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Behzad Pourhossein 2 Articles
Major infectious diseases affecting the Afghan immigrant population of Iran: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Behzad Pourhossein, Amin Doosti Irani, Ehsan Mostafavi
Epidemiol Health. 2015;37:e2015002.   Published online January 7, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2015002
  • 17,646 View
  • 211 Download
  • 18 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
As Afghans make up the largest group of foreign nationals in Iran, the aim of this study was to assess the proportion of Afghan immigrants among those afflicted by the most prevalent infectious diseases in Iran.
METHODS
National and international online scientific databases were searched through November 2013. The reference lists of included studies were also searched. All descriptive studies concerning the most common infectious diseases in Iran, including tuberculosis, multiple-drug-resistant tuberculosis, malaria, cholera, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, leishmaniasis, and hepatitis B were retrieved. The nationality of patients was not considered. The selection of studies and data extraction was performed separately by two authors. Results were reported using a random effect model with a 95% confidence interval (CI).
RESULTS
The overall proportion of Afghan immigrants with the aforementioned infectious diseases was 29% (95% CI, 21 to 37). According to a stratified analysis, the proportion of Afghan immigrants afflicted with tuberculosis was (29%), multiple-drug-resistant tuberculosis (56%), malaria (40%), cholera (8%), Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (25%), leishmaniasis (7%), and hepatitis B (14%).
CONCLUSIONS
It is highly recommended to monitor the health status of the Afghan immigrants when entering Iran, to reduce the spread of communicable diseases, which are viewed as serious in international health regulations.
Summary
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Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Health condition of Afghan refugees residing in Iran in comparison to Germany: a systematic review of empirical studies
    Parisa Rahimitabar, Alexander Kraemer, Kayvan Bozorgmehr, Fatemeh Ebrahimi, Amirhossein Takian
    International Journal for Equity in Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Perceived Vulnerability to Disease, Knowledge and Preventive Behavior Related to COVID-19 in Farsi and Arabic Speaking Refugees
    Schahryar Kananian, Samar Al-Sari, Ulrich Stangier
    Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health.2022; 24(5): 1245.     CrossRef
  • Health Status of Afghan Refugees in Europe: Policy and Practice Implications for an Optimised Healthcare
    Michael Matsangos, Laoura Ziaka, Artistomenis K. Exadaktylos, Jolanta Klukowska-Rötzler, Mairi Ziaka
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(15): 9157.     CrossRef
  • Restricted genetic heterogeneity of the Plasmodium vivax transmission-blocking vaccine (TBV) candidate Pvs48/45 in a low transmission setting: Implications for the Plasmodium vivax malaria vaccine development
    Soheila Asali, Abbasali Raz, Habibollah Turki, Ladan Mafakher, Elham Razmjou, Shahram Solaymani-Mohammadi
    Infection, Genetics and Evolution.2021; 89: 104710.     CrossRef
  • Vector-borne diseases in Iran: epidemiology and key challenges
    Najmeh Parhizgari, Norair Piazak, Ehsan Mostafavi
    Future Microbiology.2021; 16(1): 51.     CrossRef
  • Hyalomma spp. ticks and associated Anaplasma spp. and Ehrlichia spp. on the Iran-Pakistan border
    Nayyereh Choubdar, Fateh Karimian, Mona Koosha, Jalil Nejati, Mohammad Ali Oshaghi
    Parasites & Vectors.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • COVID‐19–infected woman along with tuberculosis and psychogenic non‐epileptic seizures: A case report
    Mahshid Nadershahbaz, Reza Bidaki, Saeed Azimi, Fatemeh Saghafi
    Clinical Case Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • “It is good, but I can’t afford it …” potential barriers to adequate prenatal care among Afghan women in Iran: a qualitative study in South Tehran
    Omid Dadras, Ziba Taghizade, Fateme Dadras, Leyla Alizade, Seyedahmad Seyedalinaghi, Masako Ono-Kihara, Masahiro Kihara, Takeo Nakayama
    BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The challenges of providing primary health care to Afghan immigrants in Tehran: a key global human right issue
