramarz Pakravan, Sara Shojaei-Zarghani, Ali Reza Safarpour
    Frontiers in Surgery.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A joinpoint and age–period–cohort analysis of ocular cancer secular trends in Iran from 2004 to 2016
    Mohammad Abolhosseini, Zahra Khorrami, Sare Safi, Mohammad Esmaeil Akbari, Seyed Mohamadmehdi Moshtaghion, Seyed Farzad Mohammadi, Mozhgan Rezaei Kanavi, Saeed Karimi
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Outcome of early versus late ileostomy closure in patients with rectal cancers undergoing low anterior resection: A prospective cohort study
    Alimohammad Bananzade, Maryam Dehghankhalili, Faranak Bahrami, Seyed Mohammad Kazem Tadayon, Fariborz Ghaffarpasand
    Asian Journal of Surgery.2023; 46(10): 4277.     CrossRef
  • Carbohydrate quality indices and colorectal cancer risk: a case-control study
    Masoud Amini Kahrizsangi, Zohreh Ebrahimi, Zainab Shateri, Fatemeh Mansouri, Ali Zangene, Milad Rajabzadeh-Dehkordi, Mehran Nouri, Bahram Rashidkhani
    BMC Cancer.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impacts of some clinicopathodemography and colorectal tissues key cell cycle and mucin stabilizing molecules on the metastasis trend in colorectal cancer patients
    Ali Ghorbani Ranjbary, Jalil Mehrzad, Nasrollah Rahbar, Hesam Dehghani
    Molecular Biology Reports.2023; 50(10): 8589.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of correlation of miR-141 expression changes with common mutations of K-Ras gene and its relationship with prognosis in tumor tissue of colorectal cancer in Iranian patients
    Melika Arkani, Ardeshir Hesampour Mahallati, Maliheh Entezari
    Medical Sciences Journal of Islamic Azad University.2023; 33(3): 230.     CrossRef
  • Serum level and tumor tissue expression of Ribonucleotide-diphosphate Reductase subunit M2 B: a potential biomarker for colorectal cancer
    Naser Mobarra, Hanieh Gholamalizadeh, Kaed A. Abdulhussein, Sara Raji, Fatemeh Taheri Asl, Mobina Sadat Mirvahabi, Mahdi Rafiee, Reza Pakzad
    Molecular Biology Reports.2022; 49(5): 3657.     CrossRef
  • Enhanced anticancer potency with reduced nephrotoxicity of newly synthesized platin-based complexes compared with cisplatin
    Roya Salehi, Selda Abyar, Fatemeh Ramazani, Ali Akbar Khandar, Seyed Abolfazl Hosseini-Yazdi, Jonathan M. White, Mahdi Edalati, Houman Kahroba, Mehdi Talebi
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A systematic review of methods to estimate colorectal cancer incidence using population-based cancer registries
    Norah Alsadhan, Alaa Almaiman, Mar Pujades-Rodriguez, Cathy Brennan, Farag Shuweihdi, Sultana A. Alhurishi, Robert M. West
    BMC Medical Research Methodology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of lymph node adequacy in patients with colorectal cancer: Results from a referral center in Iran
    Hossein Yahyazadeh, Ahmad Rezazadeh Mafi, Marzieh Beheshti, Amin Ghareyazi, Azita Abdollahinejad, Sahel Valadan Tahbaz
    Forum of Clinical Oncology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of lymph node adequacy in patients with colorectal cancer: Results from a referral center in Iran
    Hossein Yahyazadeh, Ahmad Rezazadeh Mafi, Marzieh Beheshti, Amin Ghareyazi, Azita Abdollahinejad, Sahel Valadan Tahbaz
    Forum of Clinical Oncology.2022; 13(1): 9.     CrossRef
  • Diet-dependent acid load and the risk of colorectal cancer and adenoma: a case–control study
    Saeede Jafari Nasab, Pegah Rafiee, Alireza Bahrami, Nasim Rezaeimanesh, Bahram Rashidkhani, Golbon Sohrab, Farah Naja, Ehsan Hejazi, Amir Sadeghi
    Public Health Nutrition.2021; 24(14): 4474.     CrossRef
  • Incidence and Risk Factors of Colorectal Cancer in the Iranian Population: a Systematic Review
    Hossein Mozafar Saadati, Batool Okhovat, Farzad Khodamoradi
    Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer.2021; 52(2): 414.     CrossRef
  • Trends of Colorectal Cancer Epidemiology and Morphology in Tehran Metropolis, Iran from 2006 to 2015
    Mehdi Azizmohammad Looha, Gohar Mohammadi, Mohammad Esmaeil Akbari, Elham Partovipour, Majid Samsami
    International Journal of Cancer Management.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Participation Rate, Risk Factors, and Incidence of Colorectal Cancer in the Screening Program Among the Population Covered by the Health Centers in Arak, Iran
    Pegah Mohaghegh, Farzane Ahmadi, Mahjabin Shiravandi, Javad Nazari
    International Journal of Cancer Management.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A case-control study of Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diets, colorectal cancer and adenomas among Iranian population
    Saeede Jafari Nasab, Matin Ghanavati, Pegah Rafiee, Alireza Bahrami, Nazanin Majidi, Cain C. T. Clark, Amir Sadeghi, Mohammad Houshyari, Ehsan Hejazi
    BMC Cancer.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Association of Fat-Mass-and Obesity-Associated Gene Polymorphism (rs9939609) With Colorectal Cancer: A Case-Control Study
    Maryam Gholamalizadeh, Mohammad Esmail Akbari, Saeid Doaei, Sayed Hossein Davoodi, Bojlul Bahar, Ghasem Azizi Tabesh, Hossein Sadeghi, Melika Razavi Hashemi, Elham Kheyrani, Samira Rastgoo, Azadeh Hajipour, Zahra Aslany, Reza Mirfakhraie, Alireza Mosavi J
    Frontiers in Oncology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Premature mortality of gastrointestinal cancer in Iran: trends and projections 2001–2030
    Fatemeh Khosravi Shadmani, Farshad Farzadfar, Moein Yoosefi, Kamyar Mansori, Reza Khosravi Shadman, Aliakbar Haghdoost
    BMC Cancer.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Measuring inequalities in the selected indicators of National Health Accounts from 2008 to 2016: evidence from Iran
    Mohammad Hossein Mehrolhassani, Vahid Yazdi-Feyzabadi, Marzieh Lashkari
    Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Spatio-temporal analysis of colorectal cancer using a geographic information system in the Iranian military community during the period 2007–2016
    Alireza Khoshdel, M Alimohammadi, M Sepandi, Y Alimohamadi, P Jalali, M Janani
    BMJ Military Health.2020; 166(E): e8.     CrossRef
  • Positive correlation between interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene 86bp VNTR polymorphism and colorectal cancer susceptibility: a case-control study
    Mostafa Ibrahimi, Maryam Moossavi, Ehsan Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, Mahsa Musavi, Milad Mohammadoo-khorasani, Zahra Shahsavari
    Immunologic Research.2019; 67(1): 151.     CrossRef
  • Lymphovascular and Perineural Invasions Are Independently Associated with Advanced Colorectal Carcinoma
    Hossein Yahyazadeh, Ahmad R Mafi, Elham Khatooni, Marzieh Beheshti, Azita Abdollahinejad
    International Journal of Cancer Management.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Prediction of Colorectal Cancer Screening Based on the Extended Parallel Process Model: Moderating the Role of Health Literacy and Cancer-Related Empowerment
    Isaac Rahimian Boogar, Siavash Talepasand, Hassan Norouzi, Sara Mozafari, Sayed Javad Hosseini
    International Journal of Cancer Management.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Synthesis of Cyanoenone-Modified Diterpenoid Analogs as Novel Bmi-1-Mediated Antitumor Agents
    Lian-Fang Yang, Yajing Xing, Jie-Xin Xiao, Jia Xie, Wei Gao, Jiuqing Xie, Li-Ting Wang, Jinhua Wang, Mingyao Liu, Zhengfang Yi, Wen-Wei Qiu
    ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters.2018; 9(11): 1105.     CrossRef
  • Bayesian adjustment for trend of colorectal cancer incidence in misclassified registering across Iranian provinces
    Sajad Shojaee, Nastaran Hajizadeh, Hadis Najafimehr, Luca Busani, Mohamad Amin Pourhoseingholi, Ahmad Reza Baghestani, Maryam Nasserinejad, Sara Ashtari, Mohammad Reza Zali, Hassan Ashktorab
    PLOS ONE.2018; 13(12): e0199273.     CrossRef
  • Prognostic significance of the tumor-stroma ratio in colon carcinoma: a retrospective study
    Özgen Arslan Solmaz
    Archives of Medical Science – Civilization Diseases.2018; 3(1): 190.     CrossRef
Exploring neighborhood inequality in female breast cancer incidence in Tehran using Bayesian spatial models and a spatial scan statistic
Erfan Ayubi, Mohammad Ali Mansournia, Ali Ghanbari Motlagh, Alireza Mosavi-Jarrahi, Ali Hosseini, Kamran Yazdani
Epidemiol Health. 2017;39:e2017021.   Published online May 17, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2017021
  • 15,944 View
  • 229 Download
  • 11 Web of Science
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The aim of this study was to explore the spatial pattern of female breast cancer (BC) incidence at the neighborhood level in Tehran, Iran.
METHODS
The present study included all registered incident cases of female BC from March 2008 to March 2011. The raw standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of BC for each neighborhood was estimated by comparing observed cases relative to expected cases. The estimated raw SIRs were smoothed by a Besag, York, and Mollie spatial model and the spatial empirical Bayesian method. The purely spatial scan statistic was used to identify spatial clusters.
RESULTS
There were 4,175 incident BC cases in the study area from 2008 to 2011, of which 3,080 were successfully geocoded to the neighborhood level. Higher than expected rates of BC were found in neighborhoods located in northern and central Tehran, whereas lower rates appeared in southern areas. The most likely cluster of higher than expected BC incidence involved neighborhoods in districts 3 and 6, with an observed-to-expected ratio of 3.92 (p<0.001), whereas the most likely cluster of lower than expected rates involved neighborhoods in districts 17, 18, and 19, with an observed-to-expected ratio of 0.05 (p<0.001).
CONCLUSIONS
Neighborhood-level inequality in the incidence of BC exists in Tehran. These findings can serve as a basis for resource allocation and preventive strategies in at-risk areas.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Evaluation and comparison of spatial cluster detection methods for improved decision making of disease surveillance: a case study of national dengue surveillance in Thailand
    Chawarat Rotejanaprasert, Kawin Chinpong, Andrew B. Lawson, Peerut Chienwichai, Richard J. Maude
    BMC Medical Research Methodology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clusters of high-risk, low-risk, and temporal trends of breast and cervical cancer-related mortality in São Paulo, Brazil, during 2000–2016
    P.M.M. Bermudi, A.C.G. Pellini, C.S.G. Diniz, A.G. Ribeiro, B.S. de Aguiar, M.A. Failla, F. Chiaravalloti Neto
    Annals of Epidemiology.2023; 78: 61.     CrossRef
  • Variabilidade espacial intraurbana da mortalidade por câncer de mama e do colo do útero no município de São Paulo: análise dos fatores associados
    Breno Souza de Aguiar, Alessandra Cristina Guedes Pellini, Elizabeth Angélica Salinas Rebolledo, Adeylson Guimarães Ribeiro, Carmen Simone Grilo Diniz, Patricia Marques Moralejo Bermudi, Marcelo Antunes Failla, Oswaldo Santos Baquero, Francisco Chiaravall
    Revista Brasileira de Epidemiologia.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Intra-urban spatial variability of breast and cervical cancer mortality in the city of São Paulo: analysis of associated factors
    Breno Souza de Aguiar, Alessandra Cristina Guedes Pellini, Elizabeth Angélica Salinas Rebolledo, Adeylson Guimarães Ribeiro, Carmen Simone Grilo Diniz, Patricia Marques Moralejo Bermudi, Marcelo Antunes Failla, Oswaldo Santos Baquero, Francisco Chiaravall
    Revista Brasileira de Epidemiologia.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Breast cancer incidence in Yogyakarta, Indonesia from 2008–2019: A cross-sectional study using trend analysis and geographical information system
    Bryant Ng, Herindita Puspitaningtyas, Juan Adrian Wiranata, Susanna Hilda Hutajulu, Irianiwati Widodo, Nungki Anggorowati, Guardian Yoki Sanjaya, Lutfan Lazuardi, Patumrat Sripan, Abdulkader Murad
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(7): e0288073.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of the association between centrosome amplification in tumor tissue of breast cancer patients and changes in the expression of CETN1 and CNTROB genes
    Payam Kheirmand Parizi, Leila Mousavi Seresht, Seyed-Alireza Esmaeili, Ali Davarpanah Jazi, Abdolazim Sarli, Farinaz Khosravian, Mansour Salehi
    Gene Reports.2022; 26: 101481.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Religious–Spiritual Psychotherapy on Illness Perception and Inner Strength among Patients with Breast Cancer in Iran
    Safoora Davari, Isaac Rahimian Boogar, Siavash Talepasand, Mohamad Reza Evazi
    Journal of Religion and Health.2022; 61(6): 4302.     CrossRef
  • Geographic disparities in Saskatchewan prostate cancer incidence and its association with physician density: analysis using Bayesian models
    Mustafa Andkhoie, Michael Szafron
    BMC Cancer.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Campania and cancer mortality: An inseparable pair? The role of environmental quality and socio-economic deprivation
    Massimiliano Agovino, Massimiliano Cerciello, Gaetano Musella
    Social Science & Medicine.2021; 287: 114328.     CrossRef
  • The application of spatial empirical Bayesian smoothing method in spatial analysis of bacillary dysentery: A case study in Yudu County, Jiangxi Province
    Yuwei Wang, Wang Gao
    IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science.2020; 568(1): 012009.     CrossRef
  • A Multi-Decadal Spatial Analysis of Demographic Vulnerability to Urban Flood: A Case Study of Birmingham City, USA
    Mohammad Khalid Hossain, Qingmin Meng
    Sustainability.2020; 12(21): 9139.     CrossRef
  • Cancer mortality rates and spillover effects among different areas: A case study in Campania (southern Italy)
    Massimiliano Agovino, Maria Carmela Aprile, Antonio Garofalo, Angela Mariani
    Social Science & Medicine.2018; 204: 67.     CrossRef
  • Spatial modeling of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Iranian army units during 2014-2017 using a hierarchical Bayesian method and the spatial scan statistic
    Erfan Ayubi, Mohammad Barati, Arasb Dabbagh Moghaddam, Ali Reza Khoshdel
    Epidemiology and Health.2018; 40: e2018032.     CrossRef
Estimation of the population attributable fraction of road-related injuries due to speeding and passing in Iran
Fatemeh Khosravi Shadmani, Hamid Soori, Kamyar Mansori, Manoochehr Karami, Erfan Ayubi, Salman Khazaei
Epidemiol Health. 2016;38:e2016038.   Published online August 29, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2016038
  • 16,259 View
  • 283 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Speeding and passing are considered to be the main human factors resulting in road traffic injuries (RTIs). This study aimed to estimate the population attributeable fraction (PAF) of speeding and passing in RTIs in rural Iran during 2012.
METHODS
The contribution of speeding and passing to RTI-related morbidity and mortality was estimated using the PAF method. The prevalence of speeding and passing was obtained from the national traffic police data registry. A logistic regression model was used to measure the association between the above risk factors and RTIs.
RESULTS
Speeding accounted for 20.96% and 16.61% of rural road-related deaths and injuries, respectively. The corresponding values for passing were 13.50% and 13.44%, respectively. Jointly, the PAF of these factors was 31.63% for road-related deaths and 27.81% for injuries.
CONCLUSIONS
This study illustrates the importance of controlling speeding and passing as a high-priority aspect of public-health approaches to RTIs in Iran. It is recommended that laws restricting speeding and passing be enforced more strictly.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Human Risk Factors for Severity of Injuries in Urban and Suburban Traffic Accidents in Southern Iran: An Insight from Police Data
    Meisam Abolvardi, Nader Sharifi, Karamatollah Rahmanian, Vahid Rahmanian
    International Journal of High Risk Behaviors and Addiction.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of the effect of fixed speed cameras on speeding behavior among Iranian taxi drivers through telematics monitoring
    Hamed Tavolinejad, Mohammad-Reza Malekpour, Nazila Rezaei, Ayyoob Jafari, Naser Ahmadi, Ali Nematollahi, Elham Abdolhamidi, Elmira Foroutan Mehr, Milad Hasan, Farshad Farzadfar
    Traffic Injury Prevention.2021; 22(7): 559.     CrossRef
  • Spousal violence against women and its association with sociodemographic factors and husbands’ controlling behaviour: the findings of Myanmar Demographic and Health Survey (2015–2016)
    Tayzar Tun, Per-Olof Ostergren
    Global Health Action.2020; 13(1): 1844975.     CrossRef
  • Time Series Analysis of Mortalities Resulting from Car Accidents in the Injured Individuals Hospitalized in Shiraz Shahid Rajaee Hospital During 2010 - 2016
    Haleh Ghaem, Mahmoud Hajipour, Hamid Reza Tababataee, Mahnaz Yadollahi, Fatemeh Izanloo
    Trauma Monthly.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
Do the tuberculin skin test and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold in-tube test agree in detecting latent tuberculosis among high-risk contacts? A systematic review and meta-analysis
Erfan Ayubi, Amin Doosti-Irani, Ehsan Mostafavi
Epidemiol Health. 2015;37:e2015043.   Published online October 3, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2015043
  • 19,544 View
  • 219 Download
  • 11 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
The QuantiFERON-TB Gold in-tube test (QFT-GIT) and the tuberculin skin test (TST) are used to diagnose latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). However, conclusive evidence regarding the agreement of these two tests among high risk contacts is lacking. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to estimate the agreement between the TST and the QFT-GIT using kappa statistics.
METHODS
According to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses guidelines, scientific databases including PubMed, Scopus, and Ovid were searched using a targeted search strategy to identify relevant studies published as of June 2015. Two researchers reviewed the eligibility of studies and extracted data from them. The pooled kappa estimate was determined using a random effect model. Subgroup analysis, Egger’s test and sensitivity analysis were also performed.
RESULTS
A total of 6,744 articles were retrieved in the initial search, of which 24 studies had data suitable for meta-analysis. The pooled kappa coefficient and prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted kappa were 0.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34 to 0.45) and 0.45 (95% CI, 0.38 to 0.49), respectively. The results of the subgroup analysis found that age group, quality of the study, location, and the TST cutoff point affected heterogeneity for the kappa estimate. No publication bias was found (Begg’s test, p=0.53; Egger’s test, p=0.32).
CONCLUSIONS
The agreement between the QFT-GIT and the TST in diagnosing LTBI among high-risk contacts was found to range from fair to moderate.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Childhood Lupus Vulgaris after Bacillus Calmette–Guérin Vaccine
    Sarah Hamdy Soliman, Amany El Agamy El-Samadony, Ghada F. Rezk Hassan, Rania Ahmed El-Tatawy, Nesrin Sabry Gomaa
    Indian Journal of Paediatric Dermatology.2023; 24(3): 241.     CrossRef
  • A prevalence study in Guadalajara, Mexico, comparing tuberculin skin test and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube
    Arturo Plascencia Hernández, Rodrigo M. González Sánchez, Iván I. Hernández Cañaveral, Antonio Luévanos Velázquez, Pedro A. Martínez Arce, Alexander González Díaz, Manuel Sandoval Díaz, Yaxsier de Armas Rodríguez, Edilberto González Ochoa, Héctor Raúl Pér
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(3): e0264982.     CrossRef
  • Meta-analysis of latent tuberculosis in healthcare workers in Iran: a retrospective review
    NazaninZahra Sepehri, Seyed Mohammad Saghanezhad, Farshad Khoddami, Amin Arasteh, Marziyeh Delirakbariazar, Azad Khaledi
    Transactions of The Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.2021; 115(9): 965.     CrossRef
  • Comparative efficacy and safety of wenxin granule combined with antiarrhythmic drugs for atrial fibrillation
    Shuqing Shi, Yuguang Chu, Qiulei Jia, Yuanhui Hu
    Medicine.2021; 100(3): e24434.     CrossRef
  • Comparative Results of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube and QuantiFERON-TB Gold Plus Assays for Detection of Tuberculosis Infection in Clinical Samples
    Dongju Won, Jung Yong Park, Hyon-Suk Kim, Younhee Park, Geoffrey A. Land
    Journal of Clinical Microbiology.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of interventions for reducing TB incidence in countries with low TB incidence: a systematic review of reviews
    Simon M. Collin, Fatima Wurie, Morris C. Muzyamba, Gerard de Vries, Knut Lönnroth, Giovanni Battista Migliori, Ibrahim Abubakar, Sarah R. Anderson, Dominik Zenner
    European Respiratory Review.2019; 28(152): 180107.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Latent Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection (LTBI) in Saudi Arabia; Population based survey
    Hanan H. Balkhy, Kamel El Beltagy, Aiman El-Saed, Badr Aljasir, Abdulhakeem Althaqafi, Adel F. Alothman, Mohammad Alshalaan, Hamdan Al-Jahdali
    International Journal of Infectious Diseases.2017; 60: 11.     CrossRef
  • Positive Tuberculin Skin Test Among Health Care Workers: Prevalence and Risk Factors in Teaching Hospitals of a Highly Endemic Region for Tuberculosis, Zahedan, Iran
    Masoud Salehi, Batool Sharifi Mood, Maliheh Metanat
    International Journal of Infection.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Author’s Reply to Sani et al.: “Effects of Exercise Training in Hypoxia Versus Normoxia on Vascular Health: Comments on Clinical Importance”—Facing Common Misconceptions Concerning Meta-Analysis in Biomedical Research
    David Montero
    Sports Medicine.2016; 46(11): 1769.     CrossRef
  • Detection of latent tuberculosis infection among migrant farmworkers along the US-Mexico border
    E. Oren, M. H. Fiero, E. Barrett, B. Anderson, M. Nuῆez, F. Gonzalez-Salazar
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef

Epidemiol Health : Epidemiology and Health