    Afsaneh Takbiri, AmirHossein Takian, Abbas Rahimi Foroushani, Ebrahim Jaafaripooyan
    International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare.2020; 13(3): 259.     CrossRef
  • Clinical-Pathological Conference Series from the Medical University of Graz
    Philipp K. Bauer, Peter Krippl, Elisabeth Fabian, Karoline I. Mayer-Pickel, Robert Krause, Franz Bauer, Guenter J. Krejs
    Wiener klinische Wochenschrift.2020; 132(13-14): 403.     CrossRef
  • Bayesian Spatial Survival Analysis of Duration to Cure among New Smear-Positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis (PTB) Patients in Iran, during 2011–2018
    Eisa Nazar, Hossein Baghishani, Hassan Doosti, Vahid Ghavami, Ehsan Aryan, Mahshid Nasehi, Saeid Sharafi, Habibollah Esmaily, Jamshid Yazdani Charati
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 18(1): 54.     CrossRef
  • Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever and its history in Afghanistan
    Assadullah Samadi, M. M. K. Ababneh, M. Amiri
    CABI Reviews.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Educational Intervention Based on Health Belief Model on the Adoption of Preventive Behaviors of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in Ranchers
    Mehdi Karimi Aval, Ali Reza Ansari-Moghadam, Gholamreza Masoudy
    Health Scope.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Global research trends of World Health Organization’s top eight emerging pathogens
    Waleed M. Sweileh
    Globalization and Health.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Beijing and Haarlem genotypes among multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Iran: Systematic review and meta-analysis
    Samira Tarashi, Abolfazl Fateh, Fatemeh Rahimi Jamnani, Seyed Davar Siadat, Farzam Vaziri
    Tuberculosis.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever in travellers: A systematic review
    Hakan Leblebicioglu, Resat Ozaras, Tom E. Fletcher, Nick J. Beeching
    Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease.2016; 14(2): 73.     CrossRef
  • Hepatitis B and C and the Role of Non-specialists on Disease Elimination
    Masoud Mardani
    Archives of Clinical Infectious Diseases.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Spatio-Temporal History of HIV-1 CRF35_AD in Afghanistan and Iran
    Sana Eybpoosh, Abbas Bahrampour, Mohammad Karamouzian, Kayhan Azadmanesh, Fatemeh Jahanbakhsh, Ehsan Mostafavi, Farzaneh Zolala, Ali Akbar Haghdoost, Luis Menéndez-Arias
    PLOS ONE.2016; 11(6): e0156499.     CrossRef
Tularemia and plague survey in rodents in an earthquake zone in southeastern Iran
Behzad Pourhossein, Saber Esmaeili, Miklós Gyuranecz, Ehsan Mostafavi
Epidemiol Health. 2015;37:e2015050.   Published online November 17, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih/e2015050
  • 11,732 View
  • 118 Download
  • 17 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Earthquakes are one the most common natural disasters that lead to increased mortality and morbidity from transmissible diseases, partially because the rodents displaced by an earthquake can lead to an increased rate of disease transmission. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of plague and tularemia in rodents in the earthquake zones in southeastern Iran.
METHODS
In April 2013, a research team was dispatched to explore the possible presence of diseases in rodents displaced by a recent earthquake magnitude 7.7 around the cities of Khash and Saravan in Sistan and Baluchestan Province. Rodents were trapped near and in the earthquake zone, in a location where an outbreak of tularemia was reported in 2007. Rodent serums were tested for a serological survey using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
RESULTS
In the 13 areas that were studied, nine rodents were caught over a total of 200 trap-days. Fortyeight fleas and 10 ticks were obtained from the rodents. The ticks were from the Hyalomma genus and the fleas were from the Xenopsylla genus. All the trapped rodents were Tatera indica. Serological results were negative for plague, but the serum agglutination test was positive for tularemia in one of the rodents. Tatera indica has never been previously documented to be involved in the transmission of tularemia.
CONCLUSIONS
No evidence of the plague cycle was found in the rodents of the area, but evidence was found of tularemia infection in rodents, as demonstrated by a positive serological test for tularemia in one rodent.
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Citations

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  • The source of the Black Death in fourteenth-century central Eurasia
    Maria A. Spyrou, Lyazzat Musralina, Guido A. Gnecchi Ruscone, Arthur Kocher, Pier-Giorgio Borbone, Valeri I. Khartanovich, Alexandra Buzhilova, Leyla Djansugurova, Kirsten I. Bos, Denise Kühnert, Wolfgang Haak, Philip Slavin, Johannes Krause
    Nature.2022; 606(7915): 718.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of the intellectual and social structure of health system response plan to earthquake studies adopting word co-occurrence and narrative approaches
    SeyedHossein Mousavi, Hamidreza Khankeh, Golrokh Atighechian, MohammadH Yarmohammadian, Mehrdad Memarzadeh
    Journal of Education and Health Promotion.2022; 11(1): 362.     CrossRef
  • Francisella tularensis survey among ranchers and livestock in western Iran
    Hossein Ahangari Cohan, Mahmoud Jamshidian, Mahdi Rohani, Meysam Moravedji, Ehsan Mostafavi
    Comparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.2021; 74: 101598.     CrossRef
  • Vector-borne diseases in Iran: epidemiology and key challenges
    Najmeh Parhizgari, Norair Piazak, Ehsan Mostafavi
    Future Microbiology.2021; 16(1): 51.     CrossRef
  • Rodent Ectoparasites in the Middle East: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Md Mazharul Islam, Elmoubashar Farag, Khalid Eltom, Mohammad Mahmudul Hassan, Devendra Bansal, Francis Schaffner, Jolyon M. Medlock, Hamad Al-Romaihi, Zilungile Mkhize-Kwitshana
    Pathogens.2021; 10(2): 139.     CrossRef
  • Francisella tularensis human infections in a village of northwest Iran
    Saber Esmaeili, Mahdi Rohani, Ahmad Ghasemi, Mohammad Mehdi Gouya, Simin Khayatzadeh, Ahmad Mahmoudi, Hossein Ahangari Cohan, Anders Johansson, Max Maurin, Ehsan Mostafavi
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Surveillance of Francisella tularensis in surface water of Kurdistan province, west of Iran
    Hossein Ahangari Cohan, Mahmoud Jamshidian, Mahdi Rohani, Meysam Moravedji, Ehsan Mostafavi
    Comparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.2020; 69: 101419.     CrossRef
  • Wild Rodents and Their Ectoparasites in an Enzootic Plague Focus, Western Iran
    Ali Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi Sedaghat, Mohammad Reza Abai, Jamshid Darvish, Iraj Mobedi, Ahmad Mahmoudi, Ehsan Mostafavi
    Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases.2020; 20(5): 334.     CrossRef
  • Cross-sectional sero-prevalence of tularemia among murine rodents of Nepal
    Narayan Acharya, Krishna Prasad Acharya, Ishwari Prasad Dhakal
    Comparative Clinical Pathology.2019; 28(2): 517.     CrossRef
  • A detailed review of the mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) of Iran and their medical and veterinary importance
    Shahyad Azari-Hamidian, Behzad Norouzi, Ralph E. Harbach
    Acta Tropica.2019; 194: 106.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological survey of tularemia in Ilam Province, west of Iran
    Saber Esmaeili, Ahmad Ghasemi, Razi Naserifar, Ali Jalilian, Leila Molaeipoor, Max Maurin, Ehsan Mostafavi
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Seroepidemiological study of Q fever, brucellosis and tularemia in butchers and slaughterhouses workers in Lorestan, western of Iran
    Saber Esmaeili, Fahimeh Bagheri Amiri, Hamid Mokhayeri, Mohammad Hassan Kayedi, Max Maurin, Mahdi Rohani, Ehsan Mostafavi
    Comparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.2019; 66: 101322.     CrossRef
  • The fauna and perspective of rodentia ectoparasites in Iran relying on their roles within public health and veterinary characteristics
    Mousa khosravani
    Journal of Parasitic Diseases.2018; 42(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Rodent-borne diseases and their public health importance in Iran
    Mohammad Hasan Rabiee, Ahmad Mahmoudi, Roohollah Siahsarvie, Boris Kryštufek, Ehsan Mostafavi, Peter J. Krause
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2018; 12(4): e0006256.     CrossRef
  • Molecular Survey of Tularemia and Plague in Small Mammals From Iran
    Ehsan Mostafavi, Ahmad Ghasemi, Mahdi Rohani, Leila Molaeipoor, Saber Esmaeili, Zeinolabedin Mohammadi, Ahmad Mahmoudi, Mansour Aliabadian, Anders Johansson
    Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Field Study of Plague and Tularemia in Rodents, Western Iran
    Ehsan Mostafavi, Abdolrazagh Hashemi Shahraki, Alireza Japoni-Nejad, Saber Esmaeili, Jamshid Darvish, Mohammad Mehdi Sedaghat, Ali Mohammadi, Zeinolabedin Mohammadi, Ahmad Mahmoudi, Behzad Pourhossein, Ahmad Ghasemi, Miklós Gyuranecz, Elisabeth Carniel
    Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases.2017; 17(4): 247.     CrossRef
  • Upsurge of Rodents’ Population in a Rural Area of Northeastern Iran Raised Concerns about Rodent-borne Diseases
    Ahmad Ghasemi, Saber Esmaeili, Abdolrazagh Hashemi Shahraki, Hamed Hanifi, Zeinolabedin Mohammadi, Ahmad Mahmoudi, Mahdi Rohani, Ehsan Mostafavi
    Journal of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases .2017; 5(1): 21.     CrossRef

